meprobamate


Generic Name: meprobamate (meh pro BA mate)
Brand names: Equanil, Miltown, MB-TAB

What is meprobamate?

Meprobamate affects chemicals in your brain that may become unbalanced and cause anxiety.

Meprobamate is used to relieve anxiety, nervousness, and tension associated with anxiety disorders.

Meprobamate may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about meprobamate? Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Meprobamate may cause drowsiness, dizziness, and blurred vision. If you experience drowsiness, dizziness, or blurred vision, avoid these activities. Use alcohol cautiously. Alcohol may increase drowsiness and dizziness while you are taking meprobamate. Do not stop taking meprobamate suddenly if you have been taking it for several weeks. Stopping suddenly may cause withdrawal symptoms and make you uncomfortable. Talk to your doctor if you need to stop treatment with meprobamate. Notify your doctor if you develop a fever, a skin rash, or a sore throat. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking meprobamate?

Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you have

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porphyria,

kidney disease, liver disease,

epilepsy or another seizure disorder, or

a history of drug or alcohol abuse.

You may not be able to take meprobamate, or you may require a lower dose or special monitoring during treatment if you have any of the conditions listed above.

Meprobamate may harm an unborn baby. Do not take this medication without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant. Meprobamate passes into breast milk. Do not take meprobamate without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. If you are over 60 years of age, you may be more likely to experience side effects from meprobamate. You may require a lower dose of this medication or special monitoring during treatment. Meprobamate is not approved for use by children younger than 6 years of age. How should I take meprobamate?

Take meprobamate exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these instructions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you.

Take each dose with a full glass of water. Do not crush, chew, or open any of the tablets or capsules. Swallow them whole.

Do not take more of this medication than is prescribed for you.

Do not stop taking meprobamate suddenly if you have been taking it for several weeks. Stopping suddenly may cause withdrawal symptoms and make you uncomfortable. Talk to your doctor if you need to stop treatment with meprobamate. Store meprobamate at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the dose you missed and take only your next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose of this medication. A double dose could be very dangerous.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention.

Symptoms of a meprobamate overdose include sleepiness, dizziness, confusion, a slow heartbeat, difficulty breathing, difficulty walking and talking, an appearance of being drunk, and unconsciousness.

What should I avoid while taking meprobamate? Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Meprobamate may cause drowsiness, dizziness, and blurred vision. If you experience drowsiness, dizziness, or blurred vision, avoid these activities. Use alcohol cautiously. Alcohol may increase drowsiness and dizziness while you are taking meprobamate.

Avoid other sedatives, sleeping pills, and tranquilizers. They should not be used while you are taking meprobamate unless your doctor approves.

Meprobamate side effects If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking meprobamate and seek emergency medical attention:

an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, face, or tongue; or hives);

fast or irregular heartbeats;

abnormal behavior;

fever;

a skin rash; or

a sore throat.

Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take meprobamate and talk to your doctor if you experience

drowsiness or dizziness,

headache,

weakness,

vomiting or diarrhea, or

numbness or tingling.

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect meprobamate?

Meprobamate may increase the effects of other drugs that cause drowsiness, including antidepressants, alcohol, antihistamines, sedatives (used to treat insomnia), pain relievers, other anxiety medicines, and muscle relaxants. Tell your doctor about all medicines that you are taking, and do not take any medicine unless your doctor approves.

Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with meprobamate. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines.

More meprobamate resources Meprobamate Side Effects (in more detail) Meprobamate Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Meprobamate Drug Interactions Meprobamate Support Group 2 Reviews for Meprobamate - Add your own review/rating meprobamate Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Meprobamate Prescribing Information (FDA) Meprobamate Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Meprobamate Monograph (AHFS DI) Meprobamate MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Compare meprobamate with other medications Anxiety Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has additional information about meprobamate written for health professionals that you may read.

See also: meprobamate side effects (in more detail)


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Equanil


Generic Name: meprobamate (meh pro BA mate)
Brand Names: Equanil, Miltown

What is Equanil (meprobamate)?

Meprobamate affects chemicals in your brain that may become unbalanced and cause anxiety.

Meprobamate is used to relieve anxiety, nervousness, and tension associated with anxiety disorders.

Meprobamate may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Equanil (meprobamate)? Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Meprobamate may cause drowsiness, dizziness, and blurred vision. If you experience drowsiness, dizziness, or blurred vision, avoid these activities. Use alcohol cautiously. Alcohol may increase drowsiness and dizziness while you are taking meprobamate. Do not stop taking meprobamate suddenly if you have been taking it for several weeks. Stopping suddenly may cause withdrawal symptoms and make you uncomfortable. Talk to your doctor if you need to stop treatment with meprobamate. Notify your doctor if you develop a fever, a skin rash, or a sore throat. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Equanil (meprobamate)?

Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you have

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porphyria,

kidney disease, liver disease,

epilepsy or another seizure disorder, or

a history of drug or alcohol abuse.

You may not be able to take meprobamate, or you may require a lower dose or special monitoring during treatment if you have any of the conditions listed above.

Meprobamate may harm an unborn baby. Do not take this medication without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant. Meprobamate passes into breast milk. Do not take meprobamate without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. If you are over 60 years of age, you may be more likely to experience side effects from meprobamate. You may require a lower dose of this medication or special monitoring during treatment. Meprobamate is not approved for use by children younger than 6 years of age. How should I take Equanil (meprobamate)?

Take meprobamate exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these instructions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you.

Take each dose with a full glass of water. Do not crush, chew, or open any of the tablets or capsules. Swallow them whole.

Do not take more of this medication than is prescribed for you.

Do not stop taking meprobamate suddenly if you have been taking it for several weeks. Stopping suddenly may cause withdrawal symptoms and make you uncomfortable. Talk to your doctor if you need to stop treatment with meprobamate. Store meprobamate at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the dose you missed and take only your next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose of this medication. A double dose could be very dangerous.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention.

Symptoms of a meprobamate overdose include sleepiness, dizziness, confusion, a slow heartbeat, difficulty breathing, difficulty walking and talking, an appearance of being drunk, and unconsciousness.

What should I avoid while taking Equanil (meprobamate)? Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Meprobamate may cause drowsiness, dizziness, and blurred vision. If you experience drowsiness, dizziness, or blurred vision, avoid these activities. Use alcohol cautiously. Alcohol may increase drowsiness and dizziness while you are taking meprobamate.

Avoid other sedatives, sleeping pills, and tranquilizers. They should not be used while you are taking meprobamate unless your doctor approves.

Equanil (meprobamate) side effects If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking meprobamate and seek emergency medical attention:

an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, face, or tongue; or hives);

fast or irregular heartbeats;

abnormal behavior;

fever;

a skin rash; or

a sore throat.

Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take meprobamate and talk to your doctor if you experience

drowsiness or dizziness,

headache,

weakness,

vomiting or diarrhea, or

numbness or tingling.

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Equanil (meprobamate)?

Meprobamate may increase the effects of other drugs that cause drowsiness, including antidepressants, alcohol, antihistamines, sedatives (used to treat insomnia), pain relievers, other anxiety medicines, and muscle relaxants. Tell your doctor about all medicines that you are taking, and do not take any medicine unless your doctor approves.

Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with meprobamate. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines.

More Equanil resources Equanil Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Equanil Drug Interactions Equanil Support Group 0 Reviews for Equanil - Add your own review/rating Meprobamate Prescribing Information (FDA) Meprobamate Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Meprobamate Monograph (AHFS DI) Meprobamate MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Mb-Tab Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Compare Equanil with other medications Anxiety Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has additional information about meprobamate written for health professionals that you may read.
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Hydroxyzine Suspension


Pronunciation: hye-DROX-i-zeen
Generic Name: Hydroxyzine
Brand Name: Vistaril
Hydroxyzine Suspension is used for:

Treating anxiety, causing sedation before and after general anesthesia, and treating itching due to certain allergic conditions, including hives and contact dermatitis (eg, poison ivy). It also may be used for other conditions as determined by your doctor.

Hydroxyzine Suspension is an antihistamine. It works by affecting the brain to reduce anxiety. It also has other activities, including opening breathing tubes, relieving pain or allergy symptoms, and preventing or treating nausea and vomiting caused by motion sickness.

Do NOT use Hydroxyzine Suspension if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Hydroxyzine Suspension you are taking sodium oxybate (GHB) you are in your first 3 months of pregnancy

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

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Before using Hydroxyzine Suspension:

Some medical conditions may interact with Hydroxyzine Suspension. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you have asthma, glaucoma, difficulty urinating, a urinary or intestinal blockage, a prostate disease, or a blood disease if you drink alcoholic beverages

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Hydroxyzine Suspension. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Sodium oxybate (GHB) because side effects, such as an increase in sleep duration and slowed breathing, may occur

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Hydroxyzine Suspension may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Hydroxyzine Suspension:

Use Hydroxyzine Suspension as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Take Hydroxyzine Suspension by mouth with or without food. If stomach upset occurs, take with food to reduce stomach irritation. Shake well before each use. Use a measuring device marked for medicine dosing. Ask your pharmacist for help if you are unsure of how to measure your dose. If you miss a dose of Hydroxyzine Suspension and you are using it regularly, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for you next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Hydroxyzine Suspension.

Important safety information: Hydroxyzine Suspension may cause drowsiness. These effects may be worse if you take it with alcohol or certain medicines. Use Hydroxyzine Suspension with caution. Do not drive or perform other possibly unsafe tasks until you know how you react to it. Avoid drinking alcohol or using medicines that may cause drowsiness (eg, sleep aids, muscle relaxers) while you are using Hydroxyzine Suspension; it may add to their effects. Ask your pharmacist if you have questions about which medicines may cause drowsiness. The effectiveness of Hydroxyzine Suspension as anxiety treatment for longer than 4 months is not known. Use Hydroxyzine Suspension with caution in the ELDERLY; they may be more sensitive to its effects. Hydroxyzine Suspension should not be used in NEWBORNS; safety and effectiveness in newborns have not been confirmed. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: Do not use Hydroxyzine Suspension if you are in your first 3 months of pregnancy. If you think you may be pregnant, contact your doctor right away. It is not known if Hydroxyzine Suspension is found in breast milk. Do not breast-feed while taking Hydroxyzine Suspension. Possible side effects of Hydroxyzine Suspension:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Drowsiness; dry mouth.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); involuntary movements.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

See also: Hydroxyzine side effects (in more detail)

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center, or emergency room immediately. Symptoms may include unusual drowsiness or dizziness.

Proper storage of Hydroxyzine Suspension:

Store Hydroxyzine Suspension at room temperature, between 59 and 86 degrees F (15 and 30 degrees C), in a tightly closed container. Do not freeze. Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Hydroxyzine Suspension out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Hydroxyzine Suspension, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Hydroxyzine Suspension is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about Hydroxyzine Suspension. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Hydroxyzine resources Hydroxyzine Side Effects (in more detail) Hydroxyzine Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Hydroxyzine Drug Interactions Hydroxyzine Support Group 99 Reviews for Hydroxyzine - Add your own review/rating Compare Hydroxyzine with other medications Allergic Urticaria Allergies Anxiety Interstitial Cystitis Nausea/Vomiting Pain Pruritus Sedation
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levorphanol


Generic Name: levorphanol (lee VOR fa nole)
Brand Names: Levo-Dromoran

What is levorphanol?

Levorphanol is in a group of drugs called narcotic pain relievers. It is similar to morphine.

Levorphanol is used to treat moderate to severe pain.

Levorphanol may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about levorphanol? Levorphanol may be habit-forming and should be used only by the person it was prescribed for. Levorphanol should never be given to another person, especially someone who has a history of drug abuse or addiction. Keep the medication in a secure place where others cannot get to it. Do not drink alcohol while you are taking levorphanol. Dangerous side effects or death can occur when alcohol is combined with a narcotic pain medicine. Check your food and medicine labels to be sure these products do not contain alcohol.

Never take more levorphanol than is prescribed. Tell your doctor if the medicine seems to stop working as well in relieving your pain.

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Levorphanol can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert. Do not stop using levorphanol suddenly, or you could have unpleasant withdrawal symptoms. Talk to your doctor about how to avoid withdrawal symptoms when stopping the medication. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking levorphanol? Do not use this medication if you have ever had an allergic reaction to a narcotic medicine (examples include codeine, methadone, morphine, Oxycontin, Darvocet, Percocet, Vicodin, Lortab, and many others). You should also not take levorphanol if you are having an asthma attack or if you have a bowel obstruction called paralytic ileus. Levorphanol may be habit-forming and should be used only by the person it was prescribed for. Levorphanol should never be given to another person, especially someone who has a history of drug abuse or addiction. Keep the medication in a secure place where others cannot get to it.

Before using levorphanol, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have:

asthma, COPD, sleep apnea, or other breathing disorders;

liver or kidney disease;

underactive thyroid;

curvature of the spine;

a history of head injury or brain tumor;

epilepsy or other seizure disorder;

low blood pressure;

gallbladder disease;

Addison's disease or other adrenal gland disorders;

enlarged prostate, urination problems;

mental illness; or

a history of drug or alcohol addiction.

FDA pregnancy category C. This medication may be harmful to an unborn baby, and could cause addiction or withdrawal symptoms in a newborn. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. Levorphanol can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Older adults may be more sensitive to the effects of this medicine.

How should I take levorphanol?

Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Never take levorphanol in larger amounts, or use it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label. Tell your doctor if the medicine seems to stop working as well in relieving your pain.

Take this medicine with a full glass of water. Take levorphanol with food or milk if it upsets your stomach. Do not stop using levorphanol suddenly, or you could have unpleasant withdrawal symptoms. Talk to your doctor about how to avoid withdrawal symptoms when stopping the medication. Store levorphanol at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

Keep track of how many tablets have been used from each new bottle of this medicine. Levorphanol is a drug of abuse and you should be aware if any person in the household is using this medicine improperly or without a prescription.

See also: Levorphanol dosage (in more detail)

What happens if I miss a dose?

Since levorphanol is sometimes used as needed, you may not be on a dosing schedule. If you are using the medication regularly, take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and wait until your next regularly scheduled dose. Do not use extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of levorphanol can be fatal.

Overdose symptoms may include extreme drowsiness, pinpoint pupils, confusion, cold and clammy skin, weak pulse, shallow breathing, fainting, or breathing that stops.

What should I avoid while taking levorphanol? Do not drink alcohol while you are using levorphanol. Dangerous side effects or death can occur when alcohol is combined with levorphanol. Check your food and medicine labels to be sure these products do not contain alcohol. Levorphanol can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert. Levorphanol side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

shallow breathing, slow heartbeat;

seizure (convulsions);

cold, clammy skin;

confusion;

severe weakness or dizziness; or

feeling light-headed, fainting.

Less serious side effects are more likely to occur, such as:

nausea, vomiting, constipation, loss of appetite;

dizziness, headache, tired feeling;

dry mouth;

sweating;

itching;

urinating less than usual; or

loss of interest in sex.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Levorphanol Dosing Information

Usual Adult Dose for Light Sedation:

Premedication for Anesthesia:
1 to 2 mg IM or subcutaneously, administered 60 to 90 minutes before surgery. Older or debilitated patients usually require less drug. Two mg of levorphanol is approximately equivalent to 10 to 15 mg of morphine or 100 mg of meperidine.

Usual Adult Dose for Pain:

IV: 1 mg every 3 to 6 hours as needed.
IM or subcutaneous: 1 to 2 mg every 6 to 8 hours as needed.
Oral: 2 mg every 6 to 8 hours as needed.
May be increased to 3 mg every 6 to 8 hours.

What other drugs will affect levorphanol? Do not take levorphanol with other narcotic pain medications, sedatives, tranquilizers, muscle relaxers, or other medicines that can make you sleepy or slow your breathing. Dangerous side effects may result.

Before taking levorphanol, tell your doctor if you are using pentazocine (Talwin), nalbuphine (Nubain), butorphanol (Stadol), or buprenorphine (Buprenex, Subutex). If you are using any of these drugs, you may not be able to use levorphanol, or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment.

There may be other drugs that can interact with levorphanol. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

More levorphanol resources Levorphanol Side Effects (in more detail) Levorphanol Dosage Levorphanol Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Levorphanol Drug Interactions Levorphanol Support Group 5 Reviews for Levorphanol - Add your own review/rating levorphanol Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Levorphanol MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Levorphanol Prescribing Information (FDA) Levo-Dromoran Monograph (AHFS DI) Levo-Dromoran Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare levorphanol with other medications Light Sedation Pain Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about levorphanol.

See also: levorphanol side effects (in more detail)


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Lorazepam


Pronunciation: lor-AZ-e-pam
Generic Name: Lorazepam
Brand Name: Ativan Tablet
Lorazepam is used for:

Treating anxiety or anxiety associated with symptoms of depression. It may also be used for other conditions as determined by your doctor.

Lorazepam is a benzodiazepine. It works by slowing down the movement of chemicals in the brain. This results in a reduction in nervous tension (anxiety) and causes little sedation.

Do NOT use Lorazepam if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Lorazepam you are allergic to other benzodiazepines (eg, alprazolam) you have narrow-angle glaucoma, psychosis, or severe liver disease you are taking sodium oxybate (GHB)

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Video: Treatment for Depression

Treatments for depression are getting better everyday and there are things you can start doing right away.

Before using Lorazepam:

Some medical conditions may interact with Lorazepam. Tell your health care provider if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you are taking any other medicine that causes drowsiness (eg, narcotics, some antidepressants) if you have a history of lung problems (eg, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD]), muscle weakness or fatigue, glaucoma, liver problems, blood disorders, depression, mood or mental problems, or suicidal thoughts if you have a history of drug abuse or dependence

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Lorazepam. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Hydantoins (eg, phenytoin) or theophyllines because they may decrease Lorazepam's effectiveness Clozapine, kava, loxapine, narcotic pain relievers (eg, morphine, codeine), sodium oxybate (GHB), or valproic acid because side effects, such as extreme sedation, slowed breathing, confusion, or memory problems, may occur Digoxin, hydantoins (eg, phenytoin), narcotic pain relievers (eg, morphine, codeine), nondepolarizing muscle relaxants (eg, vecuronium), or sodium oxybate (GHB) because the risk of their side effects may be increased by Lorazepam Nondepolarizing muscle relaxants (eg, vecuronium) because they may decrease Lorazepam's effectiveness

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Lorazepam may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Lorazepam:

Use Lorazepam as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Take Lorazepam by mouth with or without food. If you use Lorazepam regularly and you miss a dose, take it as soon as possible. If several hours have passed or if it is nearing time for the next dose, do not double the dose to catch up, unless advised to by your doctor. If more than one dose is missed, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Lorazepam.

Important safety information: Lorazepam may cause drowsiness or dizziness. These effects may be worse if you take it with alcohol or certain medicines. Use Lorazepam with caution. Do not drive or perform other possibly unsafe tasks until you know how you react to it. Do not drink alcohol or use medicines that may cause drowsiness (eg, sleep aids, muscle relaxers) while you are using Lorazepam without first checking with your doctor; it may add to their effects. Ask your pharmacist if you have questions about which medicines may cause drowsiness. Lorazepam may be habit forming if you take Lorazepam in high doses or for a long time. Do NOT take more than the recommended dose or use for longer than prescribed without checking with your doctor. Lab tests, including liver function and complete blood counts, may be performed while you use Lorazepam. These tests may be used to monitor your condition or check for side effects. Be sure to keep all doctor and lab appointments. Use Lorazepam with caution in the ELDERLY; they may be more sensitive to its effects. Lorazepam should be used with extreme caution in CHILDREN younger than 12 years old; safety and effectiveness in these children have not been confirmed. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: Lorazepam has been shown to cause harm to the fetus. Do not become pregnant while you are using it. If you think you may be pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Lorazepam while you are pregnant. Lorazepam is found in breast milk. Do not breast-feed while taking Lorazepam.

Some people who use Lorazepam for a long time may develop a need to continue taking it. People who take high doses are also at risk. This is known as DEPENDENCE or addiction.

If you stop taking Lorazepam suddenly, you may have WITHDRAWAL symptoms. These may include agitation, anxiety, irritability, occasional seizures, or sleeplessness may occur if Lorazepam is suddenly stopped. If you need to stop Lorazepam, your doctor will lower your dose over time.

Possible side effects of Lorazepam:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Clumsiness; dizziness; drowsiness; headache; lightheadedness; unsteadiness; weakness.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); memory loss; mood or mental changes (eg, depression).

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

See also: Lorazepam side effects (in more detail)

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center, or emergency room immediately. Symptoms of overdose may include clumsiness; confusion; deep sleep; loss of consciousness; slow reflexes.

Proper storage of Lorazepam:

Store Lorazepam at room temperature, between 59 and 86 degrees F (15 and 30 degrees C). Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Lorazepam out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Lorazepam, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Lorazepam is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about Lorazepam. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Lorazepam resources Lorazepam Side Effects (in more detail) Lorazepam Dosage Lorazepam Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Lorazepam Drug Interactions Lorazepam Support Group 193 Reviews for Lorazepam - Add your own review/rating Lorazepam Prescribing Information (FDA) Lorazepam Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Lorazepam Monograph (AHFS DI) Ativan Consumer Overview Ativan Prescribing Information (FDA) lorazepam Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Compare Lorazepam with other medications Anxiety Cervical Dystonia Dysautonomia ICU Agitation Insomnia Light Anesthesia Nausea/Vomiting Nausea/Vomiting, Chemotherapy Induced Panic Disorder Sedation Status Epilepticus
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nadolol


Generic Name: nadolol (na DOE lol)
Brand Names: Corgard

What is nadolol?

Nadolol is in a group of drugs called beta-blockers. Beta-blockers affect the heart and circulation (blood flow through arteries and veins).

Nadolol is used to treat angina (chest pain) or hypertension (high blood pressure).

Nadolol may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about nadolol? Do not stop taking nadolol without first talking to your doctor. Stopping suddenly may make your condition worse. If you need surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using nadolol. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time. Nadolol may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert.

Keep using this medicine as directed, even if you feel well. High blood pressure often has no symptoms. You may need to use blood pressure medication for the rest of your life.

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Treatments for depression are getting better everyday and there are things you can start doing right away.

Nadolol is only part of a complete program of treatment for hypertension that may also include diet, exercise, and weight control. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely if you are being treated for hypertension.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking nadolol? You should not take nadolol if you are allergic to it, or if you have:

asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD;

certain serious heart conditions such as"AV block" or slow heart rhythm; or

conditions that cause very low blood pressure.

If you have any of these other conditions, you may need a nadolol dose adjustment or special tests:

bronchitis, emphysema, sleep apnea, or other breathing problem;

congestive heart failure;

liver or kidney disease;

diabetes;

a thyroid disorder; or

pheochromocytoma (tumor of the adrenal gland).

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether nadolol will harm an unborn baby. Nadolol may cause heart or lung problems in a newborn if the mother takes the medication during pregnancy. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication. Nadolol can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while taking nadolol. How should I take nadolol?

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results.

Your blood pressure will need to be checked often, and you may need other blood tests at your doctor's office. Visit your doctor regularly.

Do not skip doses or stop taking nadolol without first talking to your doctor. Stopping suddenly may make your condition worse. If you need surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using nadolol. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time.

Taking nadolol can make it harder for you to tell when your blood sugar is low. If you have diabetes, check your blood sugar regularly.

This medication can cause false results with certain lab tests of the urine. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using nadolol.

Keep using this medicine as directed, even if you feel well. High blood pressure often has no symptoms. You may need to use blood pressure medication for the rest of your life.

Nadolol is only part of a complete program of treatment for hypertension that may also include diet, exercise, and weight control. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely if you are being treated for hypertension.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light.

See also: Nadolol dosage (in more detail)

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if your next dose is less than 8 hours away. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include slow heart rate, extreme dizziness, or fainting.

What should I avoid while taking nadolol? Nadolol may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert. Drinking alcohol can further lower your blood pressure and may increase certain side effects of nadolol. Nadolol side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

slow or uneven heartbeats;

numbness or cold feeling;

feeling like you might pass out;

feeling short of breath, even with mild exertion;

swelling or rapid weight gain;

bronchospasm (wheezing, chest tightness, trouble breathing);

hallucinations, behavior changes; or

nausea, upper stomach pain, itching, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes).

Less serious side effects may include:

dizziness, spinning sensation;

tired feeling;

mild nausea, diarrhea, constipation, upset stomach, bloating, gas; or

tingly feeling.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Nadolol Dosing Information

Usual Adult Dose for Angina Pectoris:

Initial dose: 40 mg orally once a day.
Maintenance dose: 40-80 mg orally once a day.
Doses up to 160-240 mg may be needed.

Usual Adult Dose for Hypertension:

Initial dose: 40 mg orally once a day.
Maintenance dose: 40-80 mg orally once a day.
Doses up to 240-320 mg may be needed.

Usual Adult Dose for Parkinsonian Tremor:

Initial dose: 40-60 mg orally once a day.
Maintenance dose: 40-80 mg orally once a day.

Usual Adult Dose for Anxiety:

Initial dose: 40 mg orally once a day.
Maintenance dose: 40-80 mg orally once a day.
Doses up to 320 mg may be needed.

Usual Adult Dose for Benign Essential Tremor:

Initial dose: 40 mg orally once a day.
Maintenance dose: 40-80 mg orally once a day.
Doses up to 320 mg may be needed.

Usual Adult Dose for Esophageal Variceal Hemorrhage Prophylaxis:

Initial dose: 40 mg orally once a day.
Maintenance dose: 40-80 mg orally once a day.
Doses up to 320 mg may be needed.

Usual Adult Dose for Glaucoma:

Initial dose: 40 mg orally once a day.
Maintenance dose: 40-80 mg orally once a day.
Doses up to 320 mg may be needed.

Usual Adult Dose for Lithium Tremor:

Initial dose: 40 mg orally once a day.
Maintenance dose: 40-80 mg orally once a day.
Doses up to 320 mg may be needed.

Usual Adult Dose for Migraine Prophylaxis:

Initial dose: 40 mg orally once a day.
Maintenance dose: 40-80 mg orally once a day.
Doses up to 320 mg may be needed.

Usual Adult Dose for Supraventricular Tachycardia:

Initial dose: 40 mg orally once a day.
Maintenance dose: 40-80 mg orally once a day.
Doses up to 320 mg may be needed.

What other drugs will affect nadolol?

Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use, especially:

digoxin (digitalis, Lanoxin);

a diuretic (water pill);

insulin or oral diabetes medication; or

reserpine.

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with nadolol. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More nadolol resources Nadolol Side Effects (in more detail) Nadolol Dosage Nadolol Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Nadolol Drug Interactions Nadolol Support Group 11 Reviews for Nadolol - Add your own review/rating nadolol Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Nadolol Prescribing Information (FDA) Nadolol Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Nadolol Monograph (AHFS DI) Nadolol MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Corgard Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare nadolol with other medications Angina Anxiety Benign Essential Tremor Esophageal Variceal Hemorrhage Prophylaxis Glaucoma High Blood Pressure Lithium Tremor Migraine Prevention Mitral Valve Prolapse Parkinsonian Tremor Supraventricular Tachycardia Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about nadolol.

See also: nadolol side effects (in more detail)


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Midazolam


Pronunciation: meh-DAZE-oh-lam
Generic Name: Midazolam
Brand Name: Generic only. No brands available.

Midazolam may cause severe breathing problems (eg, respiratory depression, respiratory arrest), especially when used for sedation in noncritical care settings. Respiratory depression and respiratory arrest could result in brain damage or death if not treated properly. Midazolam should only be used under appropriate close medical supervision.

Do not give Midazolam by rapid intravenous (IV) injection to newborn infants (neonates). Severe low blood pressure and seizures have occurred in neonates when given Midazolam by rapid IV injection, especially when given at the same time as fentanyl.


Midazolam is used for:

Reducing anxiety or producing drowsiness or anesthesia before certain medical procedures or surgery. It may also be given continuously to maintain sedation or anesthesia in certain patients. It may also be used for other conditions as determined by your doctor.

Midazolam is a benzodiazepine. It works in the central nervous system (brain) to cause sleepiness, muscle relaxation, and short-term memory loss, and to reduce anxiety.

Do NOT use Midazolam if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Midazolam you have acute narrow-angle glaucoma, severe mental problems (eg, psychosis), or severe liver disease you have alcohol intoxication with abnormal vital signs you are taking delavirdine, efavirenz, an HIV protease inhibitor (eg, ritonavir), or sodium oxybate (GHB)

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Video: Treatment for Depression

Treatments for depression are getting better everyday and there are things you can start doing right away.

Before using Midazolam:

Some medical conditions may interact with Midazolam. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you have breathing problems (eg, COPD); open-angle glaucoma; heart, liver, or kidney problems; the blood disease porphyria; severe depression; or a history of drug abuse or dependence; or if you have used alcohol recently

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Midazolam. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Carbamazepine, rifampin, or St. John's wort because the effectiveness of Midazolam may be decreased Azole antifungals (eg, itraconazole), barbiturates (eg, phenobarbital), clozapine, delavirdine, diltiazem, disulfiram, efavirenz, grapefruit juice, HIV protease inhibitors (eg, ritonavir), ketolides (eg, telithromycin), macrolides (eg, erythromycin), narcotic pain medicines (eg, codeine), nefazodone, omeprazole, sodium oxybate (GHB), valproic acid, or verapamil and its derivatives because serious side effects, such as low blood pressure, breathing problems, and excessive sedation, may occur Hydantoins because side effects may be increased by Midazolam

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Midazolam may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Midazolam:

Use Midazolam as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Midazolam is usually administered as an injection at your doctor's office, clinic, or hospital. Ask your doctor or pharmacist any questions that you may have about Midazolam. If Midazolam contains particles or is discolored, or if the vial is cracked or damaged in any way, do not use it. Keep this product, as well as syringes and needles, out of the reach of children and away from pets. Do not reuse needles, syringes, or other materials. Dispose of properly after use. Ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain local regulations for proper disposal. If you miss a dose of Midazolam, contact your doctor immediately.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Midazolam.

Important safety information: Midazolam may cause drowsiness or dizziness. Do not drive, operate machinery, or do anything else that could be dangerous until the effects of Midazolam have disappeared or until the day after you receive Midazolam, whichever is longer. Using Midazolam alone, with certain other medicines, or with alcohol may lessen your ability to drive or perform other potentially dangerous tasks. Avoid drinking alcohol or taking other medications that cause drowsiness (eg, sedatives, tranquilizers) while using Midazolam. Midazolam will add to the effects of alcohol and other depressants. Ask your pharmacist if you have questions about which medicines are depressants. Midazolam can cause partial or complete memory loss for several hours. Use Midazolam with caution in the ELDERLY because they may be more sensitive to its effects. Caution is advised when using Midazolam in CHILDREN because they may be more sensitive to its effects. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: Midazolam has been shown to cause harm to the fetus. If you plan on becoming pregnant, discuss with your doctor the benefits and risks of using Midazolam during pregnancy. Midazolam is excreted in breast milk. If you are or will be breast-feeding while you are using Midazolam, check with your doctor or pharmacist to discuss the risks to your baby.

When used for long periods of time or at high doses, some people develop a need to continue taking Midazolam. This is known as DEPENDENCE or addiction.

If you use Midazolam for long periods of time or at high doses and suddenly stop taking Midazolam, you may experience WITHDRAWAL symptoms including fast heartbeat, hallucinations, muscle cramps, seizures, stomach cramps, sweating, tremor, and vomiting.

Possible side effects of Midazolam:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Blurred vision; changes in blood pressure, breathing, and heartbeats; coughing; dizziness; drowsiness; dry mouth; headache; hiccups; low blood pressure (children); nausea; pain during injection; pain, redness, or tenderness at the injection site; short-term memory loss; slurred speech; vomiting.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); agitation; chest pain; combativeness; irregular breathing patterns; pain, swelling, or redness at the injection site; slow or difficult breathing; unusual or involuntary muscle movements or muscle tremor.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

See also: Midazolam side effects (in more detail)

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center, or emergency room immediately. Symptoms may include clumsiness; confusion; deep sleep; loss of consciousness; sleepiness; slow reflexes.

Proper storage of Midazolam:

Midazolam is usually handled and stored by a health care provider. If you are using Midazolam at home, store Midazolam as directed by your pharmacist or health care provider. Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Keep Midazolam out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Midazolam, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Midazolam is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about Midazolam. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Midazolam resources Midazolam Side Effects (in more detail) Midazolam Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Midazolam Drug Interactions Midazolam Support Group 6 Reviews for Midazolam - Add your own review/rating midazolam Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Midazolam Hydrochloride Monograph (AHFS DI) Compare Midazolam with other medications ICU Agitation Light Anesthesia Light Sedation
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Seconal Sodium


Generic Name: secobarbital (SEE koe BAR bi tal)
Brand Names: Seconal Sodium

What is Seconal Sodium (secobarbital)?

Secobarbital is in a group of drugs called barbiturates (bar-BIT-chur-ates). Secobarbital slows the activity of your brain and nervous system.

Secobarbital is used short-term to treat insomnia, or as a sedative before surgery.

Secobarbital may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Seconal Sodium (secobarbital)? Secobarbital may cause a severe allergic reaction. Stop taking secobarbital and get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Take secobarbital only when you are getting ready for several hours of sleep. You may fall asleep very quickly after taking the medicine.

Some people using this medicine have engaged in activity such as driving, and later having no memory of the activity. If this happens to you, stop taking secobarbital and talk with your doctor about another treatment for your sleep disorder.

Video: Treatment for Depression

Treatments for depression are getting better everyday and there are things you can start doing right away.

Do not use secobarbital without telling your doctor if you are pregnant. It could cause harm to the unborn baby. Use an effective form of birth control, and tell your doctor if you become pregnant during treatment. Secobarbital can make birth control pills less effective. Ask your doctor about using a non-hormone method of birth control (such as a condom, diaphragm, spermicide) to prevent pregnancy while taking secobarbital. Secobarbital may be habit-forming and should be used only by the person it was prescribed for. Secobarbital should never be shared with another person, especially someone who has a history of drug abuse or addiction. Keep the medication in a secure place where others cannot get to it. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Seconal Sodium (secobarbital)?

Some people using this medicine have engaged in activity such as driving, and later having no memory of the activity. If this happens to you, stop taking secobarbital and talk with your doctor about another treatment for your sleep disorder.

Do not take this medication if you are allergic to secobarbital, or if you have porphyria.

If you have any of these other conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely take secobarbital:

severe asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD), or other breathing disorder;

a blood cell disorder such as anemia (lack of red blood cells);

epilepsy or other seizure disorder;

liver disease;

heart disease;

overactive thyroid;

a history of depression, mental illness, or suicide attempt; or

a history of drug or alcohol addiction.

Secobarbital may be habit-forming and should be used only by the person it was prescribed for. Secobarbital should never be shared with another person, especially someone who has a history of drug abuse or addiction. Keep the medication in a secure place where others cannot get to it. FDA pregnancy category D. This medication can cause harm to an unborn baby. Do not use secobarbital without your doctor's consent if you are pregnant. Tell your doctor if you become pregnant during treatment. Use an effective form of birth control while you are using this medication. Secobarbital can make birth control pills less effective. Ask your doctor about using a non-hormone method of birth control (such as a condom, diaphragm, spermicide) to prevent pregnancy while taking secobarbital. Secobarbital can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take Seconal Sodium (secobarbital)?

Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Take secobarbital only when you are getting ready for several hours of sleep. You may fall asleep very quickly after taking the medicine. Take this medicine with a full glass of water.

If you are taking this medicine to treat insomnia, take it only at bedtime. Do not use secobarbital for longer than 2 weeks to treat insomnia, unless your doctor has told you to.

Do not change your dose of secobarbital without your doctor's advice. Tell your doctor if the medication does not seem to work as well in treating your condition.

Store secobarbital at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

Keep track of how many pills have been used from each new bottle of this medicine. Secobarbital is a drug of abuse and you should be aware if any person in the household is using this medicine improperly or without a prescription.

See also: Seconal Sodium dosage (in more detail)

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Take secobarbital only when you are getting ready for several hours of sleep. If you do not have time to get a full night's sleep after taking the medication, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at your next regularly scheduled sleep time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of secobarbital can be fatal.

Overdose symptoms may include slow or shallow breathing, blurred vision, extreme drowsiness, feeling light-headed, or fainting.

What should I avoid while taking Seconal Sodium (secobarbital)? Secobarbital can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert. Cold or allergy medicine, narcotic pain medicine, sleeping pills, muscle relaxers, and medicine for seizures, depression or anxiety can add to sleepiness caused by secobarbital. Tell your doctor if you regularly use any of these other medicines. Avoid drinking alcohol. It can increase some of the side effects of secobarbital. Seconal Sodium (secobarbital) side effects Secobarbital may cause a severe allergic reaction. Stop taking secobarbital and get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

restless muscle movements in your eyes, tongue, jaw, or neck;

slow heartbeat, shallow breathing;

feeling like you might pass out;

a fever or a sore throat;

sores in your mouth;

easy bruising or bleeding; or

ongoing nightmares or increased dreaming.

Less serious side effects may include:

drowsiness or dizziness;

problems with memory or concentration;

excitement (especially in children or older adults);

upset stomach, constipation;

headache; or

"hangover" effect (drowsiness the day after a dose).

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Seconal Sodium (secobarbital)?

Many drugs can interact with secobarbital. Below is just a partial list. Tell your doctor if you are using:

acetaminophen (Tylenol);

a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin);

an antibiotic such as doxycycline (Adoxa, Doryx, Mondox, Oracea, Vibramycin, and others), griseofulvin (Grisactin, Fulvicin PG, Grifulvin V), or metronidazole (Flagyl);

birth control pills or estrogen hormone replacement, including estrogen (Premarin), estradiol (Estrace, Femtrace, and others), progesterone (Progest, Prometrium), and others;

theophylline (Theo-Dur, Theochron, Theolair, Slo-Bid, others);

a heart rhythm medication such as quinidine (Cardioquin, Quinidex, Quinora, Quinaglute);

seizure medications such as carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol), divalproex (Depakote), phenytoin (Dilantin), or valproic acid (Depakene);

heart or blood pressure medication such as atenolol (Tenormin), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol), propranolol (Inderal, InnoPran), felodipine (Plendil) nifedipine (Procardia, Adalat), verapamil (Calan);

an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate); or

steroids such as prednisone (Orasone, Deltasone), prednisolone (Prelone, Delta Cortef), methylprednisolone (Medrol), and others.

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with secobarbital. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Seconal Sodium resources Seconal Sodium Side Effects (in more detail) Seconal Sodium Dosage Seconal Sodium Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Seconal Sodium Drug Interactions Seconal Sodium Support Group 2 Reviews for Seconal Sodium - Add your own review/rating Seconal Sodium Prescribing Information (FDA) Secobarbital MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Compare Seconal Sodium with other medications Insomnia Light Sedation Sedation Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about secobarbital.

See also: Seconal Sodium side effects (in more detail)


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Tenormin Tablets


Pronunciation: a-TEN-oh-lol
Generic Name: Atenolol
Brand Name: Tenormin

Do not suddenly stop taking Tenormin. Sharp chest pain, irregular heartbeat, and sometimes heart attack may occur if you suddenly stop Tenormin. The risk may be greater if you have certain types of heart disease. Your doctor should slowly lower your dose over several weeks if you need to stop taking it. This should be done even if you only take Tenormin for high blood pressure. Heart disease is common and you may not know you have it. Limit physical activity while you are lowering your dose. If new or worsened chest pain or other heart problems occur, contact your doctor right away. You may need to start taking Tenormin again.


Tenormin is used for:

Treating high blood pressure or chest pain caused by angina. It is also used to decrease death due to problems after a heart attack. It may also be used for other conditions as determined by your doctor.

Tenormin is a beta-blocker. It decreases the action of certain chemicals on the heart and blood vessels. This makes the heart beat more slowly and with less force. It also widens blood vessels. These actions help to lower blood pressure and decrease chest pain caused by angina.

Do NOT use Tenormin if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Tenormin you have a very slow heartbeat, heart block, uncontrolled heart failure, shock caused by serious heart problems, or low blood pressure after a heart attack you have an untreated adrenal gland tumor (pheochromocytoma) you are taking mibefradil

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Video: Treatment for Depression

Treatments for depression are getting better everyday and there are things you can start doing right away.

Before using Tenormin:

Tell your health care provider if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you have a history of any severe allergic reaction if you have a history of lung or breathing problems (eg, asthma, chronic bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD], emphysema), heart problems (eg, heart failure, conduction problems, left ventricle problems), blood vessel problems, diabetes, kidney problems, an adrenal gland tumor, or an overactive thyroid

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Tenormin. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any of the following medicines.

Clonidine because the risk of severe high blood pressure may be increased Mefloquine because the risk of irregular heartbeat may be increased Amiodarone, calcium channel blockers (eg, diltiazem, verapamil), catecholamine-depleting medicines (eg, reserpine), digoxin, disopyramide, flecainide, ketanserin, mibefradil, or quinidine because they may increase the risk of Tenormin's side effects Indomethacin or phenylpropanolamine because it may decrease Tenormin's effectiveness Bupivacaine, lidocaine, or quinazolines (eg, alfuzosin) because the risk of their side effects may be increased by Tenormin

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Tenormin may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Tenormin:

Use Tenormin as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Tenormin may be taken with or without food. Take Tenormin on a regular schedule to receive the most benefit from it. Taking Tenormin at the same time each day will help you remember to take it. Continue to take Tenormin even if you feel well. Do not miss any doses. Do not suddenly stop taking Tenormin without first checking with your doctor. Some conditions may become worse if you suddenly stop taking Tenormin. If you miss a dose of Tenormin, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Tenormin.

Important safety information: Tenormin may cause dizziness or drowsiness. These effects may be worse if you take it with alcohol or certain medicines. Use Tenormin with caution. Do not drive or perform other possibly unsafe tasks until you know how you react to it. Tenormin may cause dizziness, lightheadedness, or fainting; alcohol, hot weather, exercise, or fever may increase these effects. To prevent them, sit up or stand slowly, especially in the morning. Sit or lie down at the first sign of any of these effects. Tell your doctor or dentist that you take Tenormin before you receive any medical or dental care, emergency care, or surgery. Tenormin may reduce the amount of blood that flows to your feet and hands. This may cause them to feel cold and make you more sensitive to the cold. Dress warmly in cold weather. Be careful when you are out in the cold for long periods of time. Ask you doctor for more information. If you have a history of any severe allergic reaction, talk with your doctor. You may be at risk for an even more severe allergic reaction if you come into contact with the substance that caused your allergy. Some medicines used to treat severe allergies may also not work as well while you are using Tenormin. Patients who take medicine for high blood pressure often feel tired or run down for a few weeks after starting treatment. Be sure to take your medicine even if you may not feel "normal." Tell your doctor if you develop any new symptoms. Diabetes patients- Tenormin may hide signs of low blood sugar such as a rapid heartbeat. Other symptoms, such as sweating, may still occur. Check your blood sugar levels regularly. Ask your doctor before you change the dose of your diabetes medicine. Check your blood pressure and pulse regularly, as directed by your doctor. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for help if you are unsure how to properly measure your blood pressure or pulse. Lifestyle changes may also help reduce your blood pressure. Talk with your doctor about appropriate diet and exercise programs that may be helpful to you. Lab tests, including blood pressure and heart function tests, may be performed while you use Tenormin. These tests may be used to monitor your condition or check for side effects. Be sure to keep all doctor and lab appointments. Use Tenormin with caution in the ELDERLY; they may be more sensitive to its effects, especially dizziness. Tenormin should be used with extreme caution in CHILDREN; safety and effectiveness in children have not been determined. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: Tenormin has been shown to cause harm to the fetus. If you become pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Tenormin while you are pregnant. Tenormin is found in breast milk. If you are or will be breast-feeding while you use Tenormin, check with your doctor. Discuss any possible risks to your baby. Possible side effects of Tenormin:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome: Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Cold fingers and toes; diarrhea; dizziness; drowsiness; nausea; tiredness or weakness.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); blue fingernails, toenails, or palms; decreased sexual ability; fainting; mental or mood problems; persistent dizziness or lightheadedness; shortness of breath; sudden, unusual weight gain; swelling of hands, ankles, or feet; unusual bruising or bleeding; unusually slow heartbeat.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

See also: Tenormin side effects (in more detail)

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center, or emergency room immediately. Symptoms may include breathing problems; chest pain; fainting; pounding in the chest; seizures; severe dizziness; severe weakness; very slow heartbeat; wheezing.

Proper storage of Tenormin:

Store at controlled room temperature, between 59 and 86 degrees F (15 and 30 degrees C). Keep in a tight, light-resistant container. Keep Tenormin out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Tenormin, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Tenormin is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about Tenormin. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Tenormin resources Tenormin Side Effects (in more detail) Tenormin Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Tenormin Drug Interactions Tenormin Support Group 13 Reviews for Tenormin - Add your own review/rating Compare Tenormin with other medications Alcohol Withdrawal Angina Angina Pectoris Prophylaxis Anxiety Esophageal Variceal Hemorrhage Prophylaxis Heart Attack High Blood Pressure Migraine Prevention Mitral Valve Prolapse Supraventricular Tachycardia Ventricular Tachycardia
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Norpramin


Generic Name: desipramine (des IP ra meen)
Brand Names: Norpramin

What is Norpramin (desipramine)?

Desipramine is a tricyclic antidepressant. Desipramine affects chemicals in the brain that may become unbalanced.

Desipramine is used to treat symptoms of depression.

Desipramine may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Norpramin (desipramine)? Do not use this medication if you have recently had a heart attack, or if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days.

You may have thoughts about suicide when you first start taking an antidepressant, especially if you are younger than 24 years old. Your doctor will need to check you at regular visits for at least the first 12 weeks of treatment.

Video: Treatment for Depression

Treatments for depression are getting better everyday and there are things you can start doing right away.

Call your doctor at once if you have any new or worsening symptoms such as: mood or behavior changes, anxiety, panic attacks, trouble sleeping, or if you feel impulsive, irritable, agitated, hostile, aggressive, restless, hyperactive (mentally or physically), more depressed, or have thoughts about suicide or hurting yourself. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Norpramin (desipramine)? Do not use this medication if you are allergic to desipramine, or if you have recently had a heart attack. Do not use desipramine if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days. Serious, life-threatening side effects can occur if you take desipramine before the MAO inhibitor has cleared from your body.

If you have any of these other conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely take desipramine:

heart disease, or a history of heart attack, stroke, or seizures;

a family history of sudden death related to a heart rhythm disorder;

bipolar disorder (manic-depression);

schizophrenia or other mental illness;

liver disease;

overactive thyroid;

diabetes (desipramine may raise or lower blood sugar);

glaucoma; or

problems with urination.

You may have thoughts about suicide when you first start taking an antidepressant, especially if you are younger than 24 years old. Tell your doctor if you have worsening symptoms of depression or suicidal thoughts during the first several weeks of treatment, or whenever your dose is changed.

Your family or other caregivers should also be alert to changes in your mood or symptoms. Your doctor will need to check you at regular visits for at least the first 12 weeks of treatment.

Desipramine may be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether desipramine passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Older adults may be more likely to have side effects from this medication.

Do not give desipramine to anyone under 18 years old without the advice of a doctor. How should I take Norpramin (desipramine)?

Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results from this medication. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

If you need to have any type of surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are taking desipramine. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time.

Do not stop using desipramine without first talking to your doctor. You may need to use less and less before you stop the medication completely. Stopping this medication suddenly could cause you to have unpleasant side effects. It may take a few weeks of using this medicine before your symptoms improve. For best results, keep using the medication as directed. Talk with your doctor if your symptoms do not improve during treatment. Store desipramine at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at the next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of desipramine can be fatal. Symptoms may include uneven heartbeats, extreme drowsiness, vomiting, blurred vision, confusion, hallucinations, muscle stiffness, feeling hot or cold, seizure (convulsions), or coma. What should I avoid while taking Norpramin (desipramine)? Avoid drinking alcohol. It can cause dangerous side effects when taken together with desipramine.

Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with desipramine. Discuss the use of grapefruit products with your doctor before increasing or decreasing the amount of grapefruit products in your diet.

Desipramine can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert. Avoid exposure to sunlight or artificial UV rays (sunlamps or tanning beds). Desipramine can make your skin more sensitive to sunlight and sunburn may result. Use a sunscreen (minimum SPF 15) and wear protective clothing if you must be out in the sun. Norpramin (desipramine) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have any new or worsening symptoms such as: mood or behavior changes, anxiety, panic attacks, trouble sleeping, or if you feel impulsive, irritable, agitated, hostile, aggressive, restless, hyperactive (mentally or physically), more depressed, or have thoughts about suicide or hurting yourself.

Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

fast, pounding, or uneven heart rate;

seizure (convulsions);

chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, general ill feeling;

sudden numbness or weakness, especially on one side of the body;

sudden headache, problems with vision, speech, or balance;

easy bruising or bleeding, unusual weakness;

tremors, restless muscle movements in your eyes, tongue, jaw, or neck;

very stiff (rigid) muscles, high fever, sweating, confusion, tremors, feeling like you might pass out;

urinating less than usual or not at all;

extreme thirst with headache, nausea, vomiting, and weakness;

skin rash, severe tingling or numbness, pain and muscle weakness; or

nausea, stomach pain, low fever, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes).

Less serious side effects may include:

vomiting, constipation;

dry mouth, unpleasant taste;

weakness, lack of coordination;

feeling anxious, restless, dizzy, or drowsy;

sleep problems (insomnia), nightmares;

blurred vision, trouble concentrating, headache, ringing in your ears;

breast swelling (in men or women); or

decreased sex drive, impotence, or difficulty having an orgasm.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Norpramin (desipramine)? Cold or allergy medicine, sedatives, narcotic pain medicine, sleeping pills, muscle relaxers, and medicine for seizures or anxiety can add to sleepiness caused by desipramine. Tell your doctor if you regularly use any of these medicines, or any other antidepressants.

Before taking desipramine, tell your doctor if you have used an "SSRI" antidepressant in the past 5 weeks, such as citalopram (Celexa), escitalopram (Lexapro), fluoxetine (Prozac, Sarafem), fluvoxamine (Luvox), paroxetine (Paxil), or sertraline (Zoloft).

Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use, especially:

cimetidine (Tagamet); or

heart rhythm medications such as flecainide (Tambocor), propafenone (Rhythmol), or quinidine (Cardioquin, Quinidex, Quinaglute).

This list is not complete and there are many other medicines that can interact with desipramine. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list with you of all the medicines you use and show this list to any doctor or other healthcare provider who treats you.

More Norpramin resources Norpramin Side Effects (in more detail) Norpramin Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Norpramin Drug Interactions Norpramin Support Group 0 Reviews for Norpramin - Add your own review/rating Norpramin Prescribing Information (FDA) Norpramin MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Norpramin Monograph (AHFS DI) Norpramin Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Desipramine Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare Norpramin with other medications ADHD Depression Dysautonomia Vulvodynia Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about desipramine.

See also: Norpramin side effects (in more detail)


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chlordiazepoxide


Generic Name: chlordiazepoxide (klor dye az e POX ide)
Brand names: Librium, Libritabs, Poxi, Mitran

What is chlordiazepoxide?

Chlordiazepoxide is in a group of drugs called benzodiazepines (ben-zoe-dye-AZE-eh-peens). Chlordiazepoxide affects chemicals in the brain that may become unbalanced and cause anxiety.

Chlordiazepoxide is used to treat anxiety disorders or alcohol withdrawal.

Chlordiazepoxide may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about chlordiazepoxide? Do not use this medication if you are allergic to chlordiazepoxide or to other benzodiazepines, such as alprazolam (Xanax), clorazepate (Tranxene), diazepam (Valium), lorazepam (Ativan), or oxazepam (Serax). This medication can cause birth defects in an unborn baby. Do not use chlordiazepoxide if you are pregnant.

Before taking chlordiazepoxide, tell your doctor if you have any breathing problems, glaucoma, porphyria, kidney or liver disease, or a history of depression, suicidal thoughts, or addiction to drugs or alcohol.

Video: Treatment for Depression

Treatments for depression are getting better everyday and there are things you can start doing right away.

Do not drink alcohol while taking chlordiazepoxide. This medication can increase the effects of alcohol.

Tell your doctor if you regularly use other medicines that make you sleepy. They can add to sleepiness caused by chlordiazepoxide.

Chlordiazepoxide may be habit-forming and should be used only by the person it was prescribed for. Chlordiazepoxide should never be shared with another person, especially someone who has a history of drug abuse or addiction. Keep the medication in a secure place where others cannot get to it. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking chlordiazepoxide? Do not use this medication if you are allergic to chlordiazepoxide or to other benzodiazepines, such as alprazolam (Xanax), clorazepate (Tranxene), diazepam (Valium), lorazepam (Ativan), or oxazepam (Serax).

Before taking chlordiazepoxide, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have:

glaucoma;

asthma, emphysema, bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD), or other breathing problems;

porphyria;

kidney or liver disease;

a history of depression or suicidal thoughts or behavior; or

a history of drug or alcohol addiction.

If you have any of these conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely take this medication.

Chlordiazepoxide may be habit-forming and should be used only by the person it was prescribed for. Chlordiazepoxide should never be shared with another person, especially someone who has a history of drug abuse or addiction. Keep the medication in a secure place where others cannot get to it. Chlordiazepoxide can cause birth defects in an unborn baby. Do not use chlordiazepoxide without your doctor's consent if you are pregnant. Tell your doctor if you become pregnant during treatment. Use an effective form of birth control while you are using this medication. Chlordiazepoxide may pass into breast milk and could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. The sedative effects of chlordiazepoxide may last longer in older adults. Accidental falls are common in elderly patients who take benzodiazepines. Use caution to avoid falling or accidental injury while you are taking chlordiazepoxide. How should I take chlordiazepoxide?

Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results from this medication.

Chlordiazepoxide should be used for only a short time. Do not take this medication for longer than 4 months without your doctor's advice. Contact your doctor if this medicine seems to stop working as well in treating your symptoms. Do not stop using chlordiazepoxide suddenly, or you could have seizures or unpleasant withdrawal symptoms. Talk to your doctor about how to avoid withdrawal symptoms when you stop using chlordiazepoxide.

To be sure this medication is not causing harmful effects, your blood and liver function may need to be tested on a regular basis. Do not miss any scheduled visits to your doctor.

Store chlordiazepoxide at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light.

Keep track of how many pills have been used from each new bottle of this medicine. Benzodiazepines are drugs of abuse and you should be aware if any person in the household is using this medicine improperly or without a prescription.

See also: Chlordiazepoxide dosage (in more detail)

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at your next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of chlordiazepoxide can be fatal.

Overdose symptoms may include extreme drowsiness, confusion, excitation, muscle weakness, loss of balance or coordination, feeling light-headed, fainting, or coma.

What should I avoid while taking chlordiazepoxide? Do not drink alcohol while taking chlordiazepoxide. This medication can increase the effects of alcohol. Chlordiazepoxide can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert.

Cold or allergy medicine, narcotic pain medicine, sleeping pills, muscle relaxers, and medicine for seizures, or depression can add to sleepiness caused by chlordiazepoxide. Tell your doctor if you regularly use any of these medicines, or any other anxiety medications.

Chlordiazepoxide side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

confusion;

depressed mood, thoughts of suicide or hurting yourself;

restless muscle movements in your eyes, tongue, jaw, or neck;

hyperactivity, agitation, hostility;

hallucinations; or

jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes).

Less serious side effects may include:

drowsiness, tiredness;

swelling;

skin rash;

nausea, vomiting, constipation; or

irregular menstrual periods.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Chlordiazepoxide Dosing Information

Usual Adult Dose for Anxiety:

Moderate anxiety: 5 to 10 mg orally 3 to 4 times a day.
Severe anxiety: 20 to 25 mg orally 3 to 4 times a day or 50 to 100 mg IM or IV followed by 25 to 50 mg 3 to 4 times a day if necessary.

Usual Adult Dose for Light Sedation:

For light sedation prior to a medical or surgical procedure.
Oral: 5 mg 3 times a day may be started several days before the procedure.
IM: 50 mg one hour before the procedure

Usual Adult Dose for Alcohol Withdrawal:

IM or IV: 50 to 100 mg initially. May repeat in 2 to 4 hours if necessary.
Oral: 50 to 100 mg followed by repeated doses as needed until agitation is controlled (up to 300 mg/day).
Dosage should then be reduced to maintenance levels.

What other drugs will affect chlordiazepoxide?

Before taking chlordiazepoxide, tell your doctor if you are using any of the following drugs:

a barbiturate such as amobarbital (Amytal), butabarbital (Butisol), mephobarbital (Mebaral), secobarbital (Seconal), or phenobarbital (Solfoton);

a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin); or

an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate);

medicine to treat psychiatric disorders, such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), haloperidol (Haldol), mesoridazine (Serentil), pimozide (Orap), or thioridazine (Mellaril);

narcotic medication such as butorphanol (Stadol), codeine, hydrocodone (Lortab, Vicodin), levorphanol (Levo-Dromoran), meperidine (Demerol), methadone (Dolophine, Methadose), morphine (Kadian, MS Contin, Oramorph), naloxone (Narcan), oxycodone (OxyContin), propoxyphene (Darvon, Darvocet); or

an antidepressant such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Etrafon), amoxapine (Asendin), citalopram (Celexa), clomipramine (Anafranil), desipramine (Norpramin), doxepin (Sinequan), escitalopram (Lexapro), fluoxetine (Prozac, Sarafem), imipramine (Janimine, Tofranil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), paroxetine (Paxil), protriptyline (Vivactil), sertraline (Zoloft), or trimipramine (Surmontil).

This is not a complete list and there may be other drugs that can interact with chlordiazepoxide. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

More chlordiazepoxide resources Chlordiazepoxide Side Effects (in more detail) Chlordiazepoxide Dosage Chlordiazepoxide Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Chlordiazepoxide Drug Interactions Chlordiazepoxide Support Group 34 Reviews for Chlordiazepoxide - Add your own review/rating chlordiazepoxide Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Chlordiazepoxide Prescribing Information (FDA) Chlordiazepoxide Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Chlordiazepoxide Monograph (AHFS DI) Chlordiazepoxide MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Librium Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare chlordiazepoxide with other medications Alcohol Withdrawal Anxiety Burning Mouth Syndrome Light Sedation Opiate Withdrawal Panic Disorder Tardive Dyskinesia Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about chlordiazepoxide.

See also: chlordiazepoxide side effects (in more detail)


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Pamelor


Generic Name: nortriptyline (nor TRIP ti leen)
Brand Names: Pamelor

What is Pamelor (nortriptyline)?

Nortriptyline is in a group of drugs called tricyclic antidepressants. Nortriptyline affects chemicals in the brain that may become unbalanced.

Nortriptyline is used to treat symptoms of depression.

Nortriptyline may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Pamelor (nortriptyline)? Do not use nortriptyline if you have recently had a heart attack, or if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days.

You may have thoughts about suicide when you first start taking an antidepressant, especially if you are younger than 24 years old. Your doctor will need to check you at regular visits for at least the first 12 weeks of treatment.

Video: Treatment for Depression

Treatments for depression are getting better everyday and there are things you can start doing right away.

Call your doctor at once if you have any new or worsening symptoms such as: mood or behavior changes, anxiety, panic attacks, trouble sleeping, or if you feel impulsive, irritable, agitated, hostile, aggressive, restless, hyperactive (mentally or physically), more depressed, or have thoughts about suicide or hurting yourself. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Pamelor (nortriptyline)? Do not use this medication if you are allergic to nortriptyline, or if you have recently had a heart attack. Do not use nortriptyline if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days. Serious, life-threatening side effects can occur if you take nortriptyline before the MAO inhibitor has cleared from your body.

Before taking nortriptyline, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have:

heart disease;

a history of heart attack, stroke, or seizures;

bipolar disorder (manic-depression);

schizophrenia or other mental illness;

diabetes (nortriptyline may raise or lower blood sugar);

overactive thyroid;

glaucoma; or

problems with urination.

If you have any of these conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely take nortriptyline.

You may have thoughts about suicide when you first start taking an antidepressant, especially if you are younger than 24 years old. Tell your doctor if you have worsening symptoms of depression or suicidal thoughts during the first several weeks of treatment, or whenever your dose is changed.

Your family or other caregivers should also be alert to changes in your mood or symptoms. Your doctor will need to check you at regular visits for at least the first 12 weeks of treatment.

This medication may be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether nortriptyline passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Older adults may be more likely to have side effects from this medication.

Do not give this medication to anyone under 18 years old without the advice of a doctor. How should I take Pamelor (nortriptyline)?

Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results from this medication. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

If you need to have any type of surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are taking nortriptyline. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time.

Do not stop using nortriptyline without first talking to your doctor. You may need to use less and less before you stop the medication completely. Stopping this medication suddenly could cause you to have unpleasant side effects. It may take a few weeks of using this medicine before your symptoms improve. For best results, keep using the medication as directed. Talk with your doctor if your symptoms do not improve during treatment with nortriptyline. Store nortriptyline at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

See also: Pamelor dosage (in more detail)

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at the next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of nortriptyline can be fatal.

Overdose symptoms may include extreme drowsiness, confusion, agitation, hallucinations, blurred vision, vomiting, muscle stiffness, feeling hot or cold, fainting, seizure (convulsions), or coma.

What should I avoid while taking Pamelor (nortriptyline)? Avoid drinking alcohol. It can cause dangerous side effects when taken together with nortriptyline.

Avoid using other medicines that make you sleepy (such as cold medicine, pain medication, muscle relaxers, medicine for seizures, or other antidepressants). They can add to sleepiness caused by nortriptyline.

Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with nortriptyline. Discuss the use of grapefruit products with your doctor before increasing or decreasing the amount of grapefruit products in your diet.

Nortriptyline can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert. Avoid exposure to sunlight or artificial UV rays (sunlamps or tanning beds). Nortriptyline can make your skin more sensitive to sunlight and sunburn may result. Use a sunscreen (minimum SPF 15) and wear protective clothing if you must be out in the sun. Pamelor (nortriptyline) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have any new or worsening symptoms such as: mood or behavior changes, anxiety, panic attacks, trouble sleeping, or if you feel impulsive, irritable, agitated, hostile, aggressive, restless, hyperactive (mentally or physically), more depressed, or have thoughts about suicide or hurting yourself.

Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

fast, pounding, or uneven heart rate;

chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, general ill feeling;

sudden numbness or weakness, especially on one side of the body;

sudden headache, confusion, problems with vision, speech, or balance;

confusion, hallucinations, or seizure (convulsions);

easy bruising or bleeding, unusual weakness;

restless muscle movements in your eyes, tongue, jaw, or neck;

tremors;

extreme thirst with headache, nausea, vomiting, and weakness;

feeling light-headed or fainting; or

urinating less than usual or not at all.

Less serious side effects may include:

nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, loss of appetite;

constipation or diarrhea;

weight changes;

dry mouth, unpleasant taste;

weakness, lack of coordination;

numbness or tingly feeling;

blurred vision, headache, ringing in your ears;

mild skin rash;

breast swelling (in men or women); or

increased sweating.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Pamelor (nortriptyline)?

Before taking nortriptyline, tell your doctor if you have used an "SSRI" antidepressant in the past 5 weeks, such as citalopram (Celexa), escitalopram (Lexapro), fluoxetine (Prozac, Sarafem), fluvoxamine (Luvox), paroxetine (Paxil), or sertraline (Zoloft).

Before taking nortriptyline, tell your doctor if you are currently using any of the following drugs:

cimetidine (Tagamet);

guanethidine (Ismelin);

reserpine; or

heart rhythm medications such as flecainide (Tambocor), propafenone (Rhythmol), or quinidine (Cardioquin, Quinidex, Quinaglute).

This list is not complete and there are many other medicines that can interact with nortriptyline. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list with you of all the medicines you use and show this list to any doctor or other healthcare provider who treats you.

More Pamelor resources Pamelor Side Effects (in more detail) Pamelor Dosage Pamelor Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Pamelor Drug Interactions Pamelor Support Group 17 Reviews for Pamelor - Add your own review/rating Pamelor Prescribing Information (FDA) Pamelor MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Pamelor Monograph (AHFS DI) Pamelor Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Nortriptyline Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare Pamelor with other medications Burning Mouth Syndrome Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome Depression Diabetic Nerve Damage Dysautonomia Migraine Prevention Neuralgia Neurosis Pain Panic Disorder Persisting Pain, Shingles Primary Nocturnal Enuresis Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome Smoking Cessation Tinnitus Vulvodynia Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about nortriptyline.

See also: Pamelor side effects (in more detail)


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Adapin


Generic Name: doxepin (Sinequan) (DOX e pin)
Brand Names: Sinequan

What is doxepin (Sinequan)?

Doxepin is in a group of drugs called tricyclic antidepressants. Doxepin affects chemicals in the brain that may become unbalanced.

Doxepin (Sinequan or other generic name) is used to treat symptoms of depression and/or anxiety associated with alcoholism, psychiatric conditions, or manic-depressive conditions.

Doxepin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about doxepin (Sinequan)? You should not use doxepin if you are allergic to it, or if you have glaucoma or problems with urination. Do not use doxepin if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as furazolidone (Furoxone), isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days. Serious, life-threatening side effects can occur if you take doxepin before the MAO inhibitor has cleared from your body.

You may have thoughts about suicide when you first start taking an antidepressant, especially if you are younger than 24 years old. Your doctor will need to check you at regular visits for at least the first 12 weeks of treatment.

Video: Treatment for Depression

Treatments for depression are getting better everyday and there are things you can start doing right away.

Report any new or worsening symptoms to your doctor, such as: mood or behavior changes, anxiety, panic attacks, trouble sleeping, or if you feel impulsive, irritable, agitated, hostile, aggressive, restless, hyperactive (mentally or physically), more depressed, or have thoughts about suicide or hurting yourself. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking doxepin (Sinequan)? You should not use doxepin if you are allergic to it, or if you have glaucoma or problems with urination. Do not use doxepin if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as furazolidone (Furoxone), isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days. Serious, life-threatening side effects can occur if you take doxepin before the MAO inhibitor has cleared from your body.

To make sure you can safely take doxepin, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

sleep apnea (breathing stops during sleep); or

bipolar disorder (manic-depression).

diabetes (doxepin may raise or lower blood sugar).

You may have thoughts about suicide while taking an antidepressant, especially if you are younger than 24 years old. Tell your doctor if you have worsening depression or suicidal thoughts during the first several weeks of treatment, or whenever your dose is changed.

Your family or other caregivers should also be alert to changes in your mood or symptoms. Your doctor will need to check you at regular visits for at least the first 12 weeks of treatment.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether doxepin will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication. It is not known whether doxepin passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. Do not give doxepin to anyone younger than 18 years old without the advice of a doctor. How should I take doxepin (Sinequan)?

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results.

Measure doxepin oral concentrate (liquid) with the special dose-measuring dropper provided. Do not use a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring dropper, ask your pharmacist for one.

Empty the measured dose from the medicine dropper into a small glass (4 ounces) of water, milk, orange juice, grapefruit juice, tomato juice, prune juice, or pineapple juice. Do not use grape juice or a carbonated soft drink to mix doxepin oral concentrate. Stir the mixture and drink all of it right away. Do not save it for later use.

It may take 2 to 3 weeks before your depression symptoms improve. Keep using the medication as directed and tell your doctor if your symptoms do not improve. Do not stop using doxepin suddenly after long-term use, or you could have unpleasant withdrawal symptoms. Ask your doctor how to avoid withdrawal symptoms when you stop using doxepin. Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. An overdose of doxepin can be fatal.

Overdose symptoms may include uneven heartbeats, extreme drowsiness, agitation, vomiting, dilated pupils, blurred vision, confusion, hallucinations, feeling hot or cold, muscle stiffness, feeling light-headed, fainting, seizure (convulsions), or coma.

What should I avoid while taking doxepin (Sinequan)? Do not drink alcohol. Doxepin can increase the effects of alcohol, which could be dangerous. Doxepin may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert. Doxepin (Sinequan) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Report any new or worsening symptoms to your doctor, such as: mood or behavior changes, anxiety, panic attacks, trouble sleeping, or if you feel impulsive, irritable, agitated, hostile, aggressive, restless, hyperactive (mentally or physically), more depressed, or have thoughts about suicide or hurting yourself.

Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

fast heart rate;

confusion, hallucinations, unusual thoughts, seizure (convulsions);

easy bruising, unusual bleeding (nose, mouth, vagina, or rectum), purple or red pinpoint spots under your skin;

feeling like you might pass out;

restless muscle movements in your eyes, tongue, jaw, or neck;

tremors or uncontrollable shaking;

urinating less than usual or not at all; or

extreme thirst with headache, nausea, vomiting, and weakness.

Less serious side effects may include:

feeling dizzy, drowsy, or tired;

nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, loss of appetite;

dry mouth, increased sweating;

weight gain;

lack of coordination;

numbness or tingly feeling;

blurred vision, headache, ringing in your ears;

mild skin rash or itching;

decreased sex drive; or

breast swelling (in men).

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect doxepin (Sinequan)? Cold or allergy medicine, sedatives, narcotic pain medicine, sleeping pills, muscle relaxers, and medicine for seizures or anxiety can add to sleepiness caused by doxepin. Tell your doctor if you regularly use any of these medicines, or any other antidepressant.

Before taking doxepin, tell your doctor if you have used an "SSRI" antidepressant in the past 5 weeks, such as citalopram (Celexa), escitalopram (Lexapro), fluoxetine (Prozac, Sarafem), fluvoxamine (Luvox), paroxetine (Paxil), or sertraline (Zoloft).

Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use, especially:

cimetidine (Tagamet);

tolazamide (Tolinase);

heart rhythm medications such as flecainide (Tambocor), propafenone (Rhythmol), or quinidine (Quin-G); or

phenothiazines such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), fluphenazine (Permitil, Prolixin), perphenazine (Trilafon), prochlorperazine (Compazine, Compro), promethazine (Pentazine, Phenergan, Anergan, Antinaus), thioridazine (Mellaril), or trifluoperazine (Stelazine), and others.

There are many other drugs that can interact with doxepin. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list of all your medicines and show it to any healthcare provider who treats you. More Adapin resources Adapin Side Effects (in more detail) Adapin Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Adapin Drug Interactions Adapin Support Group 1 Review for Adapin - Add your own review/rating Doxepin Prescribing Information (FDA) doxepin Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Doxepin MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Doxepin Hydrochloride Monograph (AHFS DI) Silenor Consumer Overview Sinequan Prescribing Information (FDA) Sinequan Monograph (AHFS DI) Sinequan MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Compare Adapin with other medications Anxiety Depression Insomnia Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome Urticaria Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about doxepin (Sinequan).

See also: Adapin side effects (in more detail)


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Xanax XR Extended-Release Tablets


Pronunciation: al-PRA-zoe-lam
Generic Name: Alprazolam
Brand Name: Xanax XR
Xanax XR Extended-Release Tablets are used for:

Treating panic disorder. It may also be used to treat other conditions as determined by your doctor.

Xanax XR Extended-Release Tablets are a benzodiazepine. It works in the brain to decrease anxiety.

Do NOT use Xanax XR Extended-Release Tablets if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Xanax XR Extended-Release Tablets or other benzodiazepines (eg, diazepam) you have acute narrow-angle glaucoma you are taking delavirdine, itraconazole, ketoconazole, or sodium oxybate (GHB)

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Video: Treatment for Depression

Treatments for depression are getting better everyday and there are things you can start doing right away.

Before using Xanax XR Extended-Release Tablets:

Some medical conditions may interact with Xanax XR Extended-Release Tablets. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are able to become pregnant if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you have a history of seizures, glaucoma or increased pressure in the eye, kidney or liver problems, lung or breathing problems (eg, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD], sleep apnea), myasthenia gravis, or a blood disorder known as porphyria if you have a history of other mental or mood problems (eg, depression), alcohol or other substance abuse or dependence, or suicidal thoughts or actions if you are in poor health, are very overweight, or are experiencing abnormal muscle movements if you drink alcoholic beverages or you smoke

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Xanax XR Extended-Release Tablets. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Methadone because it may increase the risk of serious and sometimes fatal breathing problems Amiodarone, azole antifungals (eg, itraconazole, ketoconazole), cimetidine, cyclosporine, delavirdine, diltiazem, ergot alkaloids (eg, ergotamine), fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, isoniazid, macrolide antibiotics (eg, clarithromycin, erythromycin), nefazodone, nicardipine, nifedipine, omeprazole, oral contraceptives (birth control pills), paroxetine, propoxyphene, protease inhibitors (eg, boceprevir, ritonavir), sodium oxybate (GHB), telithromycin, or valproic acid because they may increase the risk of Xanax XR Extended-Release Tablets's side effects Carbamazepine, rifamycins (eg, rifampin), or St. John's wort because they may decrease Xanax XR Extended-Release Tablets's effectiveness Clozapine or tricyclic antidepressants (eg, desipramine, imipramine) because the risk of their side effects may be increased by Xanax XR Extended-Release Tablets Hydantoins (eg, phenytoin) because the risk of their side effects may be increased and they may decrease Xanax XR Extended-Release Tablets's effectiveness

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Xanax XR Extended-Release Tablets may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Xanax XR Extended-Release Tablets:

Use Xanax XR Extended-Release Tablets as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Xanax XR Extended-Release Tablets may be taken with or without food. If stomach upset occurs, take with food to reduce stomach irritation. Swallow whole. Do not break, crush, or chew before swallowing. Do not suddenly stop taking Xanax XR Extended-Release Tablets. You may have an increased risk of side effects, including seizure. If you need to stop Xanax XR Extended-Release Tablets, your doctor will gradually lower your dose. Check with your doctor before eating grapefruit or drinking grapefruit juice while you take Xanax XR Extended-Release Tablets. If you miss a dose of Xanax XR Extended-Release Tablets, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Xanax XR Extended-Release Tablets.

Important safety information: Xanax XR Extended-Release Tablets may cause drowsiness, dizziness, light-headedness, or blurred vision. Do not drive, operate machinery, or do anything else that could be dangerous until you know how you react to Xanax XR Extended-Release Tablets. Using Xanax XR Extended-Release Tablets alone, with certain other medicines, or with alcohol may lessen your ability to drive or to perform other potentially dangerous tasks. Do not drink alcohol while you are using Xanax XR Extended-Release Tablets. Check with your doctor before you use medicines that may cause drowsiness (eg, sleep aids, muscle relaxers) while you are using Xanax XR Extended-Release Tablets; it may add to their effects. Ask your pharmacist if you have questions about which medicines may cause drowsiness. Do not take more than the recommended dose or use for longer than prescribed without checking with your doctor. Smoking may decrease Xanax XR Extended-Release Tablets's effectiveness. Tell your doctor if you smoke or if you have recently stopped smoking. Tell your doctor or dentist that you take Xanax XR Extended-Release Tablets before you receive any medical or dental care, emergency care, or surgery. Use Xanax XR Extended-Release Tablets with caution in the ELDERLY; they may be more sensitive to its effects, especially decreased coordination and drowsiness. Xanax XR Extended-Release Tablets should be used with extreme caution in CHILDREN younger than 18 years old; safety and effectiveness in these children have not been confirmed. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: Xanax XR Extended-Release Tablets may cause harm to the fetus. If you think you may be pregnant, discuss with your doctor the benefits and risks of using Xanax XR Extended-Release Tablets during pregnancy. Xanax XR Extended-Release Tablets are found in breast milk. Do not breast-feed while taking Xanax XR Extended-Release Tablets.

When used for long periods of time or at high doses, Xanax XR Extended-Release Tablets may not work as well and may require higher doses to obtain the same effect as when originally taken. This is known as TOLERANCE. Talk with your doctor if Xanax XR Extended-Release Tablets stops working well. Do not take more than prescribed.

Some people who use Xanax XR Extended-Release Tablets may develop a need to continue taking it. People who take higher doses or use Xanax XR Extended-Release Tablets for a long time have a greater risk. This is known as DEPENDENCE or addiction. If you stop taking Xanax XR Extended-Release Tablets suddenly, you may have WITHDRAWAL symptoms. These may include blurred vision; burning, numbness, or tingling; changes in smell or other senses; decreased appetite; decreased awareness of your surroundings; decreased concentration; diarrhea; muscle cramps or twitches; seizures; or weight loss.

Possible side effects of Xanax XR Extended-Release Tablets:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Changes in appetite; constipation; decreased sexual desire or ability; diarrhea; dizziness; drowsiness; dry mouth; light-headedness; nausea; tiredness; weight changes.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue; unusual hoarseness); behavior changes; blurred vision; burning, numbness, or tingling; chest pain; confusion; dark urine; decreased coordination; decreased urination; fainting; fast or irregular heartbeat; hallucinations; loss of balance or muscle control; memory or attention problems; menstrual changes; muscle twitching; new or worsening mental or mood changes (eg, depression, irritability, anxiety; exaggerated feeling of well-being); overstimulation; red, swollen blistered, or peeling skin; severe or persistent dizziness, drowsiness, or light-headedness; shortness of breath or trouble breathing; suicidal thoughts or actions; tremor; trouble speaking; yellowing of the eyes or skin.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

See also: Xanax XR side effects (in more detail)

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center, or emergency room immediately. Symptoms may include confusion; loss of consciousness; loss of coordination; severe drowsiness or deep sleep; slow reflexes.

Proper storage of Xanax XR Extended-Release Tablets:

Store Xanax XR Extended-Release Tablets at room temperature, between 59 and 86 degrees F (15 and 30 degrees C) in a tightly closed container, away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Xanax XR Extended-Release Tablets out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Xanax XR Extended-Release Tablets, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Xanax XR Extended-Release Tablets are to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about Xanax XR Extended-Release Tablets. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Xanax XR resources Xanax XR Side Effects (in more detail) Xanax XR Dosage Xanax XR Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Xanax XR Drug Interactions Xanax XR Support Group 24 Reviews for Xanax XR - Add your own review/rating Compare Xanax XR with other medications Anxiety Depression Dysautonomia Panic Disorder Tinnitus
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Tofranil


Generic Name: imipramine (im IP ra meen)
Brand Names: Tofranil, Tofranil-PM

What is Tofranil (imipramine)?

Imipramine is in a group of drugs called tricyclic antidepressants. Imipramine affects chemicals in the brain that may become unbalanced.

Imipramine is used to treat symptoms of depression.

Imipramine may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Tofranil (imipramine)? Do not use imipramine if you have recently had a heart attack, or if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days.

You may have thoughts about suicide when you first start taking an antidepressant, especially if you are younger than 24 years old. Your doctor will need to check you at regular visits for at least the first 12 weeks of treatment.

Video: Treatment for Depression

Treatments for depression are getting better everyday and there are things you can start doing right away.

Call your doctor at once if you have any new or worsening symptoms such as: mood or behavior changes, anxiety, panic attacks, trouble sleeping, or if you feel impulsive, irritable, agitated, hostile, aggressive, restless, hyperactive (mentally or physically), more depressed, or have thoughts about suicide or hurting yourself. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Tofranil (imipramine)? Do not use this medication if you are allergic to imipramine, or if you have recently had a heart attack. Do not use imipramine if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days. Serious, life-threatening side effects can occur if you take imipramine before the MAO inhibitor has cleared from your body.

Before taking imipramine, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have:

heart disease;

a history of heart attack, stroke, or seizures;

bipolar disorder (manic-depression);

kidney or liver disease;

overactive thyroid;

diabetes (imipramine may raise or lower blood sugar);

adrenal gland tumor (pheochromocytoma);

glaucoma; or

problems with urination.

If you have any of these conditions, you may not be able to use imipramine, or you may need a dosage adjustment or special tests during treatment.

You may have thoughts about suicide when you first start taking an antidepressant, especially if you are younger than 24 years old. Tell your doctor if you have worsening symptoms of depression or suicidal thoughts during the first several weeks of treatment, or whenever your dose is changed.

Your family or other caregivers should also be alert to changes in your mood or symptoms. Your doctor will need to check you at regular visits for at least the first 12 weeks of treatment.

This medication may be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. Imipramine can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. Do not give this medication to anyone younger than 18 years old without the advice of a doctor. How should I take Tofranil (imipramine)?

Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results from this medication. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

If you need to have any type of surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are taking imipramine. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time.

Do not stop using imipramine without first talking to your doctor. You may need to use less and less before you stop the medication completely. Stopping this medication suddenly could cause you to have unpleasant side effects. It may take up to 3 weeks of using this medicine before your symptoms improve. For best results, keep using the medication as directed. Talk with your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after 3 weeks of treatment. Store imipramine at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at the next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of imipramine can be fatal.

Symptoms of an imipramine overdose may include uneven heartbeats, extreme drowsiness, agitation, vomiting, blurred vision, sweating, muscle stiffness, swelling, shortness of breath, blue lips or fingernails, feeling light-headed, fainting, seizure (convulsions), or coma.

What should I avoid while taking Tofranil (imipramine)? Avoid drinking alcohol. It can cause dangerous side effects when taken together with imipramine.

Avoid using other medicines that make you sleepy (such as cold medicine, pain medication, muscle relaxers, medicine for seizures, or other antidepressants). They can add to sleepiness caused by imipramine.

Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with imipramine. Discuss the use of grapefruit products with your doctor before increasing or decreasing the amount of grapefruit products in your diet.

Imipramine can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert. Avoid exposure to sunlight or artificial UV rays (sunlamps or tanning beds). Imipramine can make your skin more sensitive to sunlight and sunburn may result. Use a sunscreen (minimum SPF 15) and wear protective clothing if you must be out in the sun. Tofranil (imipramine) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have any new or worsening symptoms such as: mood or behavior changes, anxiety, panic attacks, trouble sleeping, or if you feel impulsive, irritable, agitated, hostile, aggressive, restless, hyperactive (mentally or physically), more depressed, or have thoughts about suicide or hurting yourself.

Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

fast, pounding, or uneven heart rate;

chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, general ill feeling;

sudden numbness or weakness, especially on one side of the body;

sudden headache, confusion, problems with vision, speech, or balance;

feeling short of breath, even with mild exertion;

swelling, rapid weight gain;

confusion, hallucinations, or seizure (convulsions);

easy bruising or bleeding, unusual weakness;

restless muscle movements in your eyes, tongue, jaw, or neck;

urinating more or less than usual;

extreme thirst with headache, nausea, vomiting, and weakness;

skin rash, bruising, severe tingling, numbness, pain, or muscle weakness.

Less serious side effects may be more likely to occur, such as:

nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, loss of appetite;

constipation or diarrhea;

dry mouth, unpleasant taste;

weight changes;

weakness, lack of coordination;

feeling dizzy, drowsy, or tired;

nightmares;

blurred vision, headache, ringing in your ears;

breast swelling (in men or women); or

decreased sex drive, impotence, or difficulty having an orgasm.

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Tofranil (imipramine)?

Before taking imipramine, tell your doctor if you have used an "SSRI" antidepressant in the past 5 weeks, such as citalopram (Celexa), escitalopram (Lexapro), fluoxetine (Prozac, Sarafem), fluvoxamine (Luvox), paroxetine (Paxil), or sertraline (Zoloft).

Before taking imipramine, tell your doctor if you are currently using any of the following drugs:

cimetidine (Tagamet);

clonidine (Catapres);

guanethidine (Ismelin);

methylphenidate (Concerta, Ritalin, Daytrana); or

heart rhythm medications such as flecainide (Tambocor), propafenone (Rhythmol), or quinidine (Cardioquin, Quinidex, Quinaglute).

If you are using any of these drugs, you may not be able to use imipramine, or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment.

There are many other medicines that can interact with imipramine. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list with you of all the medicines you use and show this list to any doctor or other healthcare provider who treats you.

More Tofranil resources Tofranil Side Effects (in more detail) Tofranil Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Tofranil Drug Interactions Tofranil Support Group 9 Reviews for Tofranil - Add your own review/rating Tofranil MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Tofranil Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Tofranil Prescribing Information (FDA) Imipramine Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Imipramine Prescribing Information (FDA) Imipramine Hydrochloride Monograph (AHFS DI) Tofranil-PM Prescribing Information (FDA) Tofranil-PM MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Compare Tofranil with other medications ADHD Depression Interstitial Cystitis Night Terrors Pain Panic Disorder Primary Nocturnal Enuresis Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has information about imipramine written for health professionals that you may read.

See also: Tofranil side effects (in more detail)


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Xanax


Pronunciation: al-PRA-zoe-lam
Generic Name: Alprazolam
Brand Name: Xanax
Xanax is used for:

Treating anxiety and panic disorder. It may also be used to treat other conditions as determined by your doctor.

Xanax is a benzodiazepine. It works in the brain to decrease anxiety.

Do NOT use Xanax if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Xanax or other benzodiazepines (eg, diazepam) you have acute narrow-angle glaucoma you are taking delavirdine, itraconazole, ketoconazole, or sodium oxybate (GHB)

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Video: Treatment for Depression

Treatments for depression are getting better everyday and there are things you can start doing right away.

Before using Xanax:

Some medical conditions may interact with Xanax. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are able to become pregnant if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you have a history of seizures, glaucoma or increased pressure in the eye, kidney or liver problems, lung or breathing problems (eg, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD], sleep apnea), myasthenia gravis, or a blood disorder known as porphyria if you have a history of other mental or mood problems (eg, depression), alcohol or other substance abuse or dependence, or suicidal thoughts or actions if you are in poor health, are very overweight, or are experiencing abnormal muscle movements if you drink alcoholic beverages or you smoke

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Xanax. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Methadone because it may increase the risk of serious and sometimes fatal breathing problems Amiodarone, azole antifungals (eg, itraconazole, ketoconazole), cimetidine, cyclosporine, delavirdine, diltiazem, ergot alkaloids (eg, ergotamine), fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, isoniazid, macrolide antibiotics (eg, clarithromycin, erythromycin), nefazodone, nicardipine, nifedipine, omeprazole, oral contraceptives (birth control pills), paroxetine, propoxyphene, protease inhibitors (eg, boceprevir, ritonavir), sodium oxybate (GHB), telithromycin, or valproic acid because they may increase the risk of Xanax's side effects Carbamazepine, rifamycins (eg, rifampin), or St. John's wort because they may decrease Xanax's effectiveness Hydantoins (eg, phenytoin) because the risk of their side effects may be increased and they may decrease Xanax's effectiveness Clozapine or tricyclic antidepressants (eg, desipramine, imipramine) because the risk of their side effects may be increased by Xanax

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Xanax may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Xanax:

Use Xanax as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Xanax may be taken with or without food. If stomach upset occurs, take with food to reduce stomach irritation. If you are taking Xanax regularly, do not suddenly stop taking it without checking with your doctor. You may have an increased risk of side effects, including seizure. If you need to stop Xanax, your doctor will gradually lower your dose. Check with your doctor before eating grapefruit or drinking grapefruit juice while you use Xanax. If you miss a dose of Xanax and you are using it regularly, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Xanax.

Important safety information: Xanax may cause drowsiness, dizziness, light-headedness, or blurred vision. Do not drive, operate machinery, or do anything else that could be dangerous until you know how you react to Xanax. Using Xanax alone, with certain other medicines, or with alcohol may lessen your ability to drive or to perform other potentially dangerous tasks. Do not drink alcohol while you are using Xanax. Check with your doctor before you use medicines that may cause drowsiness (eg, sleep aids, muscle relaxers) while you are using Xanax; it may add to their effects. Ask your pharmacist if you have questions about which medicines may cause drowsiness. Do not take more than the recommended dose or use for longer than prescribed without checking with your doctor. Smoking may decrease Xanax's effectiveness. Tell your doctor if you smoke or if you have recently stopped smoking. Tell your doctor or dentist that you take Xanax before you receive any medical or dental care, emergency care, or surgery. Use Xanax with caution in the ELDERLY; they may be more sensitive to its effects, especially decreased coordination and drowsiness. Xanax should be used with extreme caution in CHILDREN younger than 18 years old; safety and effectiveness in these children have not been confirmed. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: Xanax may cause harm to the fetus. If you think you may be pregnant, discuss with your doctor the benefits and risks of using Xanax during pregnancy. Xanax is found in breast milk. Do not breast-feed while taking Xanax.

When used for long periods of time or at high doses, Xanax may not work as well and may require higher doses to obtain the same effect as when originally taken. This is known as TOLERANCE. Talk with your doctor if Xanax stops working well. Do not take more than prescribed.

Some people who use Xanax may develop a need to continue taking it. People who take higher doses (eg, some patients with panic disorder) or use Xanax for a long time have a greater risk. This is known as DEPENDENCE or addiction. If you stop taking Xanax suddenly, you may have WITHDRAWAL symptoms. These may include blurred vision; burning, numbness, or tingling; changes in smell or other senses; decreased appetite; decreased awareness of your surroundings; decreased concentration; diarrhea; muscle cramps or twitches; seizures; or weight loss.

Possible side effects of Xanax:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Changes in appetite; constipation; decreased sexual desire or ability; diarrhea; dizziness; drowsiness; dry mouth; light-headedness; nausea; tiredness; weight changes.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue; unusual hoarseness); behavior changes; blurred vision; burning, numbness, or tingling; chest pain; confusion; dark urine; decreased coordination; decreased urination; fainting; fast or irregular heartbeat; hallucinations; loss of balance or muscle control; memory or attention problems; menstrual changes; muscle twitching; new or worsening mental or mood changes (eg, depression, irritability, anxiety; exaggerated feeling of wellbeing); overstimulation; red, swollen blistered, or peeling skin; severe or persistent dizziness, drowsiness, or light-headedness; shortness of breath or trouble breathing; suicidal thoughts or actions; tremor; trouble speaking; yellowing of the eyes or skin.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

See also: Xanax side effects (in more detail)

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center, or emergency room immediately. Symptoms may include confusion; loss of consciousness; loss of coordination; severe drowsiness or deep sleep; slow reflexes.

Proper storage of Xanax:

Store Xanax at room temperature, between 68 and 77 degrees F (20 and 25 degrees C) away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Xanax out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Xanax, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Xanax is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about Xanax. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Xanax resources Xanax Side Effects (in more detail) Xanax Dosage Xanax Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Xanax Drug Interactions Xanax Support Group 262 Reviews for Xanax - Add your own review/rating Xanax Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Xanax Prescribing Information (FDA) Xanax Consumer Overview Alprazolam Prescribing Information (FDA) Alprazolam Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Alprazolam Monograph (AHFS DI) Niravam Prescribing Information (FDA) Xanax XR Prescribing Information (FDA) Xanax XR Consumer Overview Compare Xanax with other medications Anxiety Depression Dysautonomia Panic Disorder Tinnitus
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Alprazolam Solution


Pronunciation: al-PRA-zoe-lam
Generic Name: Alprazolam
Brand Name: Alprazolam Intensol
Alprazolam Solution is used for:

Treating anxiety and panic disorder. It may also be used to treat other conditions as determined by your doctor.

Alprazolam Solution is a benzodiazepine. It works in the brain to decrease anxiety.

Do NOT use Alprazolam Solution if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Alprazolam Solution you have acute narrow-angle glaucoma you are taking delavirdine, itraconazole, ketoconazole, or sodium oxybate (GHB)

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Video: Treatment for Depression

Treatments for depression are getting better everyday and there are things you can start doing right away.

Before using Alprazolam Solution:

Some medical conditions may interact with Alprazolam Solution. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are able to become pregnant if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you have a history of seizures, glaucoma or increased pressure in the eye, kidney or liver problems, lung or breathing problems (eg, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD], sleep apnea), myasthenia gravis, or a blood disorder known as porphyria if you have a history of other mental or mood problems (eg, depression), alcohol or other substance abuse or dependence, or suicidal thoughts or actions if you are in poor health, are very overweight, or are experiencing abnormal muscle movements if you drink alcoholic beverages or you smoke

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Alprazolam Solution. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Methadone because it may increase the risk of serious and sometimes fatal breathing problems Amiodarone, azole antifungals (eg, itraconazole, ketoconazole), cimetidine, cyclosporine, delavirdine, diltiazem, ergot alkaloids (eg, ergotamine), fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, isoniazid, macrolide antibiotics (eg, clarithromycin, erythromycin), nefazodone, nicardipine, nifedipine, omeprazole, oral contraceptives (birth control pills), paroxetine, propoxyphene, protease inhibitors (eg, boceprevir, ritonavir), sodium oxybate (GHB), telithromycin, or valproic acid because they may increase the risk of Alprazolam Solution's side effects Carbamazepine, rifamycins (eg, rifampin), or St. John's wort because they may decrease Alprazolam Solution's effectiveness Hydantoins (eg, phenytoin) because the risk of their side effects may be increased and they may decrease Alprazolam Solution's effectiveness Clozapine or tricyclic antidepressants (eg, desipramine, imipramine) because the risk of their side effects may be increased by Alprazolam Solution

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Alprazolam Solution may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Alprazolam Solution:

Use Alprazolam Solution as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Alprazolam Solution may be taken with or without food. If stomach upset occurs, take with food to reduce stomach irritation. Measure the prescribed dose in the dropper provided with the medicine. Ask your pharmacist for help if you are unsure of how to measure your dose. Drop the dose into a liquid (water, juice, soda) or semisolid food (applesauce, pudding). Stir the liquid or food gently for a few seconds. Immediately drink all of the liquid or eat all of the food containing the medicine. Do not store the mixture for future use. If you are taking Alprazolam Solution regularly, do not suddenly stop taking it without checking with your doctor. You may have an increased risk of side effects (eg, seizures). If you need to stop Alprazolam Solution or add a new medicine, your doctor will gradually lower your dose. Check with your doctor before eating grapefruit or drinking grapefruit juice while you use Alprazolam Solution. If you miss a dose of Alprazolam Solution and you are taking it regularly, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Alprazolam Solution.

Important safety information: Alprazolam Solution may cause drowsiness, dizziness, light-headedness, or blurred vision. Do not drive, operate machinery, or do anything else that could be dangerous until you know how you react to Alprazolam Solution. Using Alprazolam Solution alone, with certain other medicines, or with alcohol may lessen your ability to drive or to perform other potentially dangerous tasks. Do not drink alcohol while you are using Alprazolam Solution. Check with your doctor before you use medicines that may cause drowsiness (eg, sleep aids, muscle relaxers) while you are using Alprazolam Solution; it may add to their effects. Ask your pharmacist if you have questions about which medicines may cause drowsiness. Do NOT take more than the recommended dose or use for longer than prescribed without checking with your doctor. Smoking may decrease Alprazolam Solution's effectiveness. Tell your doctor if you smoke or if you have recently stopped smoking. Tell your doctor or dentist that you take Alprazolam Solution before you receive any medical or dental care, emergency care, or surgery. Use Alprazolam Solution with caution in the ELDERLY; they may be more sensitive to its effects, especially decreased coordination and drowsiness. Alprazolam Solution should be used with extreme caution in CHILDREN younger than 18 years old; safety and effectiveness in these children have not been confirmed. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: Alprazolam Solution may cause harm to the fetus. If you think you may be pregnant, discuss with your doctor the benefits and risks of using Alprazolam Solution during pregnancy. Alprazolam Solution is found in breast milk. Do not breast-feed while taking Alprazolam Solution.

When used for long periods of time or at high doses, Alprazolam Solution may not work as well and may require higher doses to obtain the same effect as when originally taken. This is known as TOLERANCE. Talk with your doctor if Alprazolam Solution stops working well. Do not take more than prescribed.

Some people who use Alprazolam Solution may develop a need to continue taking it. People who take higher doses (eg, some patients with panic disorder) or use Alprazolam Solution for a long time have a greater risk. This is known as DEPENDENCE or addiction. If you stop taking Alprazolam Solution suddenly, you may have WITHDRAWAL symptoms. These may include blurred vision; burning, numbness, or tingling; changes in smell or other senses; decreased appetite; decreased awareness of your surroundings; decreased concentration; diarrhea; muscle cramps or twitches; seizures; or weight loss.

Possible side effects of Alprazolam Solution:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Changes in appetite; constipation; decreased sexual desire or ability; diarrhea; dizziness; drowsiness; dry mouth; light-headedness; nausea; tiredness; weight changes.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue; unusual hoarseness); behavior changes; blurred vision; burning, numbness, or tingling; chest pain; confusion; dark urine; decreased coordination; decreased urination; fainting; fast or irregular heartbeat; hallucinations; loss of balance or muscle control; memory or attention problems; menstrual changes; muscle twitching; new or worsening mental or mood changes (eg, depression, irritability, anxiety; exaggerated feeling of well-being); overstimulation; red, swollen blistered, or peeling skin; severe or persistent dizziness, drowsiness, or light-headedness; shortness of breath or trouble breathing; suicidal thoughts or actions; tremor; trouble speaking; yellowing of the eyes or skin.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

See also: Alprazolam side effects (in more detail)

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center, or emergency room immediately. Symptoms may include clumsiness; confusion; loss of consciousness; severe drowsiness or deep sleep; slow reflexes.

Proper storage of Alprazolam Solution:

Store Alprazolam Solution at room temperature, between 59 and 86 degrees F (15 and 30 degrees C). Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Alprazolam Solution out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Alprazolam Solution, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Alprazolam Solution is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about Alprazolam Solution. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Alprazolam resources Alprazolam Side Effects (in more detail) Alprazolam Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Alprazolam Drug Interactions Alprazolam Support Group 406 Reviews for Alprazolam - Add your own review/rating Compare Alprazolam with other medications Anxiety Depression Dysautonomia Panic Disorder Tinnitus
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Alprazolam Intensol Solution


Pronunciation: al-PRA-zoe-lam
Generic Name: Alprazolam
Brand Name: Alprazolam Intensol
Alprazolam Intensol Solution is used for:

Treating anxiety and panic disorder. It may also be used to treat other conditions as determined by your doctor.

Alprazolam Intensol Solution is a benzodiazepine. It works in the brain to decrease anxiety.

Do NOT use Alprazolam Intensol Solution if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Alprazolam Intensol Solution you have acute narrow-angle glaucoma you are taking delavirdine, itraconazole, ketoconazole, or sodium oxybate (GHB)

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Video: Treatment for Depression

Treatments for depression are getting better everyday and there are things you can start doing right away.

Before using Alprazolam Intensol Solution:

Some medical conditions may interact with Alprazolam Intensol Solution. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are able to become pregnant if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you have a history of seizures, glaucoma or increased pressure in the eye, kidney or liver problems, lung or breathing problems (eg, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD], sleep apnea), myasthenia gravis, or a blood disorder known as porphyria if you have a history of other mental or mood problems (eg, depression), alcohol or other substance abuse or dependence, or suicidal thoughts or actions if you are in poor health, are very overweight, or are experiencing abnormal muscle movements if you drink alcoholic beverages or you smoke

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Alprazolam Intensol Solution. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Methadone because it may increase the risk of serious and sometimes fatal breathing problems Amiodarone, azole antifungals (eg, itraconazole, ketoconazole), cimetidine, cyclosporine, delavirdine, diltiazem, ergot alkaloids (eg, ergotamine), fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, isoniazid, macrolide antibiotics (eg, clarithromycin, erythromycin), nefazodone, nicardipine, nifedipine, omeprazole, oral contraceptives (birth control pills), paroxetine, propoxyphene, protease inhibitors (eg, boceprevir, ritonavir), sodium oxybate (GHB), telithromycin, or valproic acid because they may increase the risk of Alprazolam Intensol Solution's side effects Carbamazepine, rifamycins (eg, rifampin), or St. John's wort because they may decrease Alprazolam Intensol Solution's effectiveness Hydantoins (eg, phenytoin) because the risk of their side effects may be increased and they may decrease Alprazolam Intensol Solution's effectiveness Clozapine or tricyclic antidepressants (eg, desipramine, imipramine) because the risk of their side effects may be increased by Alprazolam Intensol Solution

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Alprazolam Intensol Solution may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Alprazolam Intensol Solution:

Use Alprazolam Intensol Solution as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Alprazolam Intensol Solution may be taken with or without food. If stomach upset occurs, take with food to reduce stomach irritation. Measure the prescribed dose in the dropper provided with the medicine. Ask your pharmacist for help if you are unsure of how to measure your dose. Drop the dose into a liquid (water, juice, soda) or semisolid food (applesauce, pudding). Stir the liquid or food gently for a few seconds. Immediately drink all of the liquid or eat all of the food containing the medicine. Do not store the mixture for future use. If you are taking Alprazolam Intensol Solution regularly, do not suddenly stop taking it without checking with your doctor. You may have an increased risk of side effects (eg, seizures). If you need to stop Alprazolam Intensol Solution or add a new medicine, your doctor will gradually lower your dose. Check with your doctor before eating grapefruit or drinking grapefruit juice while you use Alprazolam Intensol Solution. If you miss a dose of Alprazolam Intensol Solution and you are taking it regularly, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Alprazolam Intensol Solution.

Important safety information: Alprazolam Intensol Solution may cause drowsiness, dizziness, light-headedness, or blurred vision. Do not drive, operate machinery, or do anything else that could be dangerous until you know how you react to Alprazolam Intensol Solution. Using Alprazolam Intensol Solution alone, with certain other medicines, or with alcohol may lessen your ability to drive or to perform other potentially dangerous tasks. Do not drink alcohol while you are using Alprazolam Intensol Solution. Check with your doctor before you use medicines that may cause drowsiness (eg, sleep aids, muscle relaxers) while you are using Alprazolam Intensol Solution; it may add to their effects. Ask your pharmacist if you have questions about which medicines may cause drowsiness. Do NOT take more than the recommended dose or use for longer than prescribed without checking with your doctor. Smoking may decrease Alprazolam Intensol Solution's effectiveness. Tell your doctor if you smoke or if you have recently stopped smoking. Tell your doctor or dentist that you take Alprazolam Intensol Solution before you receive any medical or dental care, emergency care, or surgery. Use Alprazolam Intensol Solution with caution in the ELDERLY; they may be more sensitive to its effects, especially decreased coordination and drowsiness. Alprazolam Intensol Solution should be used with extreme caution in CHILDREN younger than 18 years old; safety and effectiveness in these children have not been confirmed. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: Alprazolam Intensol Solution may cause harm to the fetus. If you think you may be pregnant, discuss with your doctor the benefits and risks of using Alprazolam Intensol Solution during pregnancy. Alprazolam Intensol Solution is found in breast milk. Do not breast-feed while taking Alprazolam Intensol Solution.

When used for long periods of time or at high doses, Alprazolam Intensol Solution may not work as well and may require higher doses to obtain the same effect as when originally taken. This is known as TOLERANCE. Talk with your doctor if Alprazolam Intensol Solution stops working well. Do not take more than prescribed.

Some people who use Alprazolam Intensol Solution may develop a need to continue taking it. People who take higher doses (eg, some patients with panic disorder) or use Alprazolam Intensol Solution for a long time have a greater risk. This is known as DEPENDENCE or addiction. If you stop taking Alprazolam Intensol Solution suddenly, you may have WITHDRAWAL symptoms. These may include blurred vision; burning, numbness, or tingling; changes in smell or other senses; decreased appetite; decreased awareness of your surroundings; decreased concentration; diarrhea; muscle cramps or twitches; seizures; or weight loss.

Possible side effects of Alprazolam Intensol Solution:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Changes in appetite; constipation; decreased sexual desire or ability; diarrhea; dizziness; drowsiness; dry mouth; light-headedness; nausea; tiredness; weight changes.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue; unusual hoarseness); behavior changes; blurred vision; burning, numbness, or tingling; chest pain; confusion; dark urine; decreased coordination; decreased urination; fainting; fast or irregular heartbeat; hallucinations; loss of balance or muscle control; memory or attention problems; menstrual changes; muscle twitching; new or worsening mental or mood changes (eg, depression, irritability, anxiety; exaggerated feeling of well-being); overstimulation; red, swollen blistered, or peeling skin; severe or persistent dizziness, drowsiness, or light-headedness; shortness of breath or trouble breathing; suicidal thoughts or actions; tremor; trouble speaking; yellowing of the eyes or skin.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

See also: Alprazolam Intensol side effects (in more detail)

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center, or emergency room immediately. Symptoms may include clumsiness; confusion; loss of consciousness; severe drowsiness or deep sleep; slow reflexes.

Proper storage of Alprazolam Intensol Solution:

Store Alprazolam Intensol Solution at room temperature, between 59 and 86 degrees F (15 and 30 degrees C). Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Alprazolam Intensol Solution out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Alprazolam Intensol Solution, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Alprazolam Intensol Solution is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about Alprazolam Intensol Solution. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Alprazolam Intensol resources Alprazolam Intensol Side Effects (in more detail) Alprazolam Intensol Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Alprazolam Intensol Drug Interactions Alprazolam Intensol Support Group 0 Reviews for Alprazolam Intensol - Add your own review/rating Compare Alprazolam Intensol with other medications Anxiety Depression Dysautonomia Panic Disorder Tinnitus
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Marplan


Generic Name: isocarboxazid (eye so kar BOX a zid)
Brand Names: Marplan

What is Marplan (isocarboxazid)?

Isocarboxazid is a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) that works by increasing the levels of certain chemicals in the brain.

Isocarboxazid is used to treat symptoms of depression that may include anxiety, panic, or phobias. This medication is usually given after other antidepressants have been tried without successful treatment of symptoms.

Isocarboxazid may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Marplan (isocarboxazid)?

There are many other medicines that can cause serious or life-threatening medical problems if you take them together with isocarboxazid. Do not take isocarboxazid before telling your doctor about all other prescription and over-the-counter medications you use, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products. Keep a list with you of all the medicines you use and show this list to any doctor, dentist, or other healthcare provider who treats you.

You may have thoughts about suicide when you first start taking an antidepressant, especially if you are younger than 24 years old. Your doctor will need to check you at regular visits for at least the first 12 weeks of treatment.

Video: Treatment for Depression

Treatments for depression are getting better everyday and there are things you can start doing right away.

Call your doctor at once if you have any new or worsening symptoms such as: mood or behavior changes, anxiety, panic attacks, trouble sleeping, or if you feel impulsive, irritable, agitated, hostile, aggressive, restless, hyperactive (mentally or physically), more depressed, or have thoughts about suicide or hurting yourself. While you are taking isocarboxazid, you must not drink alcohol or eat foods that are high in tyramine, listed in the "What should I avoid while taking isocarboxazid?" section of this leaflet. Eating tyramine while you are taking isocarboxazid can raise your blood pressure to dangerous levels, causing symptoms that include sudden and severe headache, rapid heartbeat, stiffness in your neck, nausea, vomiting, cold sweat, vision problems, and sensitivity to light. Stop taking isocarboxazid and call your doctor at once if you have any of these symptoms. Isocarboxazid can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert. What should I discuss with my doctor before taking Marplan (isocarboxazid)? Do not use this medication if you have used another MAOI such as phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days. Serious, life-threatening side effects can occur if you take isocarboxazid before another MAOI has cleared from your body. Do not take this medication if you are allergic to isocarboxazid, or if you have:

pheochromocytoma (tumor of the adrenal gland);

a history of stroke or blood clots;

liver disease;

kidney disease;

heart disease;

high blood pressure; or

a history of severe or frequent headaches.

There are many other medicines that can cause serious or life-threatening medical problems if you take them together with isocarboxazid. The following drugs should not be used while you are taking isocarboxazid:

diet pills, caffeine, stimulants, ADHD medication, asthma medication, over-the-counter cough and cold or allergy medicines;

blood pressure medication;

diuretics (water pills);

bupropion (Wellbutrin, Zyban);

buspirone (BuSpar);

carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol);

furazolidone (Furoxone);

meperidine (Demerol, Mepergan);

pargyline (Eutonyl);

procarbazine (Matulane);

alcohol or medicines that make you sleepy (such as cold medicine, pain medication, muscle relaxers, and medicine for seizures, depression or anxiety).

antidepressants such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Etrafon), amoxapine (Ascendin), clomipramine (Anafranil), desipramine (Norpramin), doxepin (Adepin, Sinequan), imipramine (Janimine, Tofranil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), protriptyline (Vivactil), or trimipramine (Surmontil); or

antidepressants such as citalopram (Celexa), escitalopram (Lexapro), fluoxetine (Prozac, Sarafem), fluvoxamine (Luvox), paroxetine (Paxil), or sertraline (Zoloft).

If you have any of these other conditions, you may need an isocarboxazid dose adjustment or special tests:

high blood pressure;

diabetes;

a thyroid disorder;

schizophrenia;

epilepsy or other seizure disorder;

if you have taken another antidepressant within the past 5 weeks; or

if you are also taking tryptophan (L-tryptophan), guanethidine (Ismelin), levodopa (Larodopa, Parcopa, Sinemet), or methyldopa (Aldomet).

You may have thoughts about suicide when you first start taking an antidepressant, especially if you are younger than 24 years old. Tell your doctor if you have worsening symptoms of depression or suicidal thoughts during the first several weeks of treatment, or whenever your dose is changed.

Your family or other caregivers should also be alert to changes in your mood or symptoms. Your doctor will need to check you at regular visits for at least the first 12 weeks of treatment.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether isocarboxazid will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication. It is not known whether isocarboxazid passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. Do not give isocarboxazid to anyone younger than 16 years old without the advice of a doctor. How should I take Marplan (isocarboxazid)?

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results.

Your blood pressure will need to be tested often. Visit your doctor regularly.

Take this medication for the entire length of time prescribed by your doctor. It may take up to 6 weeks or longer before you notice improvement in your symptoms. Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

See also: Marplan dosage (in more detail)

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. Overdose symptoms may include shallow breathing, fast heart rate, sweating, fever, slow reflexes, feeling light-headed, fainting, or seizure (convulsions). What should I avoid while taking Marplan (isocarboxazid)? While you are taking isocarboxazid you must not eat foods that are high in tyramine, including:

cheese (especially strong or aged cheeses);

sour cream and yogurt;

beer (including non-alcoholic beer), sherry, Chianti wine, liquers;

dry sausage (such as hard salami, pepperoni), anchovies, caviar, liver, pickled herring;

canned figs, raisins, bananas;

avocados;

chocolate or caffeine;

soy sauce;

sauerkraut;

fava beans;

yeast extracts;

meat extracts;

meat prepared with tenderizer; or

over-the-counter supplements or cough and cold medicines that contain dextromethorphan or tyramine.

You should become very familiar with the list of foods and medicines you must avoid while you are taking isocarboxazid. Eating tyramine while you are taking isocarboxazid can raise your blood pressure to dangerous levels which could cause life-threatening side effects.

Isocarboxazid may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert. Marplan (isocarboxazid) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have any new or worsening symptoms such as: mood or behavior changes, anxiety, panic attacks, trouble sleeping, or if you feel impulsive, irritable, agitated, hostile, aggressive, restless, hyperactive (mentally or physically), more depressed, or have thoughts about suicide or hurting yourself.

Stop using isocarboxazid and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

sudden and severe headache, rapid heartbeat, stiffness in your neck, nausea, vomiting, cold sweat, sweating, vision problems, sensitivity to light;

chest pain, fast or slow heart rate;

swelling, rapid weight gain;

jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); or

feeling light-headed, fainting.

Less serious side effects may include:

dizziness, headache;

tremors or shaking;

constipation, nausea; or

dry mouth.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Marplan (isocarboxazid)?

There are many other medicines that can cause serious or life-threatening medical problems if you take them together with isocarboxazid. Do not take isocarboxazid before telling your doctor about all other prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list with you of all the medicines you use and show this list to any doctor, dentist, or other healthcare provider who treats you.

More Marplan resources Marplan Side Effects (in more detail) Marplan Dosage Marplan Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Marplan Drug Interactions Marplan Support Group 2 Reviews for Marplan - Add your own review/rating Marplan Prescribing Information (FDA) Marplan Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Marplan MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Isocarboxazid Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Compare Marplan with other medications Depression Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about isocarboxzazid.

See also: Marplan side effects (in more detail)


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nefazodone


Generic Name: nefazodone (ne FAZ oh done)
Brand names: Serzone

What is nefazodone?

Nefazodone is an antidepressant. It is used to treat depression, including major depressive disorder.

Nefazodone is not chemically similar to other groups of antidepressants, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or "SSRIs", tricyclic antidepressants, or monoamine oxidase inhibitors or "MAOIs."

Nefazodone may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about nefazodone? Do not take nefazodone together with carbamazepine (Tegretol), cisapride (Propulsid), pimozide (Orap), or an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), tranylcypromine (Parnate), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), or selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam). There are many other medicines that can interact with nefazodone. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list with you of all the medicines you use and show this list to any doctor or other healthcare provider who treats you.

You may have thoughts about suicide when you first start taking an antidepressant, especially if you are younger than 24 years old. Your doctor will need to check you at regular visits for at least the first 12 weeks of treatment.

Video: Treatment for Depression

Treatments for depression are getting better everyday and there are things you can start doing right away.

Call your doctor at once if you have any new or worsening symptoms such as: mood or behavior changes, anxiety, panic attacks, trouble sleeping, or if you feel impulsive, irritable, agitated, hostile, aggressive, restless, hyperactive (mentally or physically), more depressed, or have thoughts about suicide or hurting yourself. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking nefazodone? You should not take this medication if you are allergic to nefazodone or trazodone (Desyrel), or if you have ever had liver problems caused by taking nefazodone.

Do not take nefazodone if you are using any of the following drugs:

carbamazepine (Tegretol);

cisapride (Propulsid);

pimozide (Orap); or

an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), tranylcypromine (Parnate), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), or selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam).

Serious and sometimes fatal reactions can occur when these medicines are taken with nefazodone. You must wait at least 14 days after stopping an MAO inhibitor before you can take nefazodone. You must wait 7 days after stopping nefazodone before you can take an MAOI.

If you have any of these other conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely take nefazodone:

liver disease (especially cirrhosis);

heart disease or recent heart attack;

bipolar disorder (manic depression);

epilepsy or other seizure disorder; or

a history of suicidal thoughts or actions.

You may have thoughts about suicide while taking an antidepressant, especially if you are younger than 24 years old. Tell your doctor if you have worsening depression or suicidal thoughts during the first several weeks of treatment, or whenever your dose is changed.

Your family or other caregivers should also be alert to changes in your mood or symptoms. Your doctor will need to check you at regular visits for at least the first 12 weeks of treatment.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether nefazodone is harmful to an unborn baby. Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether nefazodone passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take nefazodone?

Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results from the medication.

You may take nefazodone with or without food.

If you need to have any type of surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are taking nefazodone. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time. It may take several weeks of using this medicine before your symptoms improve. For best results, keep using the medication as directed. Store nefazodone at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

See also: Nefazodone dosage (in more detail)

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for the next regularly scheduled dose, skip the missed dose and take the next one as directed. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have taken too much of this medication. Overdose symptoms may include nausea, vomiting, extreme drowsiness, or seizure (convulsions). What should I avoid while taking nefazodone? Avoid drinking alcohol while you are taking nefazodone. Nefazodone can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert.

Avoid getting up too fast from a sitting or lying position, or you may feel dizzy. Get up slowly and steady yourself to prevent a fall.

Nefazodone side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: skin rash or hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have any new or worsening symptoms such as: mood or behavior changes, anxiety, panic attacks, trouble sleeping, or if you feel impulsive, irritable, agitated, hostile, aggressive, restless, hyperactive (mentally or physically), more depressed, or have thoughts about suicide or hurting yourself.

Stop taking nefazodone and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

nausea, stomach pain, loss of appetite, itching, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);

confusion, hallucinations, unusual thoughts or behavior;

seizure (convulsions);

penis erection that is painful or lasts 4 hours or longer;

fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms; or

feeling like you might pass out.

Less serious side effects may include:

mild nausea, diarrhea, constipation;

dizziness, drowsiness, weakness;

sleep problems (insomnia);

dry mouth, sore throat;

vision problems;

headache; or

increased appetite.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Nefazodone Dosing Information

Usual Adult Dose for Depression:

Nefazodone sold under the trade name of Serzone was voluntarily withdrawn from the U.S. market in June 2004. The manufacturer blamed a decline in sales as the reason for the withdrawal of the drug. However, some feel the withdrawal of this drug may have actually been because nefazodone has been linked to dozens of cases of liver failure and injury, including at least 20 deaths. Canadian regulators had banned the drug in the fall of 2003 because of the liver risk associated with it. Serzone has also been pulled off the market in many other countries and the manufacturer had been under mounting pressure from lawsuits in the U.S. However, generic versions of nefazodone are still available in the U.S.
Initial dose: 100 mg orally twice a day.
Maintenance dose: 150 to 300 mg orally twice a day. The dose may be increased in 100 to 200 mg increments at intervals of no less than 1 week.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Depression:

Nefazodone sold under the trade name of Serzone was voluntarily withdrawn from the U.S. market in June 2004. The manufacturer blamed a decline in sales as the reason for the withdrawal of the drug. However, some feel the withdrawal of this drug may have actually been because nefazodone has been linked to dozens of cases of liver failure and injury, including at least 20 deaths. Canadian regulators had banned the drug in the fall of 2003 because of the liver risk associated with it. Serzone has also been pulled off the market in many other countries and the manufacturer had been under mounting pressure from lawsuits in the U.S. However, generic versions of nefazodone are still available in the U.S.
7 to 12 years:
Initial dose: 50 mg orally twice a day (investigational).
Maintenance dose: 100 to 150 mg orally twice a day. The dose may be increased in 50 mg increments at intervals of no less than 1 week.
12 to 18 years:
Initial dose: 50 mg orally twice a day (investigational).
Maintenance dose: 100 to 300 mg orally twice a day. The dose may be increased in 50 to 100 mg increments at intervals of no less than 1 week.

What other drugs will affect nefazodone? Cold or allergy medicine, narcotic pain medicine, sleeping pills, muscle relaxers, and medicine for seizures or anxiety may add to the side effects of nefazodone. Tell your doctor if you regularly use any of these medicines, or any other antidepressants.

Tell your doctor about all other medications you use, especially:

buspirone (BuSpar);

cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune, Gengraf);

digoxin (digitalis, Lanoxin);

haloperidol (Haldol);

phenytoin (Dilantin);

propranolol (Inderal);

tacrolimus (Prograf);

triazolam (Halcion);

a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin);

cholesterol-lowering medicines such as atorvastatin (Lipitor), simvastatin (Zocor), or lovastatin (Mevacor); or

any other antidepressant such as desipramine (Norpramin) or fluoxetine (Prozac).

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with nefazodone. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

More nefazodone resources Nefazodone Side Effects (in more detail) Nefazodone Dosage Nefazodone Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Nefazodone Drug Interactions Nefazodone Support Group 16 Reviews for Nefazodone - Add your own review/rating nefazodone Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Nefazodone Prescribing Information (FDA) Nefazodone MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Nefazodone Hydrochloride Monograph (AHFS DI) Serzone Prescribing Information (FDA) Serzone Consumer Overview Compare nefazodone with other medications Anxiety Depression Panic Disorder Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about nefazodone.

See also: nefazodone side effects (in more detail)


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