Class Name: calcium supplement (Oral route, Parenteral route)

Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

Ascocid Cal-C-Caps Cal-G Cal-Lac Citracal PhosLo Posture Prelief Rolaids

In Canada

Calcium Stanley

Available Dosage Forms:

Tablet, Chewable Tablet Powder for Suspension Capsule Capsule, Liquid Filled Syrup Wafer Powder Tablet, Effervescent Suspension Tablet, Extended Release Granule Uses For This Medicine

Calcium supplements are taken by individuals who are unable to get enough calcium in their regular diet or who have a need for more calcium. They are used to prevent or treat several conditions that may cause hypocalcemia (not enough calcium in the blood). The body needs calcium to make strong bones. Calcium is also needed for the heart, muscles, and nervous system to work properly.

The bones serve as a storage site for the body's calcium. They are continuously giving up calcium to the bloodstream and then replacing it as the body's need for calcium changes from day to day. When there is not enough calcium in the blood to be used by the heart and other organs, your body will take the needed calcium from the bones. When you eat foods rich in calcium, the calcium will be restored to the bones and the balance between your blood and bones will be maintained.

Pregnant women, nursing mothers, children, and adolescents may need more calcium than they normally get from eating calcium-rich foods. Adult women may take calcium supplements to help prevent a bone disease called osteoporosis. Osteoporosis, which causes thin, porous, easily broken bones, may occur in women after menopause, but may sometimes occur in elderly men also. Osteoporosis in women past menopause is thought to be caused by a reduced amount of ovarian estrogen (a female hormone). However, a diet low in calcium for many years, especially in the younger adult years, may add to the risk of developing it. Other bone diseases in children and adults are also treated with calcium supplements.

Calcium supplements may also be used for other conditions as determined by your health care professional.

A calcium "salt" contains calcium along with another substance, such as carbonate or gluconate. Some calcium salts have more calcium (elemental calcium) than others. For example, the amount of calcium in calcium carbonate is greater than that in calcium gluconate. To give you an idea of how different calcium supplements vary in calcium content, the following chart explains how many tablets of each type of supplement will provide 1000 milligrams of elemental calcium. When you look for a calcium supplement, be sure the number of milligrams on the label refers to the amount of elemental calcium, and not to the strength of each tablet.

Calcium supplement Strength of each tablet (in milligrams [mg]) Amount of elemental calcium per tablet (in milligrams) Number of tablets to provide 1000 milligrams of calcium Calcium carbonate 625





Generic Name: hyoscyamine (hye oh SYE a meen)



Generic Name: verapamil (oral) (ver AP a mil)



Generic Name: cytomegalovirus immune globulin (CMV IG) (injectable) (sye toe MEH gah loe vye rus ih MUNE GLAW byoo lin)



Generic Name: ibuprofen (Intravenous route)

eye-bue-PROE-fen

Intravenous route(Solution)

NSAIDs increase the risk of serious cardiovascular thrombotic events, myocardial infarction, and stroke, which can be fatal. This risk may be increased in patients with cardiovascular disease or risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Ibuprofen is contraindicated for the treatment of peri-operative pain in the setting of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. NSAIDs can also cause an increased risk of serious gastrointestinal adverse events especially in the elderly, including bleeding, ulceration, and perforation of the stomach or intestines, which can be fatal .

Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

Caldolor Neoprofen

Available Dosage Forms:

Solution

Therapeutic Class: Analgesic

Pharmacologic Class: NSAID

Chemical Class: Propionic Acid (class)

Uses For Caldolor

Ibuprofen injection is a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) that is used alone or together with other medicines (e.g., opioid analgesics) to relieve mild to severe pain. It is also used to treat fever in adults.

This medicine is available only with your doctor's prescription.

Before Using Caldolor

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this medicine, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Appropriate studies have not been performed on the relationship of age to the effects of ibuprofen injection in children and teenagers below 17 years of age. Safety and efficacy have not been established.

Geriatric

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated geriatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of ibuprofen injection in the elderly. However, elderly patients are more likely to have age-related kidney, liver, heart, or stomach problems, which may require an adjustment in the dose for patients receiving ibuprofen injection.

Pregnancy Pregnancy Category Explanation 1st Trimester C Animal studies have shown an adverse effect and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR no animal studies have been conducted and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women. 2nd Trimester C Animal studies have shown an adverse effect and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR no animal studies have been conducted and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women. 3rd Trimester D Studies in pregnant women have demonstrated a risk to the fetus. However, the benefits of therapy in a life threatening situation or a serious disease, may outweigh the potential risk. Breast Feeding

Studies in women suggest that this medication poses minimal risk to the infant when used during breastfeeding.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are receiving this medicine, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is not recommended. Your doctor may decide not to treat you with this medication or change some of the other medicines you take.

Ketorolac Pentoxifylline

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

Abciximab Ardeparin Argatroban Beta Glucan Bivalirudin Certoparin Cilostazol Citalopram Clopidogrel Clovoxamine Dabigatran Etexilate Dalteparin Danaparoid Desirudin Dipyridamole Enoxaparin Escitalopram Femoxetine Flesinoxan Fluoxetine Fluvoxamine Fondaparinux Ginkgo Heparin Lepirudin Methotrexate Nadroparin Nefazodone Parnaparin Paroxetine Pemetrexed Protein C Reviparin Rivaroxaban Sertraline Sibutramine Tacrolimus Ticlopidine Tinzaparin Tirofiban Vilazodone Zimeldine

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines may cause an increased risk of certain side effects, but using both drugs may be the best treatment for you. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

Acebutolol Acetohexamide Alacepril Alprenolol Amikacin Amiloride Arotinolol Aspirin Atenolol Azilsartan Medoxomil Azosemide Befunolol Bemetizide Benazepril Bendroflumethiazide Benzthiazide Betaxolol Bevantolol Bisoprolol Bopindolol Bucindolol Bumetanide Bupranolol Buthiazide Candesartan Cilexetil Canrenoate Captopril Carteolol Carvedilol Celiprolol Chlorothiazide Chlorpropamide Chlorthalidone Cilazapril Clopamide Cyclopenthiazide Cyclosporine Delapril Desipramine Desvenlafaxine Dilevalol Duloxetine Enalaprilat Enalapril Maleate Eprosartan Esmolol Ethacrynic Acid Fosinopril Furosemide Gliclazide Glimepiride Glipizide Gliquidone Glyburide Hydrochlorothiazide Hydroflumethiazide Imidapril Indapamide Irbesartan Labetalol Landiolol Levobetaxolol Levobunolol Lisinopril Lithium Losartan Mepindolol Methyclothiazide Metipranolol Metolazone Metoprolol Milnacipran Moexipril Nadolol Nebivolol Nipradilol Olmesartan Medoxomil Oxprenolol Penbutolol Pentopril Perindopril Phenytoin Pindolol Piretanide Polythiazide Propranolol Quinapril Ramipril Sotalol Spirapril Spironolactone Tacrine Talinolol Tasosartan Telmisartan Temocapril Tertatolol Timolol Tolazamide Tolbutamide Torsemide Trandolapril Triamterene Trichlormethiazide Valsartan Venlafaxine Voriconazole Xipamide Zofenopril Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of this medicine. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

Anemia or Bleeding problems or Congestive heart failure or Edema (fluid retention) or Heart attack, history of or Hypertension (high blood pressure) or Kidney disease or Liver disease or Stomach ulcers or bleeding, history of or Stroke, history of—Use with caution. May make these conditions worse. Aspirin-sensitive asthma or Aspirin sensitivity, history of—Should not use in patients with these conditions. Heart surgery (e.g., coronary artery bypass graft [CABG])—Should not use for pain right before or after surgery in patients with this condition. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)—May cause side effects to become worse. Proper Use of ibuprofen

This section provides information on the proper use of a number of products that contain ibuprofen. It may not be specific to Caldolor. Please read with care.

A nurse or other trained health professional will give you this medicine in a hospital. This medicine is given through a needle placed in one of your veins.

Drink extra fluids so you will pass more urine while you are using this medicine. This will keep your kidneys working well and help prevent kidney problems.

Precautions While Using Caldolor

It is very important that your doctor check your progress while you receive this medicine. This will allow your doctor to see if the medicine is working properly and to decide if you should continue to use it. Blood tests may be needed to check for unwanted effects.

This medicine may increase your risk of having a heart attack or stroke. This is more likely to occur in people who already have heart disease. People who use this medicine for a long time might also have a higher risk.

This medicine may cause bleeding in your stomach or intestines. This problem can happen without warning signs. This is more likely to occur if you have had a stomach ulcer in the past, if you smoke or drink alcohol regularly, are over 60 years of age, are in poor health, or are using certain other medicines (such as steroids or a blood thinner).

Liver problems may occur while you are using this medicine. Stop using this medicine and check with your doctor right away if you are having more than one of these symptoms: abdominal pain or tenderness; clay-colored stools; dark urine; decreased appetite; fever; headache; itching; loss of appetite; nausea and vomiting; skin rash; swelling of the feet or lower legs; unusual tiredness or weakness; or yellow eyes or skin.

This medicine may cause a serious type of allergic reaction called anaphylaxis. Anaphylaxis can be life-threatening and requires immediate medical attention. Call your doctor right away if you have a rash; itching; hoarseness; trouble breathing; trouble swallowing; or any swelling of your hands, face, or mouth after you get the injection.

Serious skin reactions can occur with this medicine. Check with your doctor right away if you have blistering, peeling, or loosening of the skin; red skin lesions; a severe skin rash or acne; sores or ulcers on the skin; or fever or chills while you are using this medicine.

Using this medicine while you are pregnant can harm your unborn baby. If you think you have become pregnant while using the medicine, tell your doctor right away.

Check with your doctor immediately if blurred vision, difficulty in reading, or any other change in vision occurs during or after you receive this medicine. Your doctor may want you to have your eyes checked by an ophthalmologist (eye doctor).

Call your doctor right away if you have confusion, drowsiness, fever, a general feeling of illness, a headache, loss of appetite, nausea, stiff neck or back, or vomiting. These could be symptoms of a serious condition called meningitis.

Tell your doctor if you have unexplained weight gain or edema (fluid retention or body swelling) with this medicine.

Caldolor Side Effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor or nurse immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

More common Abdominal or stomach pain black, tarry stools bleeding gums blurred vision chest pain confusion convulsions cough coughing up blood decreased urine diarrhea difficulty in breathing or swallowing dizziness dizziness, faintness, or lightheadedness when getting up from a lying or sitting position suddenly dry mouth fast heartbeat fat in the stool fever or chills headache increased menstrual flow or vaginal bleeding increased thirst irregular heartbeat irritability loss of appetite lower back or side pain mood changes muscle pain or cramps muscle twitching nausea or vomiting nervousness nosebleeds numbness or tingling in the hands, feet, or lips pain, warmth, or burning in the fingers, toes, and legs painful or difficult urination pale skin paralysis pounding in the ears problems with vision or hearing prolonged bleeding from cuts rapid breathing red or black, tarry stools red or dark brown urine restlessness seizures shortness of breath slow or fast heartbeat sneezing sore throat sores, ulcers, or white spots on the lips or in the mouth sweating swelling of the feet or lower legs swollen glands tightness in the chest troubled breathing with exertion unusual bleeding or bruising unusual tiredness or weakness weakness wheezing Less common Bloating or swelling of the face, arms, hands, lower legs, or feet decrease in frequency of urination decrease in urine volume difficulty in passing urine (dribbling) rapid weight gain unusual weight gain or loss

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

More common Excess air or gas in the stomach or intestines full feeling passing gas Less common Abdominal or stomach discomfort acid or sour stomach belching heartburn indigestion stomach discomfort, upset, or pain

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Caldolor side effects (in more detail)

The information contained in the Thomson Reuters Micromedex products as delivered by Drugs.com is intended as an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment. It is not a substitute for a medical exam, nor does it replace the need for services provided by medical professionals. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before taking any prescription or over the counter drugs (including any herbal medicines or supplements) or following any treatment or regimen. Only your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist can provide you with advice on what is safe and effective for you.

The use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products is at your sole risk. These products are provided "AS IS" and "as available" for use, without warranties of any kind, either express or implied. Thomson Reuters Healthcare and Drugs.com make no representation or warranty as to the accuracy, reliability, timeliness, usefulness or completeness of any of the information contained in the products. Additionally, THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE MAKES NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTIES AS TO THE OPINIONS OR OTHER SERVICE OR DATA YOU MAY ACCESS, DOWNLOAD OR USE AS A RESULT OF USE OF THE THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS. ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR USE ARE HEREBY EXCLUDED. Thomson Reuters Healthcare does not assume any responsibility or risk for your use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products.

More Caldolor resources Caldolor Side Effects (in more detail) Caldolor Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Caldolor Drug Interactions Caldolor Support Group 0 Reviews for Caldolor - Add your own review/rating Caldolor Prescribing Information (FDA) Caldolor Injection MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Caldolor Consumer Overview Ibuprofen Monograph (AHFS DI) Ibuprofen Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Ibuprofen Prescribing Information (FDA) Advil Consumer Overview Advil MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Advil Prescribing Information (FDA) Advil Childrens Prescribing Information (FDA) Advil Migraine Prescribing Information (FDA) IBU MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Ibutilide Fumarate Monograph (AHFS DI) Motrin Consumer Overview Motrin Prescribing Information (FDA) Motrin IB Prescribing Information (FDA) Motrin Junior Strength Chewable Tablets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) NeoProfen Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare Caldolor with other medications Fever Pain Spondylolisthesis



Pronunciation: klor-fen-IHR-ah-meen/fen-il-EF-rin



Pronunciation: KAS-poe-FUN-jin



Pronunciation: KLOE-ni-deen





sef-A-zoe-lin

Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

Ancef

Available Dosage Forms:

Powder for Solution

Therapeutic Class: Antibiotic

Pharmacologic Class: 1st Generation Cephalosporin

Uses For cefazolin

Cefazolin is used to treat bacterial infections in many different parts of the body. cefazolin is also given before certain types of surgery to prevent infections.

Cefazolin belongs to the class of medicines known as cephalosporin antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria or preventing their growth. However, cefazolin will not work for colds, flu, or other virus infections.

cefazolin is available only with your doctor's prescription.

Before Using cefazolin

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For cefazolin, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to cefazolin or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated pediatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of cefazolin in children.

Because of cefazolin's toxicity, use in newborn and premature babies is not recommended.

Geriatric

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated geriatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of cefazolin in the elderly. However, elderly patients are more likely to have age-related kidney problems, which may require caution and an adjustment in the dose for patients receiving cefazolin.

Pregnancy Pregnancy Category Explanation All Trimesters B Animal studies have revealed no evidence of harm to the fetus, however, there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR animal studies have shown an adverse effect, but adequate studies in pregnant women have failed to demonstrate a risk to the fetus. Breast Feeding

Studies in women suggest that this medication poses minimal risk to the infant when used during breastfeeding.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are receiving cefazolin, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using cefazolin with any of the following medicines may cause an increased risk of certain side effects, but using both drugs may be the best treatment for you. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

Warfarin Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of cefazolin. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

Kidney disease—Use with caution. Effects may be increased because of slower removal of the medicine from the body. Kidney disease, severe or Liver disease, severe or Undernourished condition—May be worsened by cefazolin and you may need to take Vitamin K. Stomach or bowel disease (e.g., colitis or severe diarrhea), history of or Seizures—Use with caution. May make these conditions worse. Proper Use of cefazolin

A nurse or other trained health professional will give you cefazolin. cefazolin is given as a shot into one of your muscles or through a needle placed in one of your veins.

Precautions While Using cefazolin

If your symptoms do not improve within a few days, or if they become worse, check with your doctor.

Cefazolin may cause diarrhea, and in some cases it can be severe. Do not take any medicine to treat diarrhea without first checking with your doctor. Diarrhea medicines may make the diarrhea worse or make it last longer. If you have any questions about this or if mild diarrhea continues or gets worse, check with your doctor.

Before you have any medical tests, tell the medical doctor in charge that you are using cefazolin. The results of some tests may be affected by cefazolin.

Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This includes calcium-containing solutions for injection, prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medicines and herbal or vitamin supplements.

cefazolin Side Effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor or nurse immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

Rare Bluish color changes in skin color pain swelling of the foot or leg tenderness Incidence not known Abdominal or stomach cramps or tenderness back, leg, or stomach pains black, tarry stools bleeding gums blistering, peeling, or loosening of the skin bloating blood in the urine or stools bloody or cloudy urine chest pain chills clay-colored stools cloudy urine cough coughing up blood dark urine decrease in urine output or decrease in urine-concentrating ability decreased frequency or amount of urine diarrhea diarrhea, watery and severe, which may also be bloody difficult or painful urination difficulty with breathing or swallowing dizziness excessive muscle tone fast heartbeat feeling of discomfort fever general body swelling general tiredness and weakness headache hives increased blood pressure increased menstrual flow or vaginal bleeding increased thirst inflammation of the joints itching itching of the vagina or genital area joint or muscle pain light-colored stools loss of appetite lower back or side pain muscle aches or stiffness muscle tension or tightness nausea or vomiting nosebleeds pain during sexual intercourse pain, warmth, or burning in the fingers, toes, and legs pale skin paralysis pinpoint red spots on the skin problems with vision or hearing prolonged bleeding from cuts puffiness or swelling of the eyelids or around the eyes, face, lips, or tongue rash red irritated eyes red or black, tarry stools red or dark brown urine red skin lesions, often with a purple center red, irritated eyes restlessness seizures skin rash sore throat sores, ulcers, or white spots on the lips or in the mouth stomach cramps sudden decrease in the amount of urine swelling of the face, fingers, or lower legs swollen lymph glands swollen or painful glands thick, white vaginal discharge with no odor or with a mild odor tightness in the chest trouble sitting still troubled breathing unpleasant breath odor unusual bleeding or bruising unusual tiredness or weakness unusual weight loss upper right abdominal pain vomiting vomiting of blood weight gain wheezing yellowing of the eyes or skin

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

Incidence not known Bleeding, blistering, burning, coldness, discoloration of the skin, feeling of pressure, hives, infection, inflammation, itching, lumps, numbness, pain, rash, redness, scarring, soreness, stinging, swelling, tenderness, tingling, ulceration, or warmth at the injection site hives or welts redness of the skin sore mouth or tongue weight loss white patches in the mouth, tongue, or throat

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: cefazolin Injection side effects (in more detail)

The information contained in the Thomson Reuters Micromedex products as delivered by Drugs.com is intended as an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment. It is not a substitute for a medical exam, nor does it replace the need for services provided by medical professionals. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before taking any prescription or over the counter drugs (including any herbal medicines or supplements) or following any treatment or regimen. Only your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist can provide you with advice on what is safe and effective for you.

The use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products is at your sole risk. These products are provided "AS IS" and "as available" for use, without warranties of any kind, either express or implied. Thomson Reuters Healthcare and Drugs.com make no representation or warranty as to the accuracy, reliability, timeliness, usefulness or completeness of any of the information contained in the products. Additionally, THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE MAKES NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTIES AS TO THE OPINIONS OR OTHER SERVICE OR DATA YOU MAY ACCESS, DOWNLOAD OR USE AS A RESULT OF USE OF THE THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS. ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR USE ARE HEREBY EXCLUDED. Thomson Reuters Healthcare does not assume any responsibility or risk for your use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products.

More cefazolin Injection resources Cefazolin Injection Side Effects (in more detail) Cefazolin Injection Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Cefazolin Injection Drug Interactions Cefazolin Injection Support Group 0 Reviews for Cefazolin Injection - Add your own review/rating Compare cefazolin Injection with other medications Bacterial Endocarditis Prevention Bacterial Infection Bone infection Cholecystitis Endocarditis Joint Infection Kidney Infections Peritonitis Pneumonia Prevention of Perinatal Group B Streptococcal Disease Septicemia Skin Infection Surgical Prophylaxis Urinary Tract Infection



Pronunciation: KLOR-fen-IR-a-meen/SOO-do-e-FED-rin/EYE-bue-PROE-fen



Generic Name: chorionic gonadotropin (Subcutaneous route, Intramuscular route, Injection route)

kor-ee-ON-ok goe-nad-oh-TROE-pin

Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

Chorex Novarel Ovidrel Pregnyl Profasi

In Canada

Chorionic Gonadotropin

Available Dosage Forms:

Powder for Solution Solution

Therapeutic Class: Endocrine-Metabolic Agent

Pharmacologic Class: Gonadotropin

Uses For Chorex

Chorionic gonadotropin is a drug whose actions are almost the same as those of luteinizing hormone (LH), which is produced by the pituitary gland. It is a hormone also normally produced by the placenta in pregnancy. Chorionic gonadotropin has different uses for females and males.

In females, chorionic gonadotropin is used to help conception occur. It is usually given in combination with other drugs such as menotropins and urofollitropin. Many women being treated with these drugs usually have already tried clomiphene alone (e.g., Serophene) and have not been able to conceive yet. Chorionic gonadotropin is also used in in vitro fertilization (IVF) programs.

In males, LH and chorionic gonadotropin stimulate the testes to produce male hormones such as testosterone. Testosterone causes the enlargement of the penis and testes and the growth of pubic and underarm hair. It also increases the production of sperm.

Although chorionic gonadotropin has been prescribed to help some patients lose weight, it should never be used this way. When used improperly, chorionic gonadotropin can cause serious problems.

Chorionic gonadotropin is to be administered only by or under the immediate supervision of your doctor.

Before Using Chorex

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this medicine, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Chorionic gonadotropin, when used for treating cryptorchidism (a birth defect where the testes remain inside the body), has caused the sexual organs of some male children to develop too rapidly.

Pregnancy Pregnancy Category Explanation All Trimesters X Studies in animals or pregnant women have demonstrated positive evidence of fetal abnormalities. This drug should not be used in women who are or may become pregnant because the risk clearly outweighs any possible benefit. Breast Feeding

There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. Tell your healthcare professional if you are taking any other prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medicine.

Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of this medicine. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

Asthma or Epilepsy (seizures) or Heart problems or Kidney problems or Migraine headaches—This medication may worsen these conditions. Cancer of the prostate or Precocious puberty (a condition that causes early puberty in boys before 9 years of age)—Increases in the amount of testosterone in the bloodstream may make these conditions worse. Cyst on ovary or Fibroid tumors of the uterus—Chorionic gonadotropin can cause further growth of cysts on the ovary or fibroid tumors of the uterus Unusual vaginal bleeding—Irregular vaginal bleeding is a sign that the endometrium is growing too much, of endometrial cancer, or of other hormone imbalances; the increases in estrogen production caused by ovulation can aggravate these problems of the endometrium. If other hormone imbalances are present, they should be treated before beginning ovulation induction Proper Use of chorionic gonadotropin

This section provides information on the proper use of a number of products that contain chorionic gonadotropin. It may not be specific to Chorex. Please read with care.

Dosing

The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

For injection dosage form: For treating men with problems related to low levels of male hormones: Adults—1000 to 4000 Units injected into the muscle two to three times a week. You may need to receive this medicine for several weeks, months, or longer. If you are being treated for a low sperm count and have been on this medicine for six months, your doctor may give you another hormone medicine (menotropin or urofollitropin injection). You may need to receive both of these medicines together for up to twelve more months. To help pregnancy occur in women: Adults—5000 to 10,000 Units injected into the muscle on a day chosen by your doctor. The dose and day will depend on your hormone levels and the other medicines that you have been using. For the treatment of cryptorchidism (condition where testes do not develop properly): Children—1000 to 5000 Units injected into the muscle two to three times a week for up to ten doses. Precautions While Using Chorex

It is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits to make sure that the medicine is working and to check for unwanted effects.

For women taking this medicine to become pregnant :

Record your basal body temperature every day if told to do so by your doctor, so that you will know if you have begun to ovulate. It is important that intercourse take place around the time of ovulation to give you the best chance of becoming pregnant. Your doctor will likely want to monitor the development of the ovarian follicle(s) by measuring the amount of estrogen in your bloodstream and by checking the size of the follicle(s) with ultrasound examinations. Chorex Side Effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor as soon as possible if any of the following side effects occur:

For females onlyMore common Bloating (mild) stomach or pelvic pain Less common or rare Abdominal or stomach pain (severe) bloating (moderate to severe) decreased amount of urine feeling of indigestion nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea (continuing or severe) pelvic pain (severe) shortness of breath swelling of feet or lower legs weight gain (rapid) For boys onlyLess common Acne enlargement of penis and testes growth of pubic hair increase in height (rapid) Frequency not determined difficult or labored breathing difficulty breathing flushing of skin hives or welts itching of skin large, hive-like swelling on face, eyelids, lips, tongue, throat, hands, legs, feet, sex organs pain in chest, groin, or legs, especially the calves redness of skin severe, sudden headache skin rash slurred speech sudden loss of coordination sudden, severe weakness or numbness in arm or leg sudden, unexplained shortness of breath tightness in chest unusually warm skin vision changes wheezing

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

Less common Discouragement enlargement of breasts feeling sad or empty headache irritability lack of appetite loss of interest or pleasure pain at place of injection trouble concentrating trouble sleeping tiredness

After you stop using this medicine, it may still produce some side effects that need attention. During this period of time, check with your doctor immediately if you notice the following side effects:

For females onlyLess common or rare Abdominal or stomach pain (severe) bloating (moderate to severe) decreased amount of urine feeling of indigestion nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea (continuing or severe) pelvic pain (severe) shortness of breath weight gain (rapid)

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Chorex side effects (in more detail)

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More Chorex resources Chorex Side Effects (in more detail) Chorex Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Chorex Drug Interactions Chorex Support Group 0 Reviews for Chorex - Add your own review/rating Hcg Consumer Overview Novarel MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Novarel Prescribing Information (FDA) Ovidrel Prescribing Information (FDA) Ovidrel Monograph (AHFS DI) Ovidrel MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Pregnyl Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare Chorex with other medications Female Infertility Hypogonadism, Male Ovulation Induction Prepubertal Cryptorchidism





Generic Name: zinc oxide topical (ZINK OX ide)



Pronunciation: CHAR-kole



Generic Name: acamprosate (a KAM proe sate)





Generic Name: Artemether and Lumefantrine



Pronunciation: KROE-moe-lin



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