Neutrogena T/Derm Topical


Generic Name: coal tar (Topical route)

kole tar

Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

Betatar Gel Cutar Emulsion Denorex DHS Tar Doak Tar Duplex T Fototar Ionil-T Plus Medotar MG 217 Neutrogena T/Derm Neutrogena T/Gel

In Canada

Estar Liquor Carbonis Detergens Psorigel Spectro Tar Skin Wash Tar Distillate

Available Dosage Forms:

Liquid Shampoo Lotion Solution Cream Gel/Jelly Soap Kit Ointment Bar Foam Emulsion

Therapeutic Class: Keratolytic

Uses For Neutrogena T/Derm

Coal tar is used to treat eczema, psoriasis, seborrheic dermatitis, and other skin disorders.

Some of these preparations are available only with your doctor's prescription.

Before Using Neutrogena T/Derm

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this medicine, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Coal tar products should not be used on infants, unless otherwise directed by your doctor. Studies on this medicine have been done only in adult patients, and there is no specific information comparing use of this medicine in children with use in other age groups.

Geriatric

Many medicines have not been studied specifically in older people. Therefore, it may not be known whether they work exactly the same way they do in younger adults or if they cause different side effects or problems in older people. There is no specific information comparing use of this medicine in the elderly with use in other age groups.

Breast Feeding

Studies in women suggest that this medication poses minimal risk to the infant when used during breastfeeding.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. Tell your healthcare professional if you are taking any other prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medicine.

Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Proper Use of coal tar

This section provides information on the proper use of a number of products that contain coal tar. It may not be specific to Neutrogena T/Derm. Please read with care.

Use this medicine only as directed. Do not use more of it and do not use it more often than recommended on the label, unless otherwise directed by your doctor. To do so may increase the chance of side effects.

After applying coal tar, protect the treated area from direct sunlight and do not use a sunlamp for 72 hours, unless otherwise directed by your doctor, since a severe reaction may occur. Also, make sure you have removed all the coal tar medicine from your skin before you go back into direct sunlight or use a sunlamp.

Do not apply this medicine to infected, blistered, raw, or oozing areas of the skin.

Keep this medicine away from the eyes. If you should accidentally get some in your eyes, flush them thoroughly with water at once.

To use the cream or ointment form of this medicine:

Apply enough medicine to cover the affected area, and rub in gently.

To use the gel form of this medicine:

Apply enough gel to cover the affected area, and rub in gently. Allow the gel to remain on the affected area for 5 minutes, then remove excess gel by patting with a clean tissue.

To use the shampoo form of this medicine:

Wet the scalp and hair with lukewarm water. Apply a generous amount of shampoo and rub into the scalp, then rinse. Apply the shampoo again, working up a rich lather, and allow to remain on the scalp for 5 minutes. Then rinse thoroughly.

To use the nonshampoo liquid form of this medicine:

Some of these preparations are to be applied directly to dry or wet skin, some are to be added to lukewarm bath water, and some may be applied directly to dry or wet skin or added to lukewarm bath water. Make sure you know exactly how you should use this medicine. If you have any questions about this, check with your health care professional. If this medicine is to be applied directly to the skin, apply enough to cover the affected area, and rub in gently. Some of these preparations contain alcohol and are flammable. Do not use near heat, near open flame, or while smoking. Dosing

The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

For eczema, psoriasis, seborrheic dermatitis, and other skin disorders: For cleansing bar dosage form: Adults—Use one or two times a day, or as directed by your doctor. Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor. For cream dosage form: Adults—Apply to the affected area(s) of the skin up to four times a day. Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor. For gel dosage form: Adults—Apply to the affected area(s) of the skin one or two times a day. Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor. For lotion dosage form: Adults—Apply directly to the affected area(s) of the skin or use as a bath, hand or foot soak, or as a hair rinse, depending on the product. Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor. For ointment dosage form: Adults—Apply to the affected area(s) of the skin two or three times a day. Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor. For shampoo dosage form: Adults—Use once a day to once a week or as directed by your doctor. Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor. For topical solution dosage form: Adults—Apply to wet the skin or scalp, or use as a bath, depending on the product. Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor. For topical suspension dosage form: Adults—Use as a bath. Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor. Missed Dose

If you miss a dose of this medicine, apply it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule.

Storage

Store the medicine in a closed container at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and direct light. Keep from freezing.

Keep out of the reach of children.

Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed.

Precautions While Using Neutrogena T/Derm

If this medicine is used on the scalp, it may temporarily discolor blond, bleached, or tinted hair.

Coal tar may stain the skin or clothing. Avoid getting it on your clothing. The stain on the skin will wear off after you stop using the medicine.

Neutrogena T/Derm Side Effects

In animal studies, coal tar has been shown to increase the chance of skin cancer.

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor as soon as possible if any of the following side effects occur:

Rare Skin irritation not present before use of this medicine skin rash

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

More common Stinging (mild)—especially for gel and solution dosage forms

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

The information contained in the Thomson Reuters Micromedex products as delivered by Drugs.com is intended as an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment. It is not a substitute for a medical exam, nor does it replace the need for services provided by medical professionals. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before taking any prescription or over the counter drugs (including any herbal medicines or supplements) or following any treatment or regimen. Only your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist can provide you with advice on what is safe and effective for you.

The use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products is at your sole risk. These products are provided "AS IS" and "as available" for use, without warranties of any kind, either express or implied. Thomson Reuters Healthcare and Drugs.com make no representation or warranty as to the accuracy, reliability, timeliness, usefulness or completeness of any of the information contained in the products. Additionally, THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE MAKES NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTIES AS TO THE OPINIONS OR OTHER SERVICE OR DATA YOU MAY ACCESS, DOWNLOAD OR USE AS A RESULT OF USE OF THE THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS. ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR USE ARE HEREBY EXCLUDED. Thomson Reuters Healthcare does not assume any responsibility or risk for your use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products.

More Neutrogena T/Derm Topical resources Neutrogena T/Derm Topical Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Neutrogena T/Derm Topical Support Group 0 Reviews for Neutrogena T/Derm Topical - Add your own review/rating Compare Neutrogena T/Derm Topical with other medications Dermatitis Psoriasis Seborrheic Dermatitis
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mechlorethamine Topical


me-klor-ETH-a-meen

Pharmacologic Class: Alkylating Agent

Chemical Class: Nitrogen Mustard

Uses For mechlorethamine

Mechlorethamine belongs to the group of medicines called alkylating agents. It is used to treat certain skin conditions that could turn to cancer if left untreated.

Mechlorethamine interferes with the growth of problem cells, which are eventually destroyed. However, there is also a chance that mechlorethamine can cause some kinds of skin cancer, especially after it has been used for several years.

Before you begin treatment with mechlorethamine, you and your doctor should talk about the good mechlorethamine will do as well as the risks of using it.

Mechlorethamine is available only with your doctor's prescription.

Before Using mechlorethamine

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For mechlorethamine, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to mechlorethamine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

There is no specific information about use of mechlorethamine on the skin in children.

Geriatric

Many medicines have not been tested in older people. Therefore, it may not be known whether they work exactly the same way they do in younger adults or if they cause different side effects or problems in older people. There is no specific information about the use of mechlorethamine on the skin in the elderly.

Pregnancy Pregnancy Category Explanation All Trimesters D Studies in pregnant women have demonstrated a risk to the fetus. However, the benefits of therapy in a life threatening situation or a serious disease, may outweigh the potential risk. Breast Feeding

There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking mechlorethamine, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using mechlorethamine with any of the following medicines is not recommended. Your doctor may decide not to treat you with this medication or change some of the other medicines you take.

Rotavirus Vaccine, Live

Using mechlorethamine with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

Adenovirus Vaccine Type 4, Live Adenovirus Vaccine Type 7, Live Bacillus of Calmette and Guerin Vaccine, Live Influenza Virus Vaccine, Live Measles Virus Vaccine, Live Mumps Virus Vaccine, Live Rotavirus Vaccine, Live Rubella Virus Vaccine, Live Smallpox Vaccine Typhoid Vaccine Varicella Virus Vaccine Warfarin Yellow Fever Vaccine Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Proper Use of mechlorethamine

Mechlorethamine may be used either as a solution or as an ointment. If you are using the solution, it must be mixed just before you use it since it breaks down quickly. Mix the solution carefully according to your doctor's or pharmacist's directions.

When preparing the solution, remember:

Do not use the mechlorethamine if the solution is discolored or if droplets of water appear in the vial. Avoid inhaling the powder or any vapors. If some of the powder or solution accidentally gets on your skin, immediately wash that area of skin. Use a large amount of water and continue to wash for at least 15 minutes. If eye contact occurs, use an eyewash recommended by your doctor. Keep this eyewash on hand. Follow carefully any other instructions your doctor may have given you. All equipment used must be specially cleaned, even if it is to be thrown away. Follow carefully your doctor's instructions for doing this, using the special solution recommended.

Take a shower and rinse carefully just before you apply mechlorethamine solution or ointment, unless otherwise directed by your doctor. Make sure your skin is completely dry before applying the ointment. Do not shower again until the next treatment.

Apply the solution or ointment all over the body, until the entire amount for a dose is used up. Wear rubber or plastic gloves if you are using your hands. To apply the solution, a 2-inch-wide soft brush or gauze may be used instead. Let the solution dry.

Mechlorethamine should be applied more lightly to the groin, armpits, inside the bends of the elbows, and behind the knees. These areas are more likely to get irritated.

Avoid contact with the eyes, nose, or mouth, unless otherwise directed by your doctor.

Mechlorethamine is usually applied once a day. However, follow your doctor's instructions. Continue to use the medicine as long as you are told to. This may be months or years. However, do not use mechlorethamine more often or for a longer time than ordered. To do so may increase the chance of unwanted effects.

Dosing

The dose of mechlorethamine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of mechlorethamine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

For topical dosage forms (ointment or solution): For mycosis fungoides: Adults—Apply to the entire skin surface once a day. Several months after mechlorethamine has helped your problem, your doctor may decrease the treatments to several times a week. Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor. Missed Dose

If you miss a dose of mechlorethamine, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not double doses.

Storage

Store the medicine in a closed container at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and direct light. Keep from freezing.

Keep out of the reach of children.

Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed.

The solution should not be stored but instead should be freshly made just before it is used.

Precautions While Using mechlorethamine

It is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits to make sure that mechlorethamine is working properly and to check for unwanted effects.

mechlorethamine Side Effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. When mechlorethamine is applied to the skin, it does not usually cause the same effects as when it is given by injection.

However, stop using mechlorethamine and check with your doctor immediately if the following side effects occur:

Hives shortness of breath (sudden) skin rash or itching sore, reddened skin

Check with your doctor also if you develop dry skin. There may be a lotion or ointment that you can use to help this. However, do not use anything else on your skin unless directed by your doctor.

Your skin color may darken after you have used mechlorethamine for a while. The effect will go away after you have stopped using the medicine.

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: mechlorethamine Topical side effects (in more detail)

The information contained in the Thomson Reuters Micromedex products as delivered by Drugs.com is intended as an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment. It is not a substitute for a medical exam, nor does it replace the need for services provided by medical professionals. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before taking any prescription or over the counter drugs (including any herbal medicines or supplements) or following any treatment or regimen. Only your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist can provide you with advice on what is safe and effective for you.

The use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products is at your sole risk. These products are provided "AS IS" and "as available" for use, without warranties of any kind, either express or implied. Thomson Reuters Healthcare and Drugs.com make no representation or warranty as to the accuracy, reliability, timeliness, usefulness or completeness of any of the information contained in the products. Additionally, THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE MAKES NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTIES AS TO THE OPINIONS OR OTHER SERVICE OR DATA YOU MAY ACCESS, DOWNLOAD OR USE AS A RESULT OF USE OF THE THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS. ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR USE ARE HEREBY EXCLUDED. Thomson Reuters Healthcare does not assume any responsibility or risk for your use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products.

More mechlorethamine Topical resources Mechlorethamine Topical Side Effects (in more detail) Mechlorethamine Topical Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Mechlorethamine Topical Drug Interactions Mechlorethamine Topical Support Group 0 Reviews for Mechlorethamine Topical - Add your own review/rating Compare mechlorethamine Topical with other medications Cancer Mycosis Fungoides
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Zovirax Topical


Generic Name: acyclovir (Topical route)

ay-SYE-kloe-vir

Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

Zovirax

In Canada

Acyclovir

Available Dosage Forms:

Cream Ointment

Therapeutic Class: Antiviral

Pharmacologic Class: Viral DNA Polymerase Inhibitor

Chemical Class: Guanosine Nucleoside Analog

Uses For Zovirax

Acyclovir belongs to the family of medicines called antivirals. Antivirals are used to treat infections caused by viruses. Usually they work for only one kind or group of virus infections.

Topical acyclovir is used to treat the symptoms of herpes simplex virus infections of the skin, mucous membranes, and genitals (sex organs). Although topical acyclovir will not cure herpes simplex, it may help relieve the pain and discomfort and may help the sores (if any) heal faster. Topical acyclovir may also be used for other conditions as determined by your doctor.

Acyclovir is available only with your doctor's prescription.

Before Using Zovirax

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this medicine, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Studies on this medicine have been done only in adult patients, and there is no specific information comparing use of topical acyclovir in children with use in other age groups.

Geriatric

Many medicines have not been studied specifically in older people. Therefore, it may not be known whether they work exactly the same way they do in younger adults. Although there is no specific information comparing the use of topical acyclovir in the elderly with use in other age groups, this medicine is not expected to cause different side effects or problems in older people than it does in younger adults.

Pregnancy Pregnancy Category Explanation All Trimesters B Animal studies have revealed no evidence of harm to the fetus, however, there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR animal studies have shown an adverse effect, but adequate studies in pregnant women have failed to demonstrate a risk to the fetus. Breast Feeding

Studies in women suggest that this medication poses minimal risk to the infant when used during breastfeeding.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking this medicine, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

Tizanidine Varicella Virus Vaccine

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines may cause an increased risk of certain side effects, but using both drugs may be the best treatment for you. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

Fosphenytoin Phenytoin Valproic Acid Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Other Medical Problems

Tell your doctor if your herpes simplex infection keeps coming back while you are using acyclovir.

Proper Use of Zovirax

Acyclovir may come with patient information about herpes simplex infections. Read this information carefully. If you have any questions, check with your health care professional.

Do not use this medicine in the eyes.

Acyclovir is best used as soon as possible after the signs and symptoms of herpes infection (for example, pain, burning, or blisters) begin to appear.

Use a finger cot or rubber glove when applying this medicine. This will help keep you from spreading the infection to other areas of your body and will prevent the transmission of the infection to other persons . Apply enough medicine to completely cover all the sores (blisters). A 1.25-centimeter (approximately ?-inch) strip of ointment applied to each area of the affected skin measuring 5 ? 5 centimeters (approximately 2 ? 2 inches) is usually enough, unless otherwise directed by your doctor.

To help clear up your herpes infection, continue using acyclovir for the full time of treatment, even if your symptoms begin to clear up after a few days. Do not miss any doses. However, do not use this medicine more often or for a longer time than your doctor ordered.

Dosing

The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

For topical dosage form (cream): For herpes simplex infection: Adults—Apply to the affected area(s), four to six times a day, for up to ten days. Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor. For topical dosage form (ointment): For herpes simplex infection: In the U.S. Adults—Apply to the affected area(s), every three hours, for a total of six times a day, for seven days. Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor. In Canada Adults—Apply to the affected area(s), four to six times a day, for up to ten days. Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor. Missed Dose

If you miss a dose of this medicine, apply it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule.

Storage

Store the medicine in a closed container at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and direct light. Keep from freezing.

Keep out of the reach of children.

Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed.

Precautions While Using Zovirax

Women with genital herpes may be more likely to get cancer of the cervix (opening to the womb). Therefore, it is very important that Pap tests be taken at least once a year to check for cancer. Cervical cancer can be cured if found and treated early.

If your symptoms do not improve within 1 week, or if they become worse, check with your doctor.

Consider the possibility of viral resistance to acyclovir if little or no improvement in symptoms during therapy.

The areas affected by herpes should be kept as clean and dry as possible. Also, wear loose-fitting clothing to avoid irritating the sores (blisters).

Herpes infection of the genitals can be caught from or spread to your partner during any sexual activity. Although you may get herpes even though your sexual partner has no symptoms, the infection is more likely to be spread if sores are present. This is true until the sores are completely healed and the scabs have fallen off. The use of a condom (prophylactic) may help prevent the spread of herpes. However, spermicidal (sperm-killing) jelly or a diaphragm will not help prevent the spread of herpes. Therefore, it is best to avoid any sexual activity if either you or your partner has any symptoms of herpes. It is also important to remember that acyclovir will not keep you from spreading herpes to others.

Zovirax Side Effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

More common Mild pain, burning, or stinging Less common Itching Rare Itching, stinging, or redness of the genital area skin rash

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Zovirax Topical side effects (in more detail)

The information contained in the Thomson Reuters Micromedex products as delivered by Drugs.com is intended as an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment. It is not a substitute for a medical exam, nor does it replace the need for services provided by medical professionals. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before taking any prescription or over the counter drugs (including any herbal medicines or supplements) or following any treatment or regimen. Only your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist can provide you with advice on what is safe and effective for you.

The use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products is at your sole risk. These products are provided "AS IS" and "as available" for use, without warranties of any kind, either express or implied. Thomson Reuters Healthcare and Drugs.com make no representation or warranty as to the accuracy, reliability, timeliness, usefulness or completeness of any of the information contained in the products. Additionally, THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE MAKES NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTIES AS TO THE OPINIONS OR OTHER SERVICE OR DATA YOU MAY ACCESS, DOWNLOAD OR USE AS A RESULT OF USE OF THE THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS. ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR USE ARE HEREBY EXCLUDED. Thomson Reuters Healthcare does not assume any responsibility or risk for your use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products.

More Zovirax Topical resources Zovirax Topical Side Effects (in more detail) Zovirax Topical Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding 3 Reviews for Zovirax Topical - Add your own review/rating Zovirax Topical Concise Consumer Information (Cerner Multum) Compare Zovirax Topical with other medications Cold Sores Herpes Simplex
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Tisit Topical


Generic Name: pyrethrum extract and piperonyl butoxide (Topical route)

pye-REE-thrum EX-trackt, PIP-er-oh-nil byoo-TOX-ide

Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

A200 Maximum Strength A200 Time-Tested Formula Lice-X Licide Medi-Lice Maximum Strength Pronto Maximum Strength Pyrinex Pyrinyl Rid Tisit

Available Dosage Forms:

Gel/Jelly Liquid Shampoo Kit Foam

Therapeutic Class: Pediculicide

Chemical Class: Pyrethrums

Uses For Tisit

Medicine containing pyrethrins is used to treat head, body, and pubic lice infections. This medicine is absorbed by the lice and destroys them by acting on their nervous systems. It does not affect humans in this way. The piperonyl butoxide is included to make the pyrethrins more effective in killing the lice. This combination medicine is known as a pediculicide.

This medicine is available without a prescription.

Before Using Tisit

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this medicine, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Although there is no specific information comparing use of pyrethrins and piperonyl butoxide combination in children with use in other age groups, this medicine is not expected to cause different side effects or problems in children than it does in adults.

Geriatric

Many medicines have not been studied specifically in older people. Therefore, it may not be known whether they work exactly the same way they do in younger adults. Although there is no specific information comparing use of pyrethrins and piperonyl butoxide combination medicine in the elderly with use in other age groups, this medicine is not expected to cause different side effects or problems in older people than it does in younger adults.

Pregnancy Pregnancy Category Explanation All Trimesters C Animal studies have shown an adverse effect and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR no animal studies have been conducted and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women. Breast Feeding

There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. Tell your healthcare professional if you are taking any other prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medicine.

Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of this medicine. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

Inflammation of the skin (severe)—Use of pyrethrins and piperonyl butoxide combination may make the condition worse Proper Use of pyrethrum extract and piperonyl butoxide

This section provides information on the proper use of a number of products that contain pyrethrum extract and piperonyl butoxide. It may not be specific to Tisit. Please read with care.

Pyrethrins and piperonyl butoxide combination medicine usually comes with patient directions. Read them carefully before using this medicine.

Use this medicine only as directed. Do not use more of it and do not use it more often than recommended on the label. To do so may increase the chance of absorption through the skin and the chance of side effects.

Keep pyrethrins and piperonyl butoxide combination medicine away from the mouth and do not inhale it. This medicine is harmful if swallowed or inhaled.

To lessen the chance of inhaling this medicine, apply it in a well-ventilated room (for example, one with free flowing air or with a fan turned on).

Keep this medicine away from the eyes and other mucous membranes, such as the inside of the nose, mouth, or vagina, because it may cause irritation. If you accidentally get some in your eyes, flush them thoroughly with water at once.

Do not apply this medicine to the eyelashes or eyebrows . If they become infected with lice, check with your doctor.

To use the gel or solution form of this medicine:

Apply enough medicine to thoroughly wet the dry hair and scalp or skin. Allow the medicine to remain on the affected areas for exactly 10 minutes. Then, thoroughly wash the affected areas with warm water and soap or regular shampoo. Rinse thoroughly and dry with a clean towel.

To use the shampoo form of this medicine:

Apply enough medicine to thoroughly wet the dry hair and scalp or skin. Allow the medicine to remain on the affected areas for exactly 10 minutes. Then use a small amount of water and work shampoo into the hair and scalp or skin until a lather forms. Rinse thoroughly and dry with a clean towel.

After rinsing and drying, use a nit removal comb (special fine-toothed comb, usually included with this medicine) to remove the dead lice and eggs (nits) from hair.

Immediately after using this medicine, wash your hands to remove any medicine that may be on them.

This medicine should be used again in 7 to 10 days after the first treatment in order to kill any newly hatched lice.

Lice can easily move from one person to another by close body contact. This can happen also by direct contact with such things as clothing, hats, scarves, bedding, towels, washcloths, hairbrushes and combs, or the hair of infected persons. Therefore, all members of your household should be examined for lice and receive treatment if they are found to be infected.

To use this medicine for pubic (crab) lice:

Your sexual partner may also need to be treated, since the infection may spread to persons in close contact. If your partner is not being treated or if you have any questions about this, check with your doctor. Dosing

The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

For topical dosage forms (gel, solution shampoo, and topical solution): For head, body, or pubic lice: Adults and children—Use one time, then repeat one time in seven to ten days. Storage

Store the medicine in a closed container at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and direct light. Keep from freezing.

Keep out of the reach of children.

Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed.

Precautions While Using Tisit

To prevent reinfection or spreading of the infection to other people, good health habits are also required. These include the following:

For head lice Machine wash all clothing (including hats, scarves, and coats), bedding, towels, and washcloths in very hot water and dry them by using the hot cycle of a dryer for at least 20 minutes. Clothing or bedding that cannot be washed should be dry-cleaned or sealed in a plastic bag for 2 weeks. Shampoo all wigs and hairpieces. Wash all hairbrushes and combs in very hot soapy water (above 130 °F) for 5 to 10 minutes and do not share them with other people. Clean the house or room by thoroughly vacuuming upholstered furniture, rugs, and floors. For body lice Machine wash all clothing, bedding, towels, and washcloths in very hot water and dry them by using the hot cycle of a dryer for at least 20 minutes. Clothing or bedding that cannot be washed should be dry-cleaned or sealed in a plastic bag for 2 weeks. Clean the house or room by thoroughly vacuuming upholstered furniture, rugs, and floors. For pubic lice Machine wash all clothing (especially underwear), bedding, towels, and washcloths in very hot water and dry them by using the hot cycle of a dryer for at least 20 minutes. Clothing or bedding that cannot be washed should be dry-cleaned or sealed in a plastic bag for 2 weeks. Scrub toilet seats frequently. Tisit Side Effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor as soon as possible if any of the following side effects occur:

Less common or rare Skin irritation not present before use of this medicine skin rash or infection sneezing (sudden attacks of) stuffy or runny nose wheezing or difficulty in breathing

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Tisit Topical side effects (in more detail)

The information contained in the Thomson Reuters Micromedex products as delivered by Drugs.com is intended as an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment. It is not a substitute for a medical exam, nor does it replace the need for services provided by medical professionals. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before taking any prescription or over the counter drugs (including any herbal medicines or supplements) or following any treatment or regimen. Only your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist can provide you with advice on what is safe and effective for you.

The use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products is at your sole risk. These products are provided "AS IS" and "as available" for use, without warranties of any kind, either express or implied. Thomson Reuters Healthcare and Drugs.com make no representation or warranty as to the accuracy, reliability, timeliness, usefulness or completeness of any of the information contained in the products. Additionally, THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE MAKES NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTIES AS TO THE OPINIONS OR OTHER SERVICE OR DATA YOU MAY ACCESS, DOWNLOAD OR USE AS A RESULT OF USE OF THE THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS. ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR USE ARE HEREBY EXCLUDED. Thomson Reuters Healthcare does not assume any responsibility or risk for your use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products.

More Tisit Topical resources Tisit Topical Side Effects (in more detail) Tisit Topical Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Tisit Topical Support Group 0 Reviews for Tisit Topical - Add your own review/rating Compare Tisit Topical with other medications Head Lice Lice
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Women's Rogaine Topical


Generic Name: minoxidil (Topical route)

min-OX-i-dil

Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

Men's Rogaine Rogaine Rogaine For Men Extra Strength Women's Rogaine

In Canada

Apo-Gain Gen-Minoxidol Hairgro Hair Regrowth Treatment Med Minoxidil Minox

Available Dosage Forms:

Solution Foam

Therapeutic Class: Alopecia Agent

Uses For Women's Rogaine

Minoxidil applied to the scalp is used to stimulate hair growth in adult men and women with a certain type of baldness. The exact way that this medicine works is not known.

If hair growth is going to occur with the use of minoxidil, it usually occurs after the medicine has been used for several months and lasts only as long as the medicine continues to be used. Hair loss will begin again within a few months after minoxidil treatment is stopped.

In the U.S., this medicine is available without a prescription.

Before Using Women's Rogaine

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this medicine, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Appropriate studies have not been performed on the relationship of age to the effects of topical minoxidil in children. Safety and efficacy have not been established ..

Geriatric

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated geriatrics-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of topical minoxidil in the elderly. However, studies have shown that the medicine works best in younger patients who have a short history of hair loss. Minoxidil has not been studied in patients older than 65 years of age .

Pregnancy Pregnancy Category Explanation All Trimesters C Animal studies have shown an adverse effect and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR no animal studies have been conducted and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women. Breast Feeding

Studies in women suggest that this medication poses minimal risk to the infant when used during breastfeeding.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. Tell your healthcare professional if you are taking any other prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medicine.

Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of this medicine. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

Any other skin problems, an irritation, or a sunburn on the scalp—These conditions may cause too much topical minoxidil to be absorbed into the body and may increase the chance of side effects. Heart disease or Hypertension (high blood pressure)—Topical minoxidil has not been studied in patients who have these conditions, but more serious problems may develop for these patients if they use more medicine than is recommended over a large area and too much minoxidil is absorbed into the body. Proper Use of minoxidil

This section provides information on the proper use of a number of products that contain minoxidil. It may not be specific to Women's Rogaine. Please read with care.

This medicine usually comes with patient instructions. It is important that you read the instructions carefully.

It is very important that you use this medicine only as directed. Do not use more of it and do not use it more often than your doctor ordered. To do so may increase the chance of it being absorbed through the skin. For the same reason, do not apply minoxidil to other parts of your body. Absorption into the body may affect the heart and blood vessels and cause unwanted effects.

Do not use any other skin products on the same skin area on which you use minoxidil. Hair coloring, hair permanents, and hair relaxers may be used during minoxidil therapy as long as the scalp is washed just before applying the hair coloring, permanent, or relaxer. Minoxidil should not be used 24 hours before and after the hair treatment procedure. Be sure to not double your doses of minoxidil to make up for any missed doses.

To apply minoxidil topical solution:

Make sure your hair and scalp are completely dry before applying this medicine. Apply the amount prescribed to the area of the scalp being treated, beginning in the center of the area. Follow your doctor's instructions on how to apply the solution, using the applicator provided. Do not shampoo your hair for 4 hours after applying minoxidil. Immediately after using this medicine, wash your hands to remove any medicine that may be on them. Do not use a hairdryer to dry the scalp after you apply minoxidil solution. Blowing with a hairdryer on the scalp may make the treatment less effective. Allow the minoxidil to completely dry for 2 to 4 hours after applying it, including before going to bed. Minoxidil can stain clothing, hats, or bed linen if your hair or scalp is not fully dry after using the medicine. Avoid transferring the medicine while wet to other parts of the body. This can occur if the medicine gets on your pillowcase or bed linens or if your hands are not washed after applying minoxidil.

To apply minoxidil topical foam:

Open the container by matching the arrow on can ring with the arrow on cap. Pull off the cap. Part the hair into one or more rows to expose the hair thinning area on the scalp. Hold the can upside down and press the nozzle to put foam on your fingers. Use your fingers to spread the foam over the hair loss area and gently massage into your scalp. Immediately after using this medicine, wash your hands to remove any medicine that may be on them .

If your scalp becomes abraded, irritated, or sunburned, check with your doctor before applying minoxidil.

Minoxidil topical foam or solution is for use on the scalp only. Keep this medicine away from the eyes, nose, and mouth. If you should accidentally get some in your eyes, nose, or mouth, flush the area thoroughly with cool tap water. If you are using the pump spray, be careful not to breathe in the spray .

Do not use the foam near heat or open flame, or while smoking. Do not puncture, break, or burn the aerosol can .

Dosing

The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

For hair growth: For topical solution dosage form: Adults—Apply 1 milliliter (mL) to the scalp two times a day. Children—Use and dose must be determined by the doctor. For topical foam dosage form: Adults—Apply half a capful to the scalp two times a day. Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor . Missed Dose

If you miss a dose of this medicine, apply it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule.

Storage

Store the medicine in a closed container at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and direct light. Keep from freezing.

Keep out of the reach of children.

Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed.

Flammable: Keep away from fire or flame.

Precautions While Using Women's Rogaine

It is important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits to make sure that this medicine is working properly and to check for unwanted effects.

Tell your doctor if you notice continued itching, redness, or burning of your scalp after you apply minoxidil. If the itching, redness, or burning is severe, wash the medicine off and check with your doctor before using it again.

Hair loss may continue for 2 weeks after you start using minoxidil. Tell your doctor if your hair loss continues after 2 weeks. Also, tell your doctor if your hair growth does not increase after using minoxidil for 4 months.

Women's Rogaine Side Effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor as soon as possible if any of the following side effects occur:

Less common Itching or skin rash (continued) Rare Acne at site of application burning of scalp facial hair growth increased hair loss inflammation or soreness at root of hair reddened skin swelling of face Signs and symptoms of too much medicine being absorbed into the body—Rare Blurred vision or other changes in vision chest pain dizziness fainting fast or irregular heartbeat flushing headache lightheadedness numbness or tingling of hands, feet, or face swelling of face, hands, feet, or lower legs weight gain (rapid)

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

The information contained in the Thomson Reuters Micromedex products as delivered by Drugs.com is intended as an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment. It is not a substitute for a medical exam, nor does it replace the need for services provided by medical professionals. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before taking any prescription or over the counter drugs (including any herbal medicines or supplements) or following any treatment or regimen. Only your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist can provide you with advice on what is safe and effective for you.

The use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products is at your sole risk. These products are provided "AS IS" and "as available" for use, without warranties of any kind, either express or implied. Thomson Reuters Healthcare and Drugs.com make no representation or warranty as to the accuracy, reliability, timeliness, usefulness or completeness of any of the information contained in the products. Additionally, THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE MAKES NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTIES AS TO THE OPINIONS OR OTHER SERVICE OR DATA YOU MAY ACCESS, DOWNLOAD OR USE AS A RESULT OF USE OF THE THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS. ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR USE ARE HEREBY EXCLUDED. Thomson Reuters Healthcare does not assume any responsibility or risk for your use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products.

More Women's Rogaine Topical resources Women's Rogaine Topical Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Women's Rogaine Topical Drug Interactions Women's Rogaine Topical Support Group 7 Reviews for Women's Rogaine Topical - Add your own review/rating Compare Women's Rogaine Topical with other medications Alopecia
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Ampicillin Sodium


Generic Name: penicillin (Oral route, Injection route, Intravenous route, Intramuscular route)

Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

Amoxil Bactocill Bicillin L-A Cloxapen Crysticillin Dynapen Geocillin Nafcil Pfizerpen Pipracil Principen Staphcillin Ticar Veetids

In Canada

Amoxil Pediatric Ampicillin Sodium Apo-Amoxi Apo-Amoxi Sugar-Free Apo-Cloxi Apo-Pen-Vk Gen-Amoxicillin Med Amoxicillin Nadopen V 200 Nadopen V 400 Novamoxin

Available Dosage Forms:

Powder for Suspension Tablet Tablet, Chewable Tablet for Suspension Tablet, Extended Release Capsule Powder for Solution Suspension Solution Syrup Uses For Ampicillin Sodium

Penicillins are used to treat infections caused by bacteria. They work by killing the bacteria or preventing their growth.

There are several different kinds of penicillins. Each is used to treat different kinds of infections. One kind of penicillin usually may not be used in place of another. In addition, penicillins are used to treat bacterial infections in many different parts of the body. They are sometimes given with other antibacterial medicines (antibiotics). Some of the penicillins may also be used for other problems as determined by your doctor. However, none of the penicillins will work for colds, flu, or other virus infections.

Penicillins are available only with your doctor's prescription.

Once a medicine has been approved for marketing for a certain use, experience may show that it is also useful for other medical problems. Although these uses are not included in product labeling, penicillins are used in certain patients with the following medical conditions:

Chlamydia infections in pregnant women—Amoxicillin and ampicillin Gas gangrene—Penicillin G Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis or peptic ulcer disease—Amoxicillin Leptospirosis—Ampicillin and penicillin G Lyme disease—Amoxicillin and penicillin V Typhoid fever—Amoxicillin and ampicillin Before Using Ampicillin Sodium Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to medicines in this group or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Many penicillins have been used in children and, in effective doses, are not expected to cause different side effects or problems in children than they do in adults.

Some strengths of the chewable tablets of amoxicillin contain aspartame, which is changed by the body to phenylalanine, a substance that is harmful to patients with phenylketonuria.

Geriatric

Penicillins have been used in the elderly and have not been shown to cause different side effects or problems in older people than they do in younger adults.

Pregnancy

Penicillins have not been studied in pregnant women. However, penicillins have been widely used in pregnant women and have not been shown to cause birth defects or other problems in animal studies.

Breast Feeding

Penicillins pass into the breast milk. Even though only small amounts may pass into breast milk, allergic reactions, diarrhea, fungus infections, and skin rash may occur in nursing babies.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking any of these medicines, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using medicines in this class with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

Cyclosporine Methotrexate Vecuronium Venlafaxine Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of medicines in this class. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

Allergy, general (such as asthma, eczema, hay fever, hives), history of—Patients with a history of general allergies may be more likely to have a severe reaction to penicillins Bleeding problems, history of—Patients with a history of bleeding problems may be more likely to have bleeding when receiving carbenicillin, piperacillin, or ticarcillin Congestive heart failure (CHF) or High blood pressure—Large doses of carbenicillin or ticarcillin may make these conditions worse, because these medicines contain a large amount of salt Cystic fibrosis—Patients with cystic fibrosis may have an increased chance of fever and skin rash when receiving piperacillin Kidney disease—Patients with kidney disease may have an increased chance of side effects Mononucleosis (”mono”)—Patients with mononucleosis may have an increased chance of skin rash when receiving ampicillin, bacampicillin, or pivampicillin Phenylketonuria—Some strengths of the amoxicillin chewable tablets contain aspartame, which is changed by the body to phenylalanine, a substance that is harmful to patients with phenylketonuria. Stomach or intestinal disease, history of (especially colitis, including colitis caused by antibiotics)—Patients with a history of stomach or intestinal disease may be more likely to develop colitis while taking penicillins Proper Use of penicillin

This section provides information on the proper use of a number of products that contain penicillin. It may not be specific to Ampicillin Sodium. Please read with care.

Penicillins (except bacampicillin tablets, amoxicillin, penicillin V, pivampicillin, and pivmecillinam) are best taken with a full glass (8 ounces) of water on an empty stomach (either 1 hour before or 2 hours after meals) unless otherwise directed by your doctor.

For patients taking amoxicillin, penicillin V, pivampicillin, and pivmecillinam:

Amoxicillin, penicillin V, pivampicillin, and pivmecillinam may be taken on a full or empty stomach. The liquid form of amoxicillin may also be taken by itself or mixed with formulas, milk, fruit juice, water, ginger ale, or other cold drinks. If mixed with other liquids, take immediately after mixing. Be sure to drink all the liquid to get the full dose of medicine.

For patients taking bacampicillin:

The liquid form of this medicine is best taken with a full glass (8 ounces) of water on an empty stomach (either 1 hour before or 2 hours after meals) unless otherwise directed by your doctor. The tablet form of this medicine may be taken on a full or empty stomach.

For patients taking penicillin G by mouth:

Do not drink acidic fruit juices (for example, orange or grapefruit juice) or other acidic beverages within 1 hour of taking penicillin G since this may keep the medicine from working properly.

For patients taking the oral liquid form of penicillins:

This medicine is to be taken by mouth even if it comes in a dropper bottle. If this medicine does not come in a dropper bottle, use a specially marked measuring spoon or other device to measure each dose accurately. The average household teaspoon may not hold the right amount of liquid. Do not use after the expiration date on the label. The medicine may not work properly after that date. If you have any questions about this, check with your pharmacist.

For patients taking the chewable tablet form of amoxicillin:

Tablets should be chewed or crushed before they are swallowed.

To help clear up your infection completely, keep taking this medicine for the full time of treatment, even if you begin to feel better after a few days. If you have a ”strep” infection, you should keep taking this medicine for at least 10 days. This is especially important in ”strep” infections. Serious heart problems could develop later if your infection is not cleared up completely. Also, if you stop taking this medicine too soon, your symptoms may return.

This medicine works best when there is a constant amount in the blood or urine. To help keep the amount constant, do not miss any doses. Also, it is best to take the doses at evenly spaced times, day and night . For example, if you are to take four doses a day, the doses should be spaced about 6 hours apart. If this interferes with your sleep or other daily activities, or if you need help in planning the best times to take your medicine, check with your health care professional.

Make certain your health care professional knows if you are on a low-sodium (low-salt) diet. Some of these medicines contain enough sodium to cause problems in some people.

Dosing

The dose medicines in this class will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of these medicines. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

The number of tablets or teaspoonfuls of suspension that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are taking a penicillin.

For amoxicillin: For bacterial infections: For oral dosage forms (capsules, oral suspension, tablets, and chewable tablets): Adults, teenagers, and children weighing more than 40 kilograms (kg) (88 pounds)—250 to 500 milligrams (mg) every eight hours or 500 to 875 mg every twelve hours, depending on the type and severity of the infection. Neonates and infants up to 3 months of age—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 15 mg per kg (6.8 mg per pound) of body weight or less every twelve hours. Infants 3 months of age and older and children weighing up to 40 kg (88 lbs.)—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 6.7 to 13.3 mg per kg (3 to 6 mg per pound) of body weight every eight hours or 12.5 to 22.5 mg per kg (5.7 to 10.2 mg per pound) of body weight every twelve hours. For duodenal ulcers (associated with Helicobacter pylori bacterial infection): For oral dosage forms (capsules, oral suspension, tablets, and chewable tablets): Adults: 1000 mg twice a day every twelve hours for fourteen days, along with the two other medicines, clarithromycin and lansoprazole, as directed by your doctor. Teenagers and children: Use and dose must be determined by your doctor. For dual medicine therapy— Adults: 1000 mg three times a day every eight hours for fourteen days, along with the other medicine, lansoprazole, as directed by your doctor. Teenagers and children: Use and dose must be determined by your doctor. For ampicillin: For bacterial infections: For oral dosage forms (capsules and oral suspension): Adults, teenagers, and children weighing more than 20 kilograms (kg) (44 pounds)—250 to 500 milligrams (mg) every six hours. Infants and children weighing up to 20 kg (44 pounds)—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 12.5 to 25 mg per kg (5.7 to 11.4 mg per pound) of body weight every six hours; or 16.7 to 33.3 mg per kg (7.6 to 15 mg per pound) of body weight every eight hours. For injection dosage form: Adults, teenagers, and children weighing more than 20 kg (44 pounds)—250 to 500 mg, injected into a vein or muscle every three to six hours. Infants and children weighing up to 20 kg (44 pounds)—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 12.5 mg per kg (5.7 mg per pound) of body weight, injected into a vein or muscle every six hours. For bacampicillin: For bacterial infections: For oral dosage forms (oral suspension and tablets): Adults, teenagers, and children weighing more than 25 kilograms (kg) (55 pounds)—400 to 800 milligrams (mg) every twelve hours. Children weighing up to 25 kg (55 pounds)—Bacampicillin tablets are not recommended for use in children weighing up to 25 kg (55 pounds). The dose of the oral suspension is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 12.5 to 25 mg per kg (5.7 to 11.4 mg per pound) of body weight every twelve hours. For carbenicillin: For bacterial infections: For oral dosage form (tablets): Adults and teenagers—500 milligrams (mg) to 1 gram every six hours. Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor. For injection dosage form: Adults and teenagers—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 50 to 83.3 mg per kilogram (kg) (22.8 to 37.9 mg per pound) of body weight, injected into a vein or muscle every four hours. Older infants and children—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 16.7 to 75 mg per kg (7.6 to 34 mg per pound) of body weight, injected into a vein or muscle every four to six hours. For cloxacillin: For bacterial infections: For oral dosage form (capsules and oral solution): Adults, teenagers, and children weighing more than 20 kilograms (kg) (44 pounds)—250 to 500 milligrams (mg) every six hours. Infants and children weighing up to 20 kg (44 pounds)—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 6.25 to 12.5 mg per kg (2.8 to 5.7 mg per pound) of body weight every six hours. For injection dosage form: Adults, teenagers, and children weighing more than 20 kg—250 to 500 mg, injected into a vein every six hours. Infants and children weighing up to 20 kg (44 pounds)—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 6.25 to 12.5 mg per kg (2.8 to 5.7 mg per pound) of body weight, injected into a vein every six hours. For dicloxacillin: For bacterial infections: For oral dosage form (capsules and oral suspension): Adults, teenagers, and children weighing more than 40 kilograms (kg) (88 pounds)—125 to 250 milligrams (mg) every six hours. Infants and children weighing up to 40 kg (88 pounds)—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 3.1 to 6.2 mg per kg (1.4 to 2.8 mg per pound) of body weight every six hours. For flucloxacillin: For bacterial infections: For oral dosage form (capsules and oral suspension): Adults, teenagers, and children more than 12 years of age and weighing more than 40 kilograms (kg) (88 pounds)—250 to 500 milligrams (mg) every six hours. Children less than 12 years of age and weighing up to 40 kg (88 pounds)—125 to 250 mg every six hours; or 6.25 to 12.5 mg per kg (2.8 to 5.7 mg per pound) of body weight every six hours. Infants up to 6 months of age—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 6.25 mg per kg (2.8 mg per pound) of body weight every six hours. For methicillin: For bacterial infections: For injection dosage form: Adults, teenagers, and children weighing more than 40 kilograms (kg) (88 pounds)—1 gram injected into a muscle every four to six hours; or 1 gram injected into a vein every six hours. Children weighing up to 40 kg (88 pounds)—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 25 milligrams (mg) per kg (11.4 mg per pound) of body weight, injected into a vein or muscle every six hours. For mezlocillin: For bacterial infections: For injection dosage form: Adults and teenagers—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 33.3 to 87.5 milligrams (mg) per kilogram (kg) (15.1 to 39.8 mg per pound) of body weight, injected into a vein or muscle every four to six hours; or 3 to 4 grams every four to six hours. Infants over 1 month of age and children up to 12 years of age—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 50 mg per kg (22.7 mg per pound) of body weight, injected into a vein or muscle every four hours. For nafcillin: For bacterial infections: For oral dosage form (capsules and tablets): Adults and teenagers—250 milligrams (mg) to 1 gram every four to six hours. Older infants and children—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 6.25 to 12.5 mg per kilogram (kg) (2.8 to 5.7 mg per pound) of body weight every six hours. Newborns—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 10 mg per kg (4.5 mg per pound) of body weight every six to eight hours. For injection dosage form: Adults and teenagers—500 mg to 2 grams injected into a vein or muscle every four to six hours. Infants and children—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 10 to 25 mg per kg (4.5 to 11.4 mg per pound) of body weight, injected into a muscle every twelve hours; or 10 to 40 mg per kg (4.5 to 18.2 mg per pound) of body weight, injected into a vein every four to eight hours. For oxacillin: For bacterial infections: For oral dosage form (capsules and oral solution): Adults, teenagers, and children weighing more than 40 kilograms (kg) (88 pounds)—500 milligrams (mg) to 1 gram every four to six hours. Children weighing up to 40 kg (88 pounds)—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 12.5 to 25 mg per kg (5.7 to 11.4 mg per pound) of body weight every six hours. For injection dosage form: Adults, teenagers, and children weighing more than 40 kg (88 pounds)—250 mg to 1 gram injected into a vein or muscle every four to six hours. Children weighing up to 40 kg (88 pounds)—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 12.5 to 25 mg per kg (5.7 to 11.4 mg per pound) of body weight, injected into a vein or muscle every four to six hours. Premature infants and newborns—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 6.25 mg per kg (2.8 mg per pound) of body weight, injected into a vein or muscle every six hours. For penicillin G: For bacterial infections: For oral dosage form (oral solution, oral suspension, and tablets): Adults and teenagers—200,000 to 500,000 Units (125 to 312 milligrams [mg]) every four to six hours. Infants and children less than 12 years of age—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 4167 to 30,000 Units per kilogram (kg) (189 to 13,636 Units per pound) of body weight every four to eight hours. For benzathine injection dosage form: Adults and teenagers—1,200,000 to 2,400,000 Units injected into a muscle as a single dose. Infants and children—300,000 to 1,200,000 Units injected into a muscle as a single dose; or 50,000 Units per kg (22,727 Units per pound) of body weight injected into a muscle as a single dose. For injection dosage forms (potassium and sodium salts): Adults and teenagers—1,000,000 to 5,000,000 Units, injected into a vein or muscle every four to six hours. Older infants and children—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 8333 to 25,000 Units per kg (3788 to 11,363 Units per pound) of body weight, injected into a vein or muscle every four to six hours. Premature infants and newborns—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 30,000 Units per kg (13,636 Units per pound) of body weight, injected into a vein or muscle every twelve hours. For procaine injection dosage form: Adults and teenagers—600,000 to 1,200,000 Units injected into a muscle once a day. Children—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 50,000 Units per kg (22,727 Units per pound) of body weight, injected into a muscle once a day. For penicillin V: For bacterial infections: For the benzathine salt oral dosage form (oral solution): Adults and teenagers—200,000 to 500,000 Units every six to eight hours. Children—100,000 to 250,000 Units every six to eight hours. For the potassium salt oral dosage forms (oral solution, oral suspension, and tablets): Adults and teenagers—125 to 500 milligrams (mg) every six to eight hours. Children—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 2.5 to 16.7 mg per kilogram (kg) (1.1 to 7.6 mg per pound) of body weight every four to eight hours. For piperacillin: For bacterial infections: For injection dosage form: Adults and teenagers—3 to 4 grams, injected into a vein or muscle every four to six hours. Infants and children—Dose must be determined by your doctor. For pivampicillin: For bacterial infections: For oral dosage form (oral suspension): Adults, teenagers, and children 10 years of age and older—525 to 1050 milligrams (mg) two times a day. Children 7 to 10 years of age—350 mg two times a day. Children 4 to 6 years of age—262.5 mg two times a day. Children 1 to 3 years of age—175 mg two times a day. Infants 3 to 12 months of age—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 20 to 30 mg per kilogram (kg) (9.1 to 13.6 mg per pound) of body weight two times a day. For oral dosage form (tablets): Adults, teenagers, and children 10 years of age and older—500 mg to 1 gram two times a day. Children up to 10 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor. For pivmecillinam: For bacterial infections: For oral dosage form (tablets): Adults, teenagers, and children weighing more than 40 kilograms (kg) (88 pounds)—200 milligrams (mg) two to four times a day for three days. Children up to 40 kg (88 pounds)—Dose must be determined by your doctor. For ticarcillin: For bacterial infections: For injection dosage form: Adults, teenagers, and children weighing more than 40 kilograms (kg) (88 pounds)—3 grams injected into a vein every four hours; or 4 grams injected into a vein every six hours. Children up to 40 kg (88 pounds)—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 33.3 to 75 milligrams (mg) per kg (15 to 34 mg per pound) of body weight, injected into a vein every four to six hours. Missed Dose

If you miss a dose of this medicine, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not double doses.

Storage

Store the medicine in a closed container at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and direct light. Keep from freezing.

Keep out of the reach of children.

Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed.

Precautions While Using Ampicillin Sodium

If your symptoms do not improve within a few days, or if they become worse, check with your doctor.

Penicillins may cause diarrhea in some patients.

Check with your doctor if severe diarrhea occurs. Severe diarrhea may be a sign of a serious side effect. Do not take any diarrhea medicine without first checking with your doctor. Diarrhea medicines may make your diarrhea worse or make it last longer. For mild diarrhea, diarrhea medicine containing kaolin or attapulgite (e.g., Kaopectate tablets, Diasorb) may be taken. However, other kinds of diarrhea medicine should not be taken. They may make your diarrhea worse or make it last longer. If you have any questions about this or if mild diarrhea continues or gets worse, check with your health care professional.

Oral contraceptives (birth control pills) containing estrogen may not work properly if you take them while you are taking ampicillin, amoxicillin, or penicillin V. Unplanned pregnancies may occur. You should use a different or additional means of birth control while you are taking any of these penicillins. If you have any questions about this, check with your health care professional.

For diabetic patients:

Penicillins may cause false test results with some urine sugar tests. Check with your doctor before changing your diet or the dosage of your diabetes medicine.

Before you have any medical tests, tell the doctor in charge that you are taking this medicine. The results of some tests may be affected by this medicine.

Ampicillin Sodium Side Effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Stop taking this medicine and get emergency help immediately if any of the following effects occur:

Less common Fast or irregular breathing fever joint pain lightheadedness or fainting (sudden) puffiness or swelling around the face red, scaly skin shortness of breath skin rash, hives, itching

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

Rare Abdominal or stomach cramps and pain (severe) abdominal tenderness convulsions (seizures) decreased amount of urine diarrhea (watery and severe), which may also be bloody mental depression nausea and vomiting pain at place of injection sore throat and fever unusual bleeding or bruising yellow eyes or skin Rare - For penicillin G procaine only Agitation or combativeness anxiety confusion fear of impending death feeling, hearing, or seeing things that are not real

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

More common Diarrhea (mild) headache sore mouth or tongue vaginal itching and discharge white patches in the mouth and/or on the tongue

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Ampicillin Sodium side effects (in more detail)

The information contained in the Thomson Reuters Micromedex products as delivered by Drugs.com is intended as an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment. It is not a substitute for a medical exam, nor does it replace the need for services provided by medical professionals. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before taking any prescription or over the counter drugs (including any herbal medicines or supplements) or following any treatment or regimen. Only your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist can provide you with advice on what is safe and effective for you.

The use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products is at your sole risk. These products are provided "AS IS" and "as available" for use, without warranties of any kind, either express or implied. Thomson Reuters Healthcare and Drugs.com make no representation or warranty as to the accuracy, reliability, timeliness, usefulness or completeness of any of the information contained in the products. Additionally, THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE MAKES NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTIES AS TO THE OPINIONS OR OTHER SERVICE OR DATA YOU MAY ACCESS, DOWNLOAD OR USE AS A RESULT OF USE OF THE THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS. ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR USE ARE HEREBY EXCLUDED. Thomson Reuters Healthcare does not assume any responsibility or risk for your use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products.

More Ampicillin Sodium resources Ampicillin Sodium Side Effects (in more detail) Ampicillin Sodium Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Ampicillin Sodium Drug Interactions Ampicillin Sodium Support Group 11 Reviews for Ampicillin Sodium - Add your own review/rating Compare Ampicillin Sodium with other medications Actinomycosis Anthrax Anthrax Prophylaxis Aspiration Pneumonia Bacterial Infection Clostridial Infection Congenital Syphilis Cutaneous Bacillus anthracis Deep Neck Infection Diphtheria Endocarditis Fusospirochetosis, Trench Mouth Joint Infection Leptospirosis Lyme Disease, Arthritis Lyme Disease, Carditis Lyme Disease, Erythema Chronicum Migrans Lyme Disease, Neurologic Meningitis Meningitis, Meningococcal Meningitis, Pneumococcal Neurosyphilis Otitis Media Pneumonia Prevention of Perinatal Group B Streptococcal Disease Rat-bite Fever Rheumatic Fever Prophylaxis Skin Infection Strep Throat Syphilis, Early Syphilis, Latent Tertiary Syphilis Tonsillitis/Pharyngitis Upper Respiratory Tract Infection
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Canesten Topical


Generic Name: clotrimazole (Topical route)

kloe-TRIM-a-zole

Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

Clotrim Antifungal Cruex Prescription Strength Lotrimin Lotrimin AF Mycelex

In Canada

Canesten Clotrimaderm Desenex Myclo-Derm Neo-Zol

Available Dosage Forms:

Lotion Solution Cream

Therapeutic Class: Antifungal

Chemical Class: Imidazole

Uses For Canesten

Clotrimazole topical preparations are used to treat fungus infections on the skin.

This medicine is available both over-the-counter (OTC) and with your doctor's prescription.

Before Using Canesten

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this medicine, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

This medicine has been tested in children and, in effective doses, has not been shown to cause different side effects or problems than it does in adults.

Geriatric

Many medicines have not been studied specifically in older people. Therefore, it may not be known whether they work exactly the same way they do in younger adults. Although there is no specific information comparing use of topical clotrimazole in the elderly with use in other age groups, this medicine is not expected to cause different side effects or problems in older people than it does in younger adults.

Pregnancy Pregnancy Category Explanation All Trimesters C Animal studies have shown an adverse effect and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR no animal studies have been conducted and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women. Breast Feeding

There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking this medicine, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines may cause an increased risk of certain side effects, but using both drugs may be the best treatment for you. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

Fentanyl Tacrolimus Trimetrexate Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Proper Use of clotrimazole

This section provides information on the proper use of a number of products that contain clotrimazole. It may not be specific to Canesten. Please read with care.

Apply enough clotrimazole to cover the affected and surrounding skin areas, and rub in gently.

Keep this medicine away from the eyes.

When clotrimazole is used to treat certain types of fungus infections of the skin, an occlusive dressing (airtight covering, such as kitchen plastic wrap) should not be applied over the medicine. To do so may cause irritation of the skin. Do not apply an occlusive dressing over this medicine unless you have been directed to do so by your doctor.

To help clear up your infection completely, it is very important that you keep using this medicine for the full time of treatment , even if your symptoms begin to clear up after a few days. Since fungus infections may be very slow to clear up, you may have to continue using this medicine every day for several weeks or more. If you stop using this medicine too soon, your symptoms may return. Do not miss any doses .

Dosing

The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

For topical dosage forms (cream, lotion, and solution): Fungal infections (treatment): Adults and children—Use two times a day, morning and evening. Missed Dose

If you miss a dose of this medicine, apply it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule.

Storage

Store the medicine in a closed container at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and direct light. Keep from freezing.

Keep out of the reach of children.

Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed.

Precautions While Using Canesten

If your skin problem does not improve within 4 weeks, or if it becomes worse, check with your doctor.

Canesten Side Effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor as soon as possible if any of the following side effects occur:

Skin rash, hives, blistering, burning, itching, peeling, redness, stinging, swelling, or other sign of skin irritation not present before use of this medicine

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Canesten Topical side effects (in more detail)

The information contained in the Thomson Reuters Micromedex products as delivered by Drugs.com is intended as an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment. It is not a substitute for a medical exam, nor does it replace the need for services provided by medical professionals. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before taking any prescription or over the counter drugs (including any herbal medicines or supplements) or following any treatment or regimen. Only your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist can provide you with advice on what is safe and effective for you.

The use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products is at your sole risk. These products are provided "AS IS" and "as available" for use, without warranties of any kind, either express or implied. Thomson Reuters Healthcare and Drugs.com make no representation or warranty as to the accuracy, reliability, timeliness, usefulness or completeness of any of the information contained in the products. Additionally, THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE MAKES NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTIES AS TO THE OPINIONS OR OTHER SERVICE OR DATA YOU MAY ACCESS, DOWNLOAD OR USE AS A RESULT OF USE OF THE THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS. ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR USE ARE HEREBY EXCLUDED. Thomson Reuters Healthcare does not assume any responsibility or risk for your use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products.

More Canesten Topical resources Canesten Topical Side Effects (in more detail) Canesten Topical Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Canesten Topical Support Group 1 Review for Canesten Topical - Add your own review/rating Compare Canesten Topical with other medications Cutaneous Candidiasis Tinea Corporis Tinea Cruris Tinea Pedis Tinea Versicolor
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Estar Topical


Generic Name: coal tar (Topical route)

kole tar

Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

Betatar Gel Cutar Emulsion Denorex DHS Tar Doak Tar Duplex T Fototar Ionil-T Plus Medotar MG 217 Neutrogena T/Derm Neutrogena T/Gel

In Canada

Estar Liquor Carbonis Detergens Psorigel Spectro Tar Skin Wash Tar Distillate

Available Dosage Forms:

Liquid Shampoo Lotion Solution Cream Gel/Jelly Soap Kit Ointment Bar Foam Emulsion

Therapeutic Class: Keratolytic

Uses For Estar

Coal tar is used to treat eczema, psoriasis, seborrheic dermatitis, and other skin disorders.

Some of these preparations are available only with your doctor's prescription.

Before Using Estar

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this medicine, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Coal tar products should not be used on infants, unless otherwise directed by your doctor. Studies on this medicine have been done only in adult patients, and there is no specific information comparing use of this medicine in children with use in other age groups.

Geriatric

Many medicines have not been studied specifically in older people. Therefore, it may not be known whether they work exactly the same way they do in younger adults or if they cause different side effects or problems in older people. There is no specific information comparing use of this medicine in the elderly with use in other age groups.

Breast Feeding

Studies in women suggest that this medication poses minimal risk to the infant when used during breastfeeding.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. Tell your healthcare professional if you are taking any other prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medicine.

Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Proper Use of coal tar

This section provides information on the proper use of a number of products that contain coal tar. It may not be specific to Estar. Please read with care.

Use this medicine only as directed. Do not use more of it and do not use it more often than recommended on the label, unless otherwise directed by your doctor. To do so may increase the chance of side effects.

After applying coal tar, protect the treated area from direct sunlight and do not use a sunlamp for 72 hours, unless otherwise directed by your doctor, since a severe reaction may occur. Also, make sure you have removed all the coal tar medicine from your skin before you go back into direct sunlight or use a sunlamp.

Do not apply this medicine to infected, blistered, raw, or oozing areas of the skin.

Keep this medicine away from the eyes. If you should accidentally get some in your eyes, flush them thoroughly with water at once.

To use the cream or ointment form of this medicine:

Apply enough medicine to cover the affected area, and rub in gently.

To use the gel form of this medicine:

Apply enough gel to cover the affected area, and rub in gently. Allow the gel to remain on the affected area for 5 minutes, then remove excess gel by patting with a clean tissue.

To use the shampoo form of this medicine:

Wet the scalp and hair with lukewarm water. Apply a generous amount of shampoo and rub into the scalp, then rinse. Apply the shampoo again, working up a rich lather, and allow to remain on the scalp for 5 minutes. Then rinse thoroughly.

To use the nonshampoo liquid form of this medicine:

Some of these preparations are to be applied directly to dry or wet skin, some are to be added to lukewarm bath water, and some may be applied directly to dry or wet skin or added to lukewarm bath water. Make sure you know exactly how you should use this medicine. If you have any questions about this, check with your health care professional. If this medicine is to be applied directly to the skin, apply enough to cover the affected area, and rub in gently. Some of these preparations contain alcohol and are flammable. Do not use near heat, near open flame, or while smoking. Dosing

The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

For eczema, psoriasis, seborrheic dermatitis, and other skin disorders: For cleansing bar dosage form: Adults—Use one or two times a day, or as directed by your doctor. Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor. For cream dosage form: Adults—Apply to the affected area(s) of the skin up to four times a day. Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor. For gel dosage form: Adults—Apply to the affected area(s) of the skin one or two times a day. Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor. For lotion dosage form: Adults—Apply directly to the affected area(s) of the skin or use as a bath, hand or foot soak, or as a hair rinse, depending on the product. Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor. For ointment dosage form: Adults—Apply to the affected area(s) of the skin two or three times a day. Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor. For shampoo dosage form: Adults—Use once a day to once a week or as directed by your doctor. Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor. For topical solution dosage form: Adults—Apply to wet the skin or scalp, or use as a bath, depending on the product. Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor. For topical suspension dosage form: Adults—Use as a bath. Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor. Missed Dose

If you miss a dose of this medicine, apply it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule.

Storage

Store the medicine in a closed container at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and direct light. Keep from freezing.

Keep out of the reach of children.

Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed.

Precautions While Using Estar

If this medicine is used on the scalp, it may temporarily discolor blond, bleached, or tinted hair.

Coal tar may stain the skin or clothing. Avoid getting it on your clothing. The stain on the skin will wear off after you stop using the medicine.

Estar Side Effects

In animal studies, coal tar has been shown to increase the chance of skin cancer.

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor as soon as possible if any of the following side effects occur:

Rare Skin irritation not present before use of this medicine skin rash

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

More common Stinging (mild)—especially for gel and solution dosage forms

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

The information contained in the Thomson Reuters Micromedex products as delivered by Drugs.com is intended as an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment. It is not a substitute for a medical exam, nor does it replace the need for services provided by medical professionals. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before taking any prescription or over the counter drugs (including any herbal medicines or supplements) or following any treatment or regimen. Only your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist can provide you with advice on what is safe and effective for you.

The use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products is at your sole risk. These products are provided "AS IS" and "as available" for use, without warranties of any kind, either express or implied. Thomson Reuters Healthcare and Drugs.com make no representation or warranty as to the accuracy, reliability, timeliness, usefulness or completeness of any of the information contained in the products. Additionally, THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE MAKES NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTIES AS TO THE OPINIONS OR OTHER SERVICE OR DATA YOU MAY ACCESS, DOWNLOAD OR USE AS A RESULT OF USE OF THE THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS. ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR USE ARE HEREBY EXCLUDED. Thomson Reuters Healthcare does not assume any responsibility or risk for your use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products.

More Estar Topical resources Estar Topical Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Estar Topical Support Group 0 Reviews for Estar Topical - Add your own review/rating Compare Estar Topical with other medications Dermatitis Psoriasis Seborrheic Dermatitis
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Aluminum Chloride Hexahydrate topical


Class: Astringents
VA Class: DE450
Chemical Name: Aluminum chloride, hexahydrate
Molecular Formula: AlCl3•6H2O
CAS Number: 7784-13-6, 7446-70-0
Brands: Certain Dri, Drysol, Hypercare, Xerac AC

Introduction

Antiperspirant.2 11 13 14 15

Uses for Aluminum Chloride Hexahydrate Hyperhidrosis

Topical treatment of hyperhidrosis.1 2 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 13 14 15

Hyperhidrosis (excessive sweating) may be primary (physiologic, idiopathic, essential; possibly hereditary) or secondary (associated with an underlying condition).5 7 8 9 10 14 Secondary hyperhidrosis is associated with neurologic, endocrinologic, metabolic, or other such disorders; febrile illness; malignancy; or drugs.5 7 8 9 10 14

Hyperhidrosis is classified as focal or generalized.5 Focal hyperhidrosis most commonly affects the palms and soles (palmar-plantar hyperhidrosis) and underarms (axillary hyperhidrosis), and least commonly affects the face (craniofacial hyperhidrosis).5 7 8 9 10 14 Generalized hyperhidrosis involves the entire body and usually is associated with an underlying condition.10

Generally considered first-line therapy for mild or moderate primary focal hyperhidrosis, including axillary5 7 8 10 11 13 14 and palmar-plantar hyperhidrosis.7 8 10 11 14 An adequate trial of topical aluminum chloride usually is recommended before other therapeutic options (e.g., botulinum toxin injections, iontophoresis, local excision, liposuction, sympathectomy) considered.7 8 9 10 11 In severe cases of axillary, palmar, or plantar hyperhidrosis, some clinicians state that aluminum chloride hexahydrate, botulinum toxin injections, or iontophoresis are considered first-line therapy.8

One of several options for treatment of craniofacial hyperhidrosis.1 7 8

Self-medication (Certain Dri, OTC use) for axillary hyperhidrosis only.15

Aluminum Chloride Hexahydrate Dosage and Administration Administration Topical Administration

Preparations are for external use only.1 2 4 15

Apply topically to the skin as a solution1 2 4 or as an antiperspirant stick.15

Avoid contact with eyes.1 2 4 7 15 If contact occurs, wash affected eye(s) thoroughly with water.1 2

Apply to dry, intact skin only; do not apply to any irritated, broken, or recently shaven areas.1 2 4 5 6 7 8 9 11 15 May use a hairdryer on warm setting to dry the skin.1 2

Do not apply other deodorants or antiperspirants to treatment area.1 2

For optimum effect, apply at bedtime when sweat glands are least active.1 2 4 8 9 10 11 13 15

Apply solution using fingers, moistened cotton ball, or applicator (Dab-O-Matic) supplied by manufacturer.1 2 4 If using the Dab-O-Matic applicator, remove and discard protective cap prior to use.1 2 4 Push applicator into bottle and twist white cap to secure in place.2 4

Consult individual manufacturer’s prescribing or patient information for complete instructions regarding proper drug application and removal.1 2 4 7 15

Dosage Adults Hyperhidrosis Axillary, Palmar, Plantar, or Craniofacial Hyperhidrosis Topical

Apply solution to completely dry affected area (e.g., underarms, palms, soles, scalp) once daily at bedtime.1 2 4 5 7 8 9 11

To minimize irritation when using the solution, let alcohol evaporate1 2 (may use a hairdryer on cold setting when administered under arms);1 a thin film of drug should remain on skin.1 2

To prevent drug from rubbing off, cover treated area with a T-shirt for axillary application;1 2 4 5 use a plastic shower cap for scalp application1 5 or plastic wrap and overlying gloves or socks for palmar or plantar application, respectively.1 4 5 14 Do not use adhesive tape.1 4 Some clinicians state that occlusion is not necessary and may increase risk of skin irritation.9 11 (See Dermatologic Effects under Cautions.)

After 6–8 hours (usually the following morning), remove garments and/or plastic wrap; to prevent irritation, wash treatment area(s) thoroughly with soap and water or shampoo.1 2 4 5 6 7 9 10 14 Some clinicians also suggest topical application of sodium bicarbonate.6 Dry with towel.1

Repeat applications for ?2 consecutive nights until desired effect (lack of sweating) achieved.1 4 5 6 7 9 11 Thereafter, may apply additional treatments once or twice weekly as needed.1 4 5 9

Self-medication for Axillary Hyperhidrosis Topical

Apply sparingly (i.e., a few strokes) to affected areas under each arm.15 Dry skin completely prior to application.15

Allow solution to dry following application.15

May repeat treatment until desired effect achieved.15 Thereafter, apply every other day or as needed.15

Cautions for Aluminum Chloride Hexahydrate Contraindications

Known hypersensitivity to aluminum chloride hexahydrate or any ingredient in the formulation.6

Warnings/Precautions Warnings Administration

Self-medication: Apply Certain Dri to underarms only.15 (For further information on warnings and precautions associated with administration of aluminum chloride hexahydrate (Drysol, Xerac AC, and Hypercare) and aluminum chloride [Certain Dri], see Topical Administration under Dosage and Administration.)

Flammability

Aluminum chloride solutions are flammable; do not use near an open flame.1 2 4

Sensitivity Reactions Dermatologic Effects

Possible local irritation (e.g., burning, stinging, itching, tingling);1 2 4 7 8 10 13 14 usually resolves with temporary discontinuance of drug.1 2 4 Because risk of skin sensitivity increases with higher concentrations, some patients may benefit from an initial trial with reduced concentrations (10–12%) of aluminum chloride hexahydrate.7 8

To minimize skin irritation, follow specific instructions provided by each manufacturer on proper drug application and removal.1 2 4 7 10 Ensure that skin is completely dry prior to and following drug application.1 2 4 5 7 9 11 15 (See Topical Administration under Dosage and Administration.)

If rash or skin reaction develops during therapy, discontinue use and consult a clinician.1 2 4 15 Topical sodium bicarbonate or a low-dose corticosteroid cream (e.g., 1% hydrocortisone) may be used to limit or treat irritation.6 7 9 11 14 Other measures include decreasing concentration or frequency of applications.7 If persistent skin irritation occurs, refer patient to a dermatologist.7

General Precautions Fabric or Metal Stains

May be harmful to certain fabrics (e.g., cotton) or metals.1 2 4 11 13 15 Allow skin to dry completely following application and thoroughly wash off any residual drug after 6–8 hours of treatment to avoid damage to clothing.1 15

Specific Populations Pregnancy

The manufacturer of Drysol and Xerac AC states that there is no pregnancy category for these drugs; however, they recommend that the drug not be used in pregnant women.3

Pediatric Use

Keep preparations out of reach of children.1 2 4 15 16

Infants (especially preterm infants) and children may be at greater risk of aluminum exposure because of immature renal function.16

Renal Impairment

Possible increased exposure to any systemically absorbed aluminum in patients with renal impairment; patients with renal impairment should consult a clinician before use.16 (See Bioavailability and Special Populations under Pharmacokinetics.)

Common Adverse Effects

Local skin irritation (burning, stinging, itching, tingling).1 7 8 10 11 13 14

Aluminum Chloride Hexahydrate Pharmacokinetics Absorption Bioavailability

One manufacturer states that drug is not absorbed; however, some clinicians state that minimal systemic absorption may occur when applied topically.16 17

Onset

Following topical application of aluminum chloride hexahydrate 20% solution to the palms, reduced sweating occurs within 48 hours.10 14

Duration

Following topical application of aluminum chloride hexahydrate 20% to the palms, effects of reduced sweating diminish or disappear within 48 hours after discontinuance of therapy.10 14

Elimination Elimination Route

Absorbed aluminum is eliminated principally by the kidneys.17

Special Populations

Renal impairment: Possible decreased clearance and increased exposure to any absorbed aluminum.16 17

Stability Storage Topical Solution

15–30°C,4 in tightly closed container when not in use (to prevent evaporation).1 2 4

Keep away from open flames.1 2 4

ActionsActions

Pathophysiology of focal hyperhidrosis is poorly understood.8 10

Eccrine (sweat) glands are distributed over nearly the entire body surface with high concentrations in palms, soles, and forehead.8 These glands are innervated by cholinergic fibers of the sympathetic nervous system.8 9 10

Since patients with focal hyperhidrosis do not have any histopathologic changes in sweat glands or in their numbers, it has been suggested that a complex dysfunction of the sympathetic nervous system is likely to contribute to hyperhidrosis.8 10

Mechanically blocks eccrine sweat gland ducts,5 6 7 9 10 12 13 14 possibly by forming aluminum ion precipitate complexes within the acrosyringium (most superficial) portion of eccrine glands.12

Long-term (?6 months) use appears to cause dilation and atrophy of secretory cells within eccrine sweat glands.5 12 13 14

Does not appear to affect apocrine glands.12

Advice to Patients

Importance of avoiding contact with eyes.1 2 4 15 If ocular contact occurs, rinse eye(s) thoroughly with water.1 2

Importance of instructing patients on proper technique for application and removal of drug.1 2 4 7 15

Importance of discontinuing therapy and informing clinician if a rash or skin reaction occurs.1 2 4 15

Importance of patients with renal impairment consulting a clinician before starting or continuing to use antiperspirants containing aluminum because of possible increased exposure to any absorbed aluminum.16

Importance of informing clinician if accidental ingestion occurs in a pediatric patient.16

Importance of women informing clinicians if they are or plan to become pregnant or plan to breast-feed.1 2 4 15

Importance of informing clinicians of existing or contemplated concomitant therapy, including prescription and OTC drugs.1 2 4 15

Importance of informing patients of other important precautionary information.1 2 4 15 (See Cautions.)

Preparations

Excipients in commercially available drug preparations may have clinically important effects in some individuals; consult specific product labeling for details.

Aluminum Chloride

Routes

Dosage Forms

Strengths

Brand Names

Manufacturer

Topical

Stick

12%

Certain Dri

DSE Healthcare Solutions

Aluminum Chloride Hexahydrate

Routes

Dosage Forms

Strengths

Brand Names

Manufacturer

Topical

Solution

6.25%

Xerac AC (with anhydrous ethyl alcohol 96%)

Person and Covey

20%

Drysol (with anhydrous ethyl alcohol 93%)

Person and Covey

Hypercare

Stratus

Disclaimer

This report on medications is for your information only, and is not considered individual patient advice. Because of the changing nature of drug information, please consult your physician or pharmacist about specific clinical use.

The American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. and Drugs.com represent that the information provided hereunder was formulated with a reasonable standard of care, and in conformity with professional standards in the field. The American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. and Drugs.com make no representations or warranties, express or implied, including, but not limited to, any implied warranty of merchantability and/or fitness for a particular purpose, with respect to such information and specifically disclaims all such warranties. Users are advised that decisions regarding drug therapy are complex medical decisions requiring the independent, informed decision of an appropriate health care professional, and the information is provided for informational purposes only. The entire monograph for a drug should be reviewed for a thorough understanding of the drug's actions, uses and side effects. The American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. and Drugs.com do not endorse or recommend the use of any drug. The information is not a substitute for medical care.

AHFS Drug Information. © Copyright, 1959-2011, Selected Revisions March 2009. American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc., 7272 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, Maryland 20814.

References

1. Person and Covey, Inc. Drysol (aluminum chloride hexahydrate) solution prescribing information. Glendale, CA; 2001 Sep 27.

2. Person and Covey, Inc. Xerac AC (aluminum chloride hexahydrate) solution prescribing information. Glendale, CA; 2001 Sep 24.

3. Person and Covey, Glendale,CA: Personal communication.

4. Stratus Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Hypercare (aluminum chloride hexahydrate) solution prescribing information. Miami, FL; undated.

5. Eisenach JH, Atkinson JLD, Fealey RD. Hyperhidrosis: evolving therapies for a well-established phenomenon. Mayo Clin Proc. 2005; 80:657-66. [PubMed 15887434]

6. Thomas I, Brown J, Vafaie J et al. Palmoplantar hyperhidrosis: a therapeutic challenge. Am Fam Physician. 2004; 69:1117-20. [PubMed 15023010]

7. Hornberger J, Grimes K, Naumann M et al. Recognition, diagnosis, and treatment of primary focal hyperhidrosis. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2004; 51:274-86. [PubMed 15280848]

8. Solish N, Bertucci V, Dansereau A et al. A comprehensive approach to the recognition, diagnosis, and severity-based treatment of focal hyperhidrosis: recommendations of the Canadian hyperhidrosis advisory committee. Dermatol Surg. 2007; 33:908-23. [PubMed 17661933]

9. Stolman LP. Treatment of hyperhidrosis. Dermatol Clin. 1998; 16:863-9. [PubMed 9891696]

10. Haider A, Solish N. Focal hyperhidrosis: diagnosis and management. CMAJ. 2005; 172:69-75. [PubMed 15632408]

11. International Hyperhidrosis Society. Hyperhidrosis treatments, antiperspirants. From the IHS Website (www.sweathelp.org/English/PFF_Treatment_Antiperspirants.asp). Accessed January 14, 2008.

12. H?lzle E, Braun-Falco O. Structural changes in axillary eccrine glands following long-term treatment with aluminum chloride hexahydrate solution. Br J Dermatol. 1984; 110:399-403.

13. T?gel B, Greve B, Raulin C. Current therapeutic strategies for hyperhidrosis: a review. Eur J Dermatol. 2002; 12:219-23.

14. Connolly M, de Berker D. Management of primary hyperhidrosis, a summary of the different treatment modalities. Am J Clin Dermatol. 2003; 4:681-97. [PubMed 14507230]

15. DSE Healthcare Solutions, LLC. Certain Dri (aluminum chloride) anti-perspirant patient information. Edison, NJ; 2006 Mar.

16. Food and Drug Administration. Antiperspirant drug products for over-the-counter human use; final monograph. 21 CFR Parts 310, 350 and 369. Final Rule. [Docket No. 78N-0064] Fed Regist. 2003; 68:34273-93.

17. Guillard O, Fauconneau B, Olichon D et al. Hyperaluminemia in a woman using an aluminum-containing antiperspirant for 4 years. Am J Med. 2004; 117:956-9. [PubMed 15629736]

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