meprobamate


Generic Name: meprobamate (meh pro BA mate)
Brand names: Equanil, Miltown, MB-TAB

What is meprobamate?

Meprobamate affects chemicals in your brain that may become unbalanced and cause anxiety.

Meprobamate is used to relieve anxiety, nervousness, and tension associated with anxiety disorders.

Meprobamate may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about meprobamate? Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Meprobamate may cause drowsiness, dizziness, and blurred vision. If you experience drowsiness, dizziness, or blurred vision, avoid these activities. Use alcohol cautiously. Alcohol may increase drowsiness and dizziness while you are taking meprobamate. Do not stop taking meprobamate suddenly if you have been taking it for several weeks. Stopping suddenly may cause withdrawal symptoms and make you uncomfortable. Talk to your doctor if you need to stop treatment with meprobamate. Notify your doctor if you develop a fever, a skin rash, or a sore throat. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking meprobamate?

Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you have

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porphyria,

kidney disease, liver disease,

epilepsy or another seizure disorder, or

a history of drug or alcohol abuse.

You may not be able to take meprobamate, or you may require a lower dose or special monitoring during treatment if you have any of the conditions listed above.

Meprobamate may harm an unborn baby. Do not take this medication without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant. Meprobamate passes into breast milk. Do not take meprobamate without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. If you are over 60 years of age, you may be more likely to experience side effects from meprobamate. You may require a lower dose of this medication or special monitoring during treatment. Meprobamate is not approved for use by children younger than 6 years of age. How should I take meprobamate?

Take meprobamate exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these instructions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you.

Take each dose with a full glass of water. Do not crush, chew, or open any of the tablets or capsules. Swallow them whole.

Do not take more of this medication than is prescribed for you.

Do not stop taking meprobamate suddenly if you have been taking it for several weeks. Stopping suddenly may cause withdrawal symptoms and make you uncomfortable. Talk to your doctor if you need to stop treatment with meprobamate. Store meprobamate at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the dose you missed and take only your next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose of this medication. A double dose could be very dangerous.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention.

Symptoms of a meprobamate overdose include sleepiness, dizziness, confusion, a slow heartbeat, difficulty breathing, difficulty walking and talking, an appearance of being drunk, and unconsciousness.

What should I avoid while taking meprobamate? Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Meprobamate may cause drowsiness, dizziness, and blurred vision. If you experience drowsiness, dizziness, or blurred vision, avoid these activities. Use alcohol cautiously. Alcohol may increase drowsiness and dizziness while you are taking meprobamate.

Avoid other sedatives, sleeping pills, and tranquilizers. They should not be used while you are taking meprobamate unless your doctor approves.

Meprobamate side effects If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking meprobamate and seek emergency medical attention:

an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, face, or tongue; or hives);

fast or irregular heartbeats;

abnormal behavior;

fever;

a skin rash; or

a sore throat.

Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take meprobamate and talk to your doctor if you experience

drowsiness or dizziness,

headache,

weakness,

vomiting or diarrhea, or

numbness or tingling.

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect meprobamate?

Meprobamate may increase the effects of other drugs that cause drowsiness, including antidepressants, alcohol, antihistamines, sedatives (used to treat insomnia), pain relievers, other anxiety medicines, and muscle relaxants. Tell your doctor about all medicines that you are taking, and do not take any medicine unless your doctor approves.

Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with meprobamate. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines.

More meprobamate resources Meprobamate Side Effects (in more detail) Meprobamate Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Meprobamate Drug Interactions Meprobamate Support Group 2 Reviews for Meprobamate - Add your own review/rating meprobamate Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Meprobamate Prescribing Information (FDA) Meprobamate Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Meprobamate Monograph (AHFS DI) Meprobamate MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Compare meprobamate with other medications Anxiety Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has additional information about meprobamate written for health professionals that you may read.

See also: meprobamate side effects (in more detail)


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Equanil


Generic Name: meprobamate (meh pro BA mate)
Brand Names: Equanil, Miltown

What is Equanil (meprobamate)?

Meprobamate affects chemicals in your brain that may become unbalanced and cause anxiety.

Meprobamate is used to relieve anxiety, nervousness, and tension associated with anxiety disorders.

Meprobamate may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Equanil (meprobamate)? Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Meprobamate may cause drowsiness, dizziness, and blurred vision. If you experience drowsiness, dizziness, or blurred vision, avoid these activities. Use alcohol cautiously. Alcohol may increase drowsiness and dizziness while you are taking meprobamate. Do not stop taking meprobamate suddenly if you have been taking it for several weeks. Stopping suddenly may cause withdrawal symptoms and make you uncomfortable. Talk to your doctor if you need to stop treatment with meprobamate. Notify your doctor if you develop a fever, a skin rash, or a sore throat. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Equanil (meprobamate)?

Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you have

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Treatments for depression are getting better everyday and there are things you can start doing right away.

porphyria,

kidney disease, liver disease,

epilepsy or another seizure disorder, or

a history of drug or alcohol abuse.

You may not be able to take meprobamate, or you may require a lower dose or special monitoring during treatment if you have any of the conditions listed above.

Meprobamate may harm an unborn baby. Do not take this medication without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant. Meprobamate passes into breast milk. Do not take meprobamate without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. If you are over 60 years of age, you may be more likely to experience side effects from meprobamate. You may require a lower dose of this medication or special monitoring during treatment. Meprobamate is not approved for use by children younger than 6 years of age. How should I take Equanil (meprobamate)?

Take meprobamate exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these instructions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you.

Take each dose with a full glass of water. Do not crush, chew, or open any of the tablets or capsules. Swallow them whole.

Do not take more of this medication than is prescribed for you.

Do not stop taking meprobamate suddenly if you have been taking it for several weeks. Stopping suddenly may cause withdrawal symptoms and make you uncomfortable. Talk to your doctor if you need to stop treatment with meprobamate. Store meprobamate at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the dose you missed and take only your next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose of this medication. A double dose could be very dangerous.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention.

Symptoms of a meprobamate overdose include sleepiness, dizziness, confusion, a slow heartbeat, difficulty breathing, difficulty walking and talking, an appearance of being drunk, and unconsciousness.

What should I avoid while taking Equanil (meprobamate)? Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Meprobamate may cause drowsiness, dizziness, and blurred vision. If you experience drowsiness, dizziness, or blurred vision, avoid these activities. Use alcohol cautiously. Alcohol may increase drowsiness and dizziness while you are taking meprobamate.

Avoid other sedatives, sleeping pills, and tranquilizers. They should not be used while you are taking meprobamate unless your doctor approves.

Equanil (meprobamate) side effects If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking meprobamate and seek emergency medical attention:

an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, face, or tongue; or hives);

fast or irregular heartbeats;

abnormal behavior;

fever;

a skin rash; or

a sore throat.

Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take meprobamate and talk to your doctor if you experience

drowsiness or dizziness,

headache,

weakness,

vomiting or diarrhea, or

numbness or tingling.

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Equanil (meprobamate)?

Meprobamate may increase the effects of other drugs that cause drowsiness, including antidepressants, alcohol, antihistamines, sedatives (used to treat insomnia), pain relievers, other anxiety medicines, and muscle relaxants. Tell your doctor about all medicines that you are taking, and do not take any medicine unless your doctor approves.

Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with meprobamate. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines.

More Equanil resources Equanil Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Equanil Drug Interactions Equanil Support Group 0 Reviews for Equanil - Add your own review/rating Meprobamate Prescribing Information (FDA) Meprobamate Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Meprobamate Monograph (AHFS DI) Meprobamate MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Mb-Tab Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Compare Equanil with other medications Anxiety Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has additional information about meprobamate written for health professionals that you may read.
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Sterile Potassium Chloride Concentrate 15% (hameln)


Read all of this leaflet carefully before you start taking this medicine. Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again. If you have further questions, please ask your doctor or your pharmacist. This medicine has been prescribed for you personally and you should not pass it on to others. It may harm them, even if their symptoms are the same as yours. In this leaflet: 1. What your medicine is and what it is used for 2. Before you receive it 3. How it is administered 4. Possible side effects 5. Storing your injection 6. Use by date Sterile Potassium Chloride Concentrate 15%

Each ml contains 0.15 g potassium chloride in a sterile solution for injection. The other ingredients are hydrochloric acid and water for injections.

Holder of the Marketing Authorisation: hameln pharmaceuticals ltd Gloucester United Kingdom Manufacturer: hameln Pharmaceuticals gmbh Langes Feld 13 31789 Hameln Germany What potassium chloride is and what it is used for

Potassium chloride occurs naturally in your body.

It is used to replace the loss of potassium from your body, if this cannot be achieved when given by mouth or in the diet.

The injection is supplied in clear glass ampoules containing 10 ml.

10 ampoules are supplied in each carton.

Before the injection is given to you

Please tell your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before being given the injection if you:

suffer from impaired kidney function suffer from Addison's disease (a disease characterised by a reduced secretion of hormones from a gland situated near the kidneys) are very dehydrated suffer from heat cramps suffer from disturbances in the salt content of your blood are pregnant or breast-feeding

Please inform your doctor, nurse or pharmacist if you are taking or have recently taken any other medicines, even those not prescribed, especially diuretics (water tablets) as these may interfere with this injection.

How the injection is given to you

Your doctor, nurse or pharmacist will give you the injection.

Sterile Potassium Chloride Concentrate 15% may be given by an intravenous injection (into a vein).

In emergencies, it may be necessary to give the injection without your knowledge.

Your doctor will decide on the correct dosage for you and when or how the injection will be given.

The injection must be diluted at least 50 times before it is given to you.

Possible side effects

Like all medicines, potassium chloride can have side effects.

Potassium chloride may cause the following side effects:

pain at the site of injection inflammation of the vein into which the solution is being injected raised blood levels of potassium

If you experience these or any other side effects not mentioned in this leaflet, please inform your doctor, nurse or pharmacist

Storing your injection

Your injection will be stored under 25°C, protected from light and out of the reach and sight of children.

Use by date

The doctor, nurse or pharmacist will check that the injection is not past its expiry date before giving you the injection.

This leaflet was last updated on March 25th 2004.

PL01502/0007R

43856/19/04


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Dobutamine Concentrate 250 mg / 20 ml.


Dobutamine Concentrate

Important information about your medicine Your doctor or nurse will give you the injection If this injection causes you any problems talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist Please tell your doctor or pharmacist, if you have any other medical conditions or have an allergy to any of the ingredients of this medicine Please tell your doctor or pharmacist, if you are taking any other medicines Read all of this leaflet carefully before you start using this medicine. In some circumstances this may not be possible and this leaflet will be kept in a safe place should you wish to read it. Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again If you have any further questions, please ask your doctor or your pharmacist. This medicine has been prescribed for you personally and you should not pass it on to others. It may harm them, even if their symptoms are the same as yours. Where to find information in this leaflet 1. What Dobutamine Concentrate is and what it is used for 2. Before you are given Dobutamine Concentrate 3. How to use Dobutamine Concentrate 4. Possible side effects 5. Storing Dobutamine Concentrate 6. Further information What Dobutamine Concentrate is and what it is used for

Dobutamine Concentrate belongs to a group of medicines known as inotropes, which make your heart beat more strongly. It is used:

in open heart surgery to treat heart disease to treat heart failure in shock as an alternative to exercise for stress testing the heart. Before you are given Dobutamine Concentrate You should NOT be given Dobutamine Concentrate if you: Are sensitive or allergic to Dobutamine Concentrate, sodium metabisulphite or any of the other ingredients in this injection. suffer from high blood pressure due to a tumour near the kidney (Phaeocromocytoma). Please tell your doctor or nurse before being given the injection if you: have recently had a heart attack are asthmatic have unstable angina have heart disease have high blood pressure have any condition that would make exercise dangerous for you. Using other medicines:

Please tell your doctor or nurse if you are taking or have recently taken any other medicines, including medicines obtained without a prescription. This is especially important with the following medicines as they may interact with your Dobutamine Concentrate:

beta blockers (medicines used to relieve certain heart conditions, anxiety and migraine). anaesthetics. entacapone (a medicine to treat Parkinson’s Disease). Pregnancy or breast feeding:

Please tell your doctor or nurse before being given this injection if you are pregnant or breast feeding. The doctor will then decide if the injection is suitable for you.

Driving and using machines:

You should not drive or use machinery if you are affected by the administration of Dobutamine Concentrate.

How to use Dobutamine Concentrate

Your nurse or doctor will give you the injection.

Your doctor will decide the correct dosage for you and how and when the injection will be given. Dobutamine Concentrate is not normally given to children.

Since the injection will be given to you by a doctor or nurse, it is unlikely that you will be given too much. If you think you have been given too much, feel sick, are sick, feel anxious, feel palpitations, have a headache, feel short of breath or have chest pain you must tell the person giving you the injection.

Possible side effects

Like all medicines, Dobutamine Concentrate can cause side effects, although not everybody gets them.

Intravenous infusions may cause inflammation of the vein and damage to the skin at the injection site. The surrounding skin may feel warm and tender and redness may be present.

Death due to rupture of the heart muscle has occurred very rarely after giving dobutamine to assess the response of the heart to stress in patients with a recent heart attack. Your doctor will examine your heart before giving you Dobutamine Concentrate to decide if you are suitable to receive the drug.

The following side-effects have been reported: Hypersensitivity reactions involving rash and difficulty breathing including life threatening asthmatic episodes Changes in the levels of certain chemicals in the blood. Increased heart rate, palpitations, chest pain and changes to the rhythm of your heart. Changes to your blood pressure including both an increase and a decrease. difficulty in breathing (your breathing may stop) asthma headache nausea (feeling sick) Sudden, involuntary twitching of a muscle or group of muscles.

If you think this injection is causing you any problems, or you are at all worried, talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Storing Dobutamine Concentrate

Your injection will be stored at less than 21°C and protected from light. The nurse or doctor will check that the injection is not past its expiry date before giving you the injection.

Further information What Dobutamine Concentrate contains:

This injection contains the active ingredient dobutamine hydrochloride. Each 1 ml contains dobutamine hydrochloride equivalent to 12.5 mg dobutamine in a sterile solution for injection.

This injection contains the following inactive ingredients: sodium metabisulphite, sodium hydroxide, hydrochloric acid, sterile water for injections and carbon dioxide.

What Dobutamine Concentrate looks like and contents of the pack:

Dobutamine Concentrate is supplied in 20 ml clear glass ampoules, in cartons containing one, five or ten ampoules. Not all sizes may be marketed.

The marketing authorisation number of this medicine is: PL 01502/0054

Marketing Authorisation Holder: hameln pharmaceuticals ltd Gloucester United Kingdom Manufacturer: hameln pharmaceuticals gmbh Langes Feld 13 31789 Hameln Germany

For any information about this medicine, please contact the Marketing Authorisation Holder

This leaflet was last approved 12.08.2008

43821/20/09


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Atropine Sulphate Injection 600mcg in 1ml


Atropine Sulphate Injection

Important information about your medicine Your doctor or nurse will give you the injection. If this injection causes you any problems talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist. Please tell your doctor or pharmacist, if you have any other medical conditions or have an allergy to any of the ingredients of this medicine. Please tell your doctor or pharmacist, if you are taking any other medicines. Read all of this leaflet carefully before you start using this medicine. In some circumstances this may not be possible and this leaflet will be kept in a safe place should you wish to read it. Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again. If you have any further questions, please ask your doctor or your pharmacist. This medicine has been prescribed for you personally and you should not pass it on to others. It may harm them, even if their symptoms are the same as yours. Where to find information in this leaflet 1. What Atropine Sulphate Injection is and what it is used for 2. Before you are given Atropine Sulphate Injection 3. How to use Atropine Sulphate Injection 4. Possible side effects 5. Storing Atropine Sulphate Injection 6. Further information What Atropine Sulphate Injection is and what it is used for

Atropine Sulphate Injection belongs to a group of medicines known as anticholinergics.

It is used: before general anaesthesia to reduce saliva secretions. to restore normal heartbeat during a cardiac arrest. as an antidote to some insecticides and in mushroom poisoning. in combination with other drugs to reverse the effect of muscle relaxants used during surgery. Before you are given Atropine Sulphate Injection You should NOT be given Atropine Sulphate Injection if you: are sensitive or allergic to Atropine Sulphate Injection or any of the other ingredients in this injection. suffer from closed-angle glaucoma (a condition that affects your eyes). are a man with an enlarged prostate. suffer from myasthenia gravis (weakness of breathing muscles). suffer from pyloric stenosis (a narrowing of the opening that takes food away from your stomach). suffer from paralytic lleus (your intestine stops functioning properly). suffer from ulcerative colitis - a disease of the colon and rectum. Please tell your doctor or nurse before being given the injection if you have: urinary difficulties heart failure had a heart attack had a heart transplant chronic pulmonary obstructive disease (a condition where the airflow to your lungs is restricted and you may cough and feel breathless) an overactive thyroid high blood pressure fever diarrhoea reflux oesophagitis (heartburn) Using other medicines:

Please tell your doctor or nurse if you are taking or have recently taken any other medicines, including medicines obtained without a prescription. This is especially important with the following medicines as they may interact with your Atropine Sulphate Injection:

medicines to treat psychosis or depression. amantadine (a medicine for Parkinson's Disease) antihistamines (medicines used to treat hayfever and allergies medicines to regulate your heart (disopyramide and mexiletine) ketoconazole (a medicine to treat fungal infections). Medicines that you take by allowing them to dissolve slowly in your mouth - atropine may cause your mouth to become dry, making it more difficult for these medicines to dissolve. Pregnancy or breast feeding:

Please tell your doctor or nurse before being given this injection if you are pregnant or breast feeding. The doctor will then decide if the injection is suitable for you.

Driving and using machines:

You should not drive or use machinery if you are affected by the administration of Atropine Sulphate Injection.

How to use Atropine Sulphate Injection

Your nurse or doctor will give you the injection

Your doctor will decide the correct dosage for you and how and when the injection will be given.

Since the injection will be given to you by a doctor or nurse, it is unlikely that you will be given too much. If you think you have been given too much, you feel your heart beating very fast, you are breathing quickly, have a high temperature, feel restless, confused, have hallucinations, or lose co-ordination you must tell the person giving you the injection.

Possible side effects

Like all medicines, Atropine Sulphate Injection can cause side effects, although not everybody gets them.

drowsiness blurred vision dry mouth with difficulty swallowing thirst dilation of the pupils flushing dryness of the skin slow heart beat followed by fast heart beat palpitations (you are aware of your heart beating) difficulty in passing urine or constipation vomiting rashes confusion

If you think this injection is causing you any problems, or you are at all worried, talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Storing Atropine Sulphate Injection

Your injection will be stored at less than 25°C and protected from light. The nurse or doctor will check that the injection is not past its expiry date before giving you the injection.

Further information What Atropine Sulphate Injection contains:

This injection contains the active ingredient atropine sulphate. Each 1 ml of solution contains 600 micrograms in a sterile solution for injection.

This injection contains the following Inactive Ingredients: sulphuric acid and water for injections.

What Atropine Sulphate Injection looks like and contents of the pack:

Atropine Sulphate Injection is a supplied in 1 ml clear glass ampoules. 10 ampoules are supplied in each carton.

The marketing authorisation number of this medicine is: PL 01502/0016R

Marketing Authorisation Holder: hameln pharmaceuticals ltd Gloucester United Kingdom Manufacturer hameln pharmaceuticals gmbh Langes Feld 13 31789 Hameln Germany

For any information about this medicine, please contact the Marketing Authorisation Holder

This leaflet was last approved 2008-08-18

44171/42/08


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Adrenaline (Epinephrine) Injection BP 1 in 1000


Adrenaline (epinephrine) 1 in 1000 Injection

Important information about your medicine Your doctor or nurse will give you the injection. If this injection causes you any problems talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist. Please tell your doctor or pharmacist, if you have any other medical conditions or have an allergy to any of the ingredients of this medicine. Please tell your doctor or pharmacist, if you are taking any other medicines. Read all of this leaflet carefully before you start using this medicine. In some circumstances this may not be possible and this leaflet will be kept in a safe place should you wish to read it. Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again If you have any further questions, please ask your doctor or your pharmacist. This medicine has been prescribed for you personally and you should not pass it on to others. It may harm them, even if their symptoms are the same as yours. Where to find information in this leaflet 1. What Adrenaline (epinephrine) 1 in 1000 Injection is and what it is used for 2. Before you are given Adrenaline (epinephrine) 1 in 1000 Injection 3. How to use Adrenaline (epinephrine) 1 in 1000 Injection 4. Possible side effects 5. Storing Adrenaline (epinephrine) 1 in 1000 Injection 6. Further information What Adrenaline (epinephrine) 1 in 1000 Injection is and what it is used for

Adrenaline is used in life-threatening emergencies such as acute allergic reactions.

It is an active chemical produced in the body. Adrenaline acts on receptors in the body and can increase the speed and force of heart muscle contractions, relieve narrowing of the lungs passages helping breathing and relieve some of the symptoms of acute allergic reaction.

Before you are given Adrenaline (epinephrine) 1 in 1000 Injection You should NOT be given Adrenaline (epinephrine) 1 in 1000 Injection if you: are sensitive or allergic to adrenaline or any of the other ingredients in this injection. Please tell your doctor or nurse before being given the injection if you: are in shock or have lost a lot of blood. have any heart disease. have Phaeochromocytoma (a tumour on the adrenal gland). have low blood levels of Potassium or high blood levels of Calcium. have a tumour on your prostate gland. are suffering from glaucoma (increased pressure in the eye). are going to have an operation under general anaesthetic. are a diabetic. are suffering from high blood pressure. Using other medicines:

Please tell your doctor or nurse if you are taking or have recently taken any other medicines, including medicines obtained without a prescription. This is especially important with the following medicines as they may interact with your Adrenaline (epinephrine) 1 in 1000 Injection:

Other medicines to treat high blood pressure or a heart condition. Corticosteroids (medicines used to treat inflammatory conditions in your body such as asthma or arthiritis). Aminophylline and Theophylline (medicines to help you breathe). Any cough or cold remedies. Antihistamines (for the treatment of allergies). Antidepressant medicines (for example; imipramine). Medicines to treat mental illness (for example; chlorpromazine, pericyazine, or fluphenazine). Medicines to treat an underactive thyroid gland. Pregnancy or breast feeding:

Please tell your doctor or nurse before being given this injection if you are pregnant. The doctor will then decide if the injection is suitable for you.

Please tell your doctor or nurse before being given this injection if you are breast feeding - this injection should not be used by nursing (breast feeding) mothers.

Driving and using machines:

You should not drive or use machinery if you are affected by the administration of Adrenaline (epinephrine) 1 in 1000 Injection.

How to use Adrenaline (epinephrine) 1 in 1000 Injection

Your nurse or doctor will give you the injection.

Your doctor will decide the correct dosage for you and how and when the injection will be given.

Since the injection will be given to you by a doctor or nurse, it is unlikely that you will be given too much. If you think you have been given too much, you must tell the person giving you the injection.

Adrenaline must NOT be injected into fingers, toes, ears, nose or genitalia. Intramuscular injection in the buttocks should be avoided.

Possible side effects

Like all medicines, Adrenaline (epinephrine) 1 in 1000 Injection can cause side effects, although not everybody gets them.

Allergic reactions to Adrenaline and to Sodium Metabisulphite (contained in this injection) have been reported. The possibility of these should not stop you from using this injection for the treatment of serious allergic reactions or other emergency situations. Tell your doctor immediately if you have any difficulty breathing, a rash or itchy skin. You may suffer from anxiety, headache or tremors. If you suffer from Parkinson’s Disease, you may notice that the symptoms or rigidity and tremor get worse. You may feel weak or dizzy. High blood sugar levels may occur. Low blood levels of potassium may occur. Metabolic acidosis (an in-balance of certain constituents in your blood) may occur. You may experience a faster heart beat or high blood pressure. Chest pain may occur. In rare cases the increase in blood pressure following Adrenaline Injection has caused bleeding around the brain and paralysis. You may experience coldness of the extremities. You may experience difficulty in breathing or sweating. You may experience nausea or vomiting. There may be some tissue damage at the site of injection after repeated injections of adrenaline, and elsewhere in the body (for example; in the fingers and toes, liver and kidney). You may find it difficult to pass urine.

If you think this injection is causing you any problems, or you are at all worried, talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Storing Adrenaline (epinephrine) 1 in 1000 Injection

Your injection will be stored in a cool place and protected from light. The nurse or doctor will check that the injection is not past its expiry date before giving you the injection.

Further information What Adrenaline (epinephrine) 1 in 1000 Injection contains:

Each ml of solution for injection contains 1 mg of adrenaline (epinephrine) as the acid tartrate.

Adrenaline Injection contains the following inactive ingredients: sodium metabisulphite, sodium chloride, sodium hydroxide, hydrochloric acid, water for injections.

What Adrenaline (epinephrine) 1 in 1000 Injection looks like and contents of the pack:

The injection is supplied in 1 ml clear glass ampoules. 10 ampoules supplied in each carton.

The marketing authorisation number of this medicine is: PL 01502/0024

Marketing Authorisation Holder: hameln pharmaceuticals ltd Gloucester United Kingdom Manufacturer: hameln pharmaceuticals gmbh Langes Feld 13 31789 Hameln Germany

For any information about this medicine, please contact the Marketing Authorisation Holder

This leaflet was last approved 03.03.2009

43823/20/09


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Hydroxyzine Suspension


Pronunciation: hye-DROX-i-zeen
Generic Name: Hydroxyzine
Brand Name: Vistaril
Hydroxyzine Suspension is used for:

Treating anxiety, causing sedation before and after general anesthesia, and treating itching due to certain allergic conditions, including hives and contact dermatitis (eg, poison ivy). It also may be used for other conditions as determined by your doctor.

Hydroxyzine Suspension is an antihistamine. It works by affecting the brain to reduce anxiety. It also has other activities, including opening breathing tubes, relieving pain or allergy symptoms, and preventing or treating nausea and vomiting caused by motion sickness.

Do NOT use Hydroxyzine Suspension if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Hydroxyzine Suspension you are taking sodium oxybate (GHB) you are in your first 3 months of pregnancy

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Video: Treatment for Depression

Treatments for depression are getting better everyday and there are things you can start doing right away.

Before using Hydroxyzine Suspension:

Some medical conditions may interact with Hydroxyzine Suspension. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you have asthma, glaucoma, difficulty urinating, a urinary or intestinal blockage, a prostate disease, or a blood disease if you drink alcoholic beverages

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Hydroxyzine Suspension. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Sodium oxybate (GHB) because side effects, such as an increase in sleep duration and slowed breathing, may occur

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Hydroxyzine Suspension may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Hydroxyzine Suspension:

Use Hydroxyzine Suspension as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Take Hydroxyzine Suspension by mouth with or without food. If stomach upset occurs, take with food to reduce stomach irritation. Shake well before each use. Use a measuring device marked for medicine dosing. Ask your pharmacist for help if you are unsure of how to measure your dose. If you miss a dose of Hydroxyzine Suspension and you are using it regularly, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for you next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Hydroxyzine Suspension.

Important safety information: Hydroxyzine Suspension may cause drowsiness. These effects may be worse if you take it with alcohol or certain medicines. Use Hydroxyzine Suspension with caution. Do not drive or perform other possibly unsafe tasks until you know how you react to it. Avoid drinking alcohol or using medicines that may cause drowsiness (eg, sleep aids, muscle relaxers) while you are using Hydroxyzine Suspension; it may add to their effects. Ask your pharmacist if you have questions about which medicines may cause drowsiness. The effectiveness of Hydroxyzine Suspension as anxiety treatment for longer than 4 months is not known. Use Hydroxyzine Suspension with caution in the ELDERLY; they may be more sensitive to its effects. Hydroxyzine Suspension should not be used in NEWBORNS; safety and effectiveness in newborns have not been confirmed. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: Do not use Hydroxyzine Suspension if you are in your first 3 months of pregnancy. If you think you may be pregnant, contact your doctor right away. It is not known if Hydroxyzine Suspension is found in breast milk. Do not breast-feed while taking Hydroxyzine Suspension. Possible side effects of Hydroxyzine Suspension:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Drowsiness; dry mouth.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); involuntary movements.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

See also: Hydroxyzine side effects (in more detail)

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center, or emergency room immediately. Symptoms may include unusual drowsiness or dizziness.

Proper storage of Hydroxyzine Suspension:

Store Hydroxyzine Suspension at room temperature, between 59 and 86 degrees F (15 and 30 degrees C), in a tightly closed container. Do not freeze. Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Hydroxyzine Suspension out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Hydroxyzine Suspension, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Hydroxyzine Suspension is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about Hydroxyzine Suspension. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Hydroxyzine resources Hydroxyzine Side Effects (in more detail) Hydroxyzine Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Hydroxyzine Drug Interactions Hydroxyzine Support Group 99 Reviews for Hydroxyzine - Add your own review/rating Compare Hydroxyzine with other medications Allergic Urticaria Allergies Anxiety Interstitial Cystitis Nausea/Vomiting Pain Pruritus Sedation
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Anexate


UK

Roche

Anexate 500 micrograms/5 ml Ampoule

Flumazenil

Please read all of this leaflet carefully before you start taking this medicine. Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again. If you have any further questions, ask your doctor or nurse. If any of the side effects become serious or troublesome, or if you notice any side effects not listed in this leaflet, please tell your doctor or nurse. In this leaflet: 1. What Anexate is and what it is used for 2. Before you are given Anexate 3. How Anexate will be given 4. Possible side effects 5. How Anexate is stored 6. Further information What Anexate is and what it is used for

Anexate contains a medicine called flumazenil. It is used to wake you up after you have been made sleepy by a medicine called a ‘benzodiazepine’.

Anexate reverses the effects of the ‘benzodiazepine’ medicine. It is used to:

Wake you up after an operation or medical test. Help you to breathe for yourself and wake up if you have been on a ventilator in intensive care. Before you are given Anexate You must not be given Anexate if you are allergic (hypersensitive) to: Flumazenil or any of the other ingredients of Anexate (listed in Section 6: Further information). ‘Benzodiazepine’ medicines. These include diazepam, midazolam and temazepam.

You must not be given Anexate if any of the above apply to you. If you are not sure, talk to your doctor or nurse before having Anexate.

You must not be given Anexate if: You are already taking a ‘benzodiazepine’ medicine to treat a very serious illness (such as raised intra-cranial pressure or status epilepticus). You have taken a ‘benzodiazepine’ medicine and certain anti-depressant medicines at the same time and this has made you ill. These anti-depressant medicines (known as tricyclic or tetracyclic anti-depressants) include medicines such as amitriptyline, imipramine and dothiepin hydrochloride.

You must not be given Anexate if any of the above apply to you. If you are not sure, talk to your doctor or nurse before having Anexate.

Take special care with Anexate

Check with your doctor or nurse before having Anexate if:

You have a head injury. You have epilepsy and are being treated with a ‘benzodiazepine’ medicine. You are very nervous about having your operation or medical test. You have a history of anxiety. You have heart disease or liver problems.

If any of the above apply to you, or if you are not sure, talk to your doctor or nurse before you have Anexate.

Taking other medicines

Please tell your doctor or nurse if you are taking or have recently taken any other medicines. This includes medicines that you buy without a prescription and herbal medicines. This is because Anexate can affect the way some other medicines work. Also some other medicines can affect the way Anexate works.

In particular, tell your doctor or nurse if you are taking any of the following medicines:

‘Benzodiazepine’ medicines, even if you have not taken them in the last few weeks. These include diazepam, midazolam and temazepam. Zopiclone (used to help you sleep). Medicines that change your mood or behaviour. These include medicines called tranquillizers, antidepressants and sedatives. Pregnancy and breast-feeding

Talk to your doctor or nurse before having Anexate if you are pregnant, might become pregnant or are breast-feeding.

Driving and using machines Do not drive or use any tools or machines for at least 24 hours after having Anexate. Do not do anything that is physically or mentally demanding for at least 24 hours after having Anexate.

This is because the effects of the ‘benzodiazepine’ medicine may return and you may start to feel sleepy again.

How Anexate will be given

Anexate will be given to you by a doctor. It will be given to you as a slow injection into one of your veins.

The dose of Anexate varies from one patient to another. It depends on your age, weight, how well your liver and kidneys are working and what you need the medicine for. The doctor will work out how much to give you.

If you have any further questions on the use of this medicine, ask your doctor or nurse.

Anexate Side Effects

Like all medicines Anexate can cause side effects, although not everyone gets them.

Allergic reactions (very rare)

If you have an allergic reaction, see a doctor straight away. The signs may include:

Sudden swelling of the throat, face, lips or mouth. This can make it difficult to breathe or swallow. Sudden swelling of the hands, feet or ankles. Skin rash or itching. Other possible side effects:

Stomach and gut

Feeling sick or being sick.

Heart and circulation

Redness of the face and neck (flushing). Increased blood pressure and increased heart rate. These effects have been seen in people having Anexate in intensive care. Changed heart rate. This is most likely in people given Anexate after an overdose of more than one medicine, including at least one ‘benzodiazepine’, especially if taken with certain anti-depressants.

Mind and nervous system

Feeling agitated, anxious or frightened. These effects can happen to people who have woken up too quickly. Panic attacks (in people who have had panic attacks in the past). Convulsions (seizures). These are more likely in people who already have epilepsy or severe liver problems or in people who have taken ‘benzodiazepine’ medicines for a long time. Convulsions are also more likely in people given Anexate after an overdose of more than one medicine, including at least one ‘benzodiazepine’, especially if taken with certain anti-depressants.

Withdrawal symptoms

If you have recently been taking ‘benzodiazepine’ medicines (for example to help you sleep or to treat anxiety), you may get withdrawal symptoms after having Anexate. This may happen even if you stopped taking these medicines a few days or weeks before having Anexate. Withdrawal symptoms include disturbed sleep, depression, feeling nervous, feeling irritable, feeling dizzy, a rapid heartbeat, diarrhoea and sweating.

If any of the side effects become serious or troublesome, or if you notice any side effects not listed in this leaflet, please tell your doctor or nurse.

How Anexate is stored Your doctor or pharmacist is responsible for storing Anexate. They are also responsible for disposing of any unused Anexate correctly. Keep out of the reach and sight of children. Do not use after the expiry date which is stated on the pack. Do not store above 30?C. Further information What Anexate contains

The active substance in Anexate 500 micrograms/5 ml Ampoule is flumazenil. Each millilitre (ml) of liquid medicine contains 100 micrograms of flumazenil. Each ampoule (small glass bottle) contains 500 micrograms of flumazenil (in 5 ml of liquid).

The other ingredients are disodium edetate, glacial acetic acid, sodium chloride, sodium hydroxide and water for injections.

What Anexate looks like and contents of the pack

Anexate is a clear almost colourless liquid (‘solution for injection or infusion’). This liquid may be further diluted to make it weaker before it is given to you.

Anexate is supplied in clear glass ampoules in packs of 5 or 25. Not all packs may be marketed.

Marketing Authorisation Holder and Manufacturer

The Marketing Authorisation Holder and Manufacturer is:

Roche Products Limited 6 Falcon Way Shire Park Welwyn Garden City AL7 1TW United Kingdom

This leaflet was last approved in November 2008.


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Furosemide Injection BP


Furosemide Injection

Important information about your medicine Your doctor or nurse will give you the injection If this injection causes you any problems talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist Please tell your doctor or pharmacist, if you have any other medical conditions or have an allergy to any of the ingredients of this medicine Please tell your doctor or pharmacist, if you are taking any other medicines Read all of this leaflet carefully before you start using this medicine. In some circumstances this may not be possible and this leaflet will be kept in a safe place should you wish to read it. Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again If you have any further questions, please ask your doctor or your pharmacist. This medicine has been prescribed for you personally and you should not pass it on to others. It may harm them, even if their symptoms are the same as yours. Where to find information in this leaflet 1. What Furosemide Injection is and what it is used for 2. Before you are given Furosemide Injection 3. How to use Furosemide Injection 4. Possible side effects 5. Storing Furosemide Injection 6. Further information What Furosemide Injection is and what it is used for

Furosemide Injection is a powerful, quick acting diuretic which causes the body to increase the production of urine. It is used to:

remove large amounts of fluid that has accumulated in the tissues and lungs (oedema) treat high blood pressure in emergencies increase the production of urine in kidney failure Before you are given Furosemide Injection You should NOT be given Furosemide Injection if you: Are sensitive or allergic to Furosemide Injection or any of the other ingredients in this injection. If you are allergic to a group of drugs called sulphonamides (e.g. Co-Trimoxazole) you may also be allergic to this injection. You are dehydrated, your blood volume is low (you may feel dizzy, faint or have pale skin) or you are unable to pass urine. You have low levels of potassium or sodium or an imbalance of chemicals in your blood. You have liver cirrhosis that is affecting your consciousness. You previously received certain medicines that have damaged your kidneys. Please tell your doctor or nurse before being given the injection if you have: You have hypotension (low blood pressure) You have (or potentially may have) diabetes You have gout You have (or have had) any problems with your liver or kidneys You have difficulty in passing water, for example because of a large prostate gland Using other medicines:

Please tell your doctor or nurse if you are taking or have recently taken any other medicines, including medicines obtained without a prescription. This is especially important with the following medicines as they may interact with your Furosemide Injection:

medicines to help your heart beat (e.g. digoxin) medicines to help your heart beat regularly (e.g. amiodarone) medicines to lower your blood pressure particularly medicines known as ACE inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor antagonists lithium medicines used to treat pain or inflammation (e.g. indometacin, ketorolac, acetylsalicylic acid) antibiotics cisplatin methotrexate ciclosporin medicines to treat epilepsy e.g. phenytoin, carbamazepine corticosteroids chloral hydrate or triclofos medicines to relax your muscles Pregnancy or breast feeding:

Please tell your doctor or nurse before being given this injection if you are pregnant or breast feeding. The doctor will then decide if the injection is suitable for you.

Driving and using machines:

You should not drive or use machinery if you are affected by the administration of Furosemide Injection.

How to use Furosemide Injection

Your nurse or doctor will give you the injection.

Your doctor will decide the correct dosage for you and how and when the injection will be given.

Since the injection will be given to you by a doctor or nurse, it is unlikely that you will be given too much. If you think you have been given too much, you must tell the person giving you the injection.

During treatment with Furosemide Injection, your doctor may want you to have blood tests to show if the chemicals and fluids in your body are balanced.

If Furosemide injection is given to a premature infant then the doctor will monitor the infant’s kidneys to ensure that the Furosemide injection is not causing any problems.

Possible side effects

Like all medicines, Furosemide Injection can cause side effects, although not everybody gets them.

allergic reactions such as rash, itching, difficulty breathing or swelling of the face or lips feeling sick, diarrhoea blurred vision, headache skin rashes, including blistering and sensitivity/over reacting to sunlight muscle spasms or cramps caused by chemical imbalances in the blood and body fluids hearing problems (such as deafness or ringing in the ears) aching or swollen joints (gout) high blood sugar, sugar in the urine low blood pressure which may cause dizziness when standing up Inflammation of the pancreas, kidneys or blood vessels deposits of calcium in the kidneys changes in the blood which may cause increased bleeding or bruising, or make you more likely to catch infections increased levels of cholesterol or triglycerides in the blood. changes in the rhythm of your heart. greater difficulties for patients with existing problems in passing urine (e.g. enlarged prostate).

If you think this injection is causing you any problems, or you are at all worried, talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Storing Furosemide Injection

Your injection will be stored at less than 25°C and protected from light. The nurse or doctor will check that the injection is not past its expiry date before giving you the injection.

Further information What Furosemide Injection contains:

This injection contains the active ingredient furosemide. Each 1 ml of solution contains 10 mg furosemide in a sterile solution for injection.

This injection contains the following inactive ingredients: sodium chloride, sodium hydroxide and sterile water for injections.

This injection contains a maximum of 4 mg of sodium per ml. To be taken into consideration by patients on a controlled sodium diet.

What Furosemide Injection looks like and contents of the pack:

Furosemide Injection is supplied in 2 ml, 5 ml and 25 ml amber glass ampoules. The injection is supplied in cartons of 10 ampoules. Not all ampoule sizes may be marketed.

The marketing authorisation number of this medicine is: PL 01502/0032

Marketing Authorisation Holder: hameln pharmaceuticals ltd Gloucester United Kingdom Manufacturer: hameln pharmaceuticals gmbh Langes Feld 13 31789 Hameln Germany

For any information about this medicine, please contact the Marketing Authorisation Holder

This leaflet was last approved 19.08.2008

44174/20/09


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Zoladex LA 10.8mg


Zoladex LA 10.8 mg Implant

goserelin

Read all of this leaflet carefully before you start using this medicine. Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again. If you have any further questions, ask your doctor, nurse or pharmacist. This medicine has been prescribed for you. Do not pass it on to others. It may harm them, even if their symptoms are the same as yours. If any of the side effects get serious, or if you notice any side effects not listed in this leaflet, please tell your doctor, nurse or pharmacist. In this leaflet:

1. What Zoladex LA is and what it is used for
2. Before you are given Zoladex LA
3. How Zoladex LA will be given
4. Possible side effects
5. How to store Zoladex LA
6. Further information

What Zoladex LA is and what it is used for

Zoladex LA contains a medicine called goserelin. This belongs to a group of medicines called ‘LHRH analogues’.

Zoladex LA is used to treat prostate cancer. It works by reducing the amount of ‘testosterone’ (a hormone) that is produced by your body. Zoladex LA is a long-acting form of Zoladex and it is given every 12 weeks.

Before you are given Zoladex LA Do not have Zoladex LA if: You are allergic (hypersensitive) to goserelin or any of the other ingredients of this medicine (listed in Section 6: Further information). You are a woman.

Do not have Zoladex LA if any of the above apply to you. If you are not sure, talk to your doctor or pharmacist before having Zoladex LA.

Zoladex LA should not be given to children.

Take special care with Zoladex LA

Check with your doctor or nurse before you have Zoladex LA if:

You have problems passing urine (water) or problems with your back. You have diabetes. You have high blood pressure. You suffer from depression. You have any condition that affects the strength of your bones, especially if you are a heavy drinker, a smoker, have a family history of osteoporosis (a condition that affects the strength of your bones) or take anticonvulsants (medicines for epilepsy or fits) or corticosteroids (steroids).

Medicines of this type can cause a reduction in bone calcium (thinning of bones).

If you go into hospital, tell the medical staff that you are having Zoladex LA.

Taking other medicines

Please tell your doctor or nurse if you are taking or have recently taken any other medicines. This includes medicines that you buy without a prescription and herbal medicines.

Driving and using machines

Zoladex LA is not likely to affect you being able to drive or use any tools or machines.

How Zoladex LA will be given The Zoladex LA 10.8 mg Implant will be injected under the skin on your stomach every 12 weeks. This will be done by your doctor or nurse. It is important that you keep having Zoladex LA treatment, even if you are feeling well. Keep having this treatment until your doctor decides that it is time for you to stop.

Your next appointment

You should be given a Zoladex LA injection every 12 weeks. Always remind the doctor or nurse to set up an appointment for your next injection. If you are given an appointment for your next injection which is earlier or later than 12 weeks from your last injection, tell your doctor or nurse. If it has been more than 12 weeks since your last injection, contact your doctor or nurse so that you can receive your injection as soon as possible. Possible side effects

Like all medicines, Zoladex LA can cause side effects, although not everybody gets them.

Allergic reactions:

These are rare. The symptoms can include sudden onset of:

Rash, itching or hives on the skin. Swelling of the face, lips or tongue or other parts of the body. Shortness of breath, wheezing or trouble breathing.

If this happens to you, see a doctor straight away.

Other possible side effects: Pain in your lower back or problems passing urine. If this happens, talk to your doctor. Bone pain at the beginning of treatment. If this happens, talk to your doctor. Hot flushes and sweating. A reduced sex drive and impotence. Thinning of your bones. Rises in blood sugar levels. Tingling in your fingers or toes. Skin rashes. Pain, bruising, bleeding, redness or swelling where Zoladex LA is injected. Pain in the joints. Reduced heart function. Changes in blood pressure. Swelling and tenderness of your breasts. Changes in your mood (including depression). Changes in your blood. Liver problems. A blood clot in your lungs causing chest pain or shortness of breath. Inflammation of the lungs. The symptoms may be like pneumonia (such as feeling short of breath and coughing). Psychiatric problems called psychotic disorders which may include hallucinations (seeing, feeling or hearing things that are not there), disordered thoughts and personality changes. This is very rare. The development of a tumour of the pituitary gland in your head or, if you already have a tumour in your pituitary gland, Zoladex LA may make the tumour bleed or collapse. These effects are very rare. Pituitary tumours can cause severe headaches, feeling or being sick, loss of eyesight and becoming unconscious.

Do not be concerned by this list of possible side effects. You may not get any of them.

If any of the side effects get serious, or if you notice any side effects not listed in this leaflet, please tell your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

How to store Zoladex LA Your doctor may give you a prescription so that you can get your medicine from the pharmacy and give it to your doctor when you see him or her again. Keep it in its original package and do not break the seal. Do not store it above 25°C. Keep it in a safe place where children cannot see it or reach it. Your medicine should not be used after the expiry date on the carton. If your medicine is not used, take it back to your pharmacist. Further information What Zoladex LA 10.8 mg Implant contains

The active substance is goserelin. Each Zoladex LA 10.8 mg Implant contains 10.8 mg of goserelin.

The other ingredient is lactide/glycolide copolymer which is an inactive substance.

What Zoladex LA 10.8 mg Implant looks like and contents of the pack

Zoladex LA 10.8 mg Implant comes as an implant (a very small pellet) in a pre-filled syringe, ready to be used by the doctor or nurse.

Zoladex LA 10.8 mg Implant is produced in packs of one implant (injection).

Marketing Authorisation Holder and Manufacturer

The Marketing Authorisation for Zoladex LA 10.8 mg Implant is held by

AstraZeneca UK Limited 600 Capability Green Luton LU1 3LU UK

Zoladex LA 10.8 mg Implant is manufactured by

AstraZeneca UK Limited Silk Road Business Park Macclesfield Cheshire SK10 2NA UK

To listen to or request a copy of this leaflet in Braille, large print or audio please call, free of charge:

0800 198 5000 (UK only)

Please be ready to give the following information:

Product name Zoladex LA 10.8 mg Implant

Reference number 17901/0065

This is a service provided by the Royal National Institute of Blind People.

Leaflet updated: February 2010

© AstraZeneca 2010

Zoladex is a trade mark of the AstraZeneca group of companies.

ONC 10 0008

P027718


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Virazole 6 g Aerosol


Virazole 6 g Aerosol

Ribavirin

Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again. This leaflet tells you about Virazole Aerosol. It does not contain all the information about Virazole. If you have any questions or are unsure of anything ask the doctor or nurse. If any side effect occurs and this becomes serious, tell the doctor or hospital pharmacist. In this leaflet: 1. What Virazole is and what it is used for 2. Before Virazole Aerosol is given 3. How Virazole Aerosol is given 4. Possible side effects 5. How Virazole Aerosol is stored 6. Further information What Virazole Is And What It Is Used For

Virazole belongs to a group of medicines called antivirals. Antiviral agents are used to treat viruses which cause infections. Virazole is used to treat a virus called Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV).

This virus infects the lungs. Virazole Aerosol is only to be used in babies and children.

Before Virazole Aerosol Is Given Take special care with Virazole

Virazole Aerosol is given to patients using a mask or a hood. It is possible that some of the Virazole may escape the mask or hood and lead to other people (e.g. visitors to the patient, doctors and nurses) being accidentally exposed to Virazole and breathing in the medicine.

To minimise unnecessary exposure to Virazole the doctor or nurse should turn off the machine (called SPAG or Aiolos Nebuliser) through which Virazole is given, 5 to 10 minutes before visitors see the patient. It is especially important for women who are pregnant, trying to become pregnant, or who are breast-feeding, to avoid exposure to Virazole Aerosol. This is because the risk of Virazole Aerosol causing harm to the unborn baby is unknown.

Using other medicines

Tell the doctor or nurse if you know that the patient is taking or has recently taken any other medicines, including medicines obtained without a prescription.

If adults are given Virazole

The following information is included in case an adult is given this medicine: Virazole should not be used in women who are pregnant, may become pregnant, or who are breast-feeding.

How Virazole Aerosol Is Given

Virazole Aerosol is used only in a hospital and is administered by a doctor or nurse.

Virazole Aerosol is usually given to patients using a mask or a hood. To administer Virazole, the doctor or nurse dissolves the Virazole powder in sterile water. This solution is then aerosolised (converted into a fine mist of droplets) using a device (equipment) called a Small Particle Aerosol Generator (SPAG) or a device called an Aiolos Nebuliser. The SPAG or Aiolos Nebuliser is connected to a face mask or hood so that the patient can breathe in the aerosol (fine droplets) into the infected lungs.

Patients who are on a ventilator to help them breathe will be monitored closely by the nurse or doctor during treatment with Virazole to prevent build up of Virazole fluid in the tubing associated with the ventilator equipment.

The usual dose is one vial of Virazole (equivalent to 6 g of ribavirin), inhaled each day over a period of 12 to 18 hours. Usually the treatment is given over 3 days. Sometimes the doctor may decide to treat the patient for up to 7 days.

Possible Side Effects

Like all medicines, Virazole can cause side effects, although not everybody gets them.

The following have occasionally been reported during treatment with Virazole:

Pneumonia Breathing becomes more difficult Collapse of the lung Anaemia (a reduction in red blood cells that can make the skin pale and cause weakness or breathlessness) has been reported when ribavirin has been given by injection and orally. Anaemia may also arise rarely with Virazole Aerosol.

It is not known whether Virazole caused all these problems.

If you are concerned about these side effects or if you notice any side effects not listed in this leaflet, please tell the doctor or hospital pharmacist.

Visitors and hospital staff may be accidentally exposed to Virazole Aerosol (see Section 2, “Before Virazole Aerosol is Given”). This can cause headache, wheezing, fever, and nasal congestion. These effects are most likely to happen in the doctors or nurses giving Virazole Aerosol to the patient.

How Virazole Aerosol Is Stored

All medicines should be kept out of the reach and sight of children.

Hospital staff should store Virazole in a dry place below 25?C.

This product should not be used after the expiry date shown on the box and Virazole vials. The expiry date refers to the last day of that month.
Once Virazole has been mixed with sterile water it should be used within 24 hours.

Medicines should not be disposed of via waste-water or household waste. The pharmacist should provide instructions as to how to dispose of medicines no longer required. These measures will help to protect the environment.

Further Information What Virazole contains The active substance is ribavirin. Each vial of Virazole contains 6 g of ribavirin. There are no other ingredients. What Virazole looks like and contents of the pack

Virazole is supplied in packs of three vials. Each vial contains 6 g of ribavirin white powder.

Marketing Authorisation Holder Meda Pharmaceuticals Ltd. Skyway House Parsonage Road Takeley Bishop’s Stortford CM22 6PU UK Manufacturer Labiana Pharmaceuticals S.L. Casanova 27-31 08757-Corbera de Llobregat (Barcelona) Spain

For any information about this medicine, please contact the Marketing Authorisation Holder.

This leaflet was last revised in June 2009.

34973E0EU-B00

562104V2103UK00


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Soluprick SQ 10 HEP


SOLUPRICK SQ 10 HEP

Solution for skin prick testing

Grass pollen, tree pollen, weed pollen, animal hair and dander and house dust mites

What You Should Know About Soluprick Sq

Please read this leaflet carefully before you start treatment with Soluprick SQ. Soluprick SQ is a solution for skin prick testing (SPT). It is used in the diagnosis of specific allergenic diseases. If you have any questions or are in any doubt about anything, please ask your doctor or nurse.

What Is The Skin Prick Testing For?

Soluprick SQ is used to check if you have an allergy to one of the following groups of allergens:

Grass pollen Tree pollen Weed pollen Animal hair and dander House dust mites

See section number 7

Before You Are Given Your Skin Prick Test Are you regularly taking Beta-blockers to control your blood pressure? Have you any skin problems in the area to be used for testing? Are you allergic to any of the ingredients in Soluprick SQ? Are you taking, antihistamines, hydroxyzine, ketotifen, tricyclic antidepressants or using steroid ointment? If the answer to any or all of the above questions is YES, TELL YOUR DOCTOR/NURSE BEFORE HE/SHE GIVES YOU SOLUPRICK SQ How Will You Be Given The Skin Prick Test? The Skin Prick Test is usually carried out on the inner side of the forearm. Alternatively the test can be done on your back. Your skin must be dry and clean and may be disinfected with alcohol by the nurse or doctor Test preparations and the controls are applied in droplets on the skin at an appropriate distance from each other (a numbered tape may be used). The top layer of the skin is pierced by the doctor/nurse with an ALK lancet through the droplets. The reaction is read after 15 minutes. A positive reaction is a pale small raised swelling or weal with a red edge. After You Have Been Given The Skin Prick Test

Normally a Skin Prick Test does not cause any problems but occasionally some people may get side effects such as:

A continuously spreading weal may be formed at the site during the first 10-20 minutes after application of the allergen. Widespread swelling and redness may happen 6-24 hours after the application of the allergen.

If you experience any of these side effects, and they stay or become troublesome, tell your doctor or pharmacist.

If you get any other unusual or unexpected side effect, you should tell your doctor or pharmacist at once.

Anaphylactic reaction

In extremely rare cases an anaphylactic reaction (a severe reaction throughout the body that is recognised by difficulty in breathing, fainting, itching, and weals) may develop after a few seconds or minutes. For this reason an emergency kit with a ‘ready for use’ adrenalin syringe will always be available.

TELL YOUR DOCTOR/NURSE IMMEDIATELY IF YOU FEEL ANY OF THESE CHANGES. He or she will be able to give you the right treatment at once to make you feel well.

How Should The Skin Prick Test Be Stored? The clinic/hospital will store the Skin Prick Test, solution. This medicine should be kept in a refrigerator (between 2?C and 8?C) out of the reach and sight of children, as the medicine could harm them. Do not freeze the solution. Keep the vials in the outer carton to protect it from light. Do not use the skin prick test solution after the expiry date, which is printed on the carton and label. What Is In The Medicine?

Soluprick SQ is a solution for skin prick testing that contains an extract of specific allergen. The allergen is the substance that causes the allergic disease. Soluprick SQ also contains the inactive ingredients, disodium phosphate, sodium dihydrogen phosphate, phenol, sodium chloride, glycerol and water for injections.

The following individual allergens are available:

Grass pollen: Meadow Foxtail, Cock’s Foot, Meadow Fescue, Perennial Ryegrass, Timothy Grass, Kentucky Blue Grass, Cultivated Rye.

Tree pollen: European Alder, Grey Alder, Silver Birch, Hazel

Weed pollen: Mugwort, Pellitory of the Wall, Upright Pellitory.

Animal hair and dander: Horse Dander, Dog Hair, Cat Hair

House dust mites: Dermatophagoides farinae, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus

Each single allergen is provided in a 2 ml glass vial.

The strength of the products is 10 HEP

The biological activity of Soluprick SQ is related to the reaction in the skin of an allergic patient measured relative to a histamine dihydrochloride solution.

Manufacturer And Product Licence Holder Product Licence Holder: ALK-Abell? A/S B?ge All? 6-8 DK-2970 H?rsholm Denmark Manufacturer: ALK-Abell? S.A. Miguel Fleta 19 E-28037 Madrid Spain Distributor ALK-Abell? Ltd. 1 Tealgate Hungerford Berkshire RG17 OYT United Kingdom Tel:01488 686 016 0. Date On Which The Package Leaflet Was Last Revised

June 2007

1. Further Information Allergy UK Tel:01322 619 898 Email:www.allergyuk.org
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Simulect 10mg powder and solvent for solution for injection or infusion


Simulect 10 mg powder and solvent for solution for injection or infusion

Basiliximab

Read all of this leaflet carefully before you are given this medicine. Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again. If you have any further questions, ask your doctor, nurse or pharmacist. If any of the side effects gets serious, or if you notice any side effects not listed in this leaflet, please tell your doctor, nurse or pharmacist. In this leaflet: 1. What Simulect is and what it is used for 2. Before you are given Simulect 3. How Simulect is given to you 4. Possible side effects 5. How to store Simulect 6. Further information What Simulect Is And What It Is Used For

Simulect belongs to a group of medicines called immunosuppressants. It is given in hospital to adults, adolescents and children who are having a kidney transplant. Immunosuppressants reduce the body’s response to anything that it sees as "foreign" – which includes transplanted organs. The body’s immune system thinks a transplanted organ is a foreign body and will try to reject it. Simulect works by stopping the immune cells that attack transplanted organs.

You will only be given two doses of Simulect. These will be given in hospital, around the time of your transplant operation. Simulect is given to stop your body from rejecting the new organ during the first 4 to 6 weeks after the transplant operation, when rejection is most likely. You will be given other medicines to help protect your new kidney during this time, such as ciclosporin and corticosteroids and after you leave hospital.

Before You Are Given Simulect

Follow your doctor’s instructions carefully. If you are unsure about anything, ask your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

You must not be given Simulect if you are allergic (hypersensitive) to basiliximab or any of the other ingredients of Simulect listed in section 6 under "What Simulect contains". Tell your doctor if you suspect you may have had an allergic reaction to any of these ingredients in the past. if you are pregnant or breast-feeding. Take special care with Simulect if you have previously received a transplant that failed after only a short time or, if you have previously been in the operating theatre for a transplantation that in the end was not performed.

In this situation, you may have received Simulect. Your doctor will check this for you and discuss with you the possibility of repeated treatment with Simulect.

Using other medicines

Please tell your doctor, nurse or pharmacist if you are using or have recently used any other medicines, including medicines obtained without a prescription.

Older patients (aged 65 years and over)

Simulect can be given to older patients, but the information available is limited. Your doctor may discuss this with you before you are given Simulect.

Children and adolescents (aged 1 to 17 years)

Simulect can be given to children and adolescents. The dose for children who weigh less than 35 kg will be smaller than the dose usually given to adults.

Pregnancy and breast-feeding

It is very important to tell your doctor before your transplant if you are pregnant or you think that you may be pregnant. You must not be given Simulect if you are pregnant. You must use adequate contraception to prevent pregnancy during treatment and up to 4 months after receiving the last dose of Simulect. If you become pregnant during this time, despite the use of contraceptive measures, you should tell your doctor immediately.

You should also tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding. Simulect may harm your baby. You must not breast-feed after being given Simulect or up to 4 months after the second dose.

Ask your doctor, nurse or pharmacist for advice before taking any medicine while you are pregnant or breast-feeding.

Driving and using machines

There is no evidence to indicate that Simulect has an effect on your ability to drive a car or use machines.

How Simulect Is Given To You

You will only be given Simulect if you are receiving a new kidney. Simulect is given twice, in hospital, either slowly through a needle in your vein as an infusion lasting 20–30 minutes or as an intravenous injection using a syringe.

If you have experienced a severe allergic reaction to Simulect or if you had complications after your surgery such as graft loss, the second dose of Simulect should not be given to you.

The first dose is given just before the transplant operation, and the second dose 4 days after the operation.

Usual dose for children and adolescents (aged 1 to 17 years) For children and adolescents who weigh less than 35 kg, the dose of Simulect given in each infusion or injection is 10 mg. For children and adolescents who weigh 35 kg or more, the dose of Simulect given in each infusion or injection is 20 mg. Usual dose for adults

The usual dose for adults is 20 mg in each infusion or injection.

If you are given too much Simulect

An overdose of Simulect is not likely to cause side effects straight away, but it may weaken your immune system for longer. Your doctor will watch out for any effects on your immune system and treat them if necessary.

Possible Side Effects

Like all medicines, Simulect can cause side effects, although not everybody gets them.

Tell your doctor or nurse as soon as possible if you get any unexpected symptoms while you are being given Simulect, or during the 8 weeks afterwards, even if you do not think that they are related to the medicine.

Sudden severe allergic reactions have been reported in patients treated with Simulect. If you notice sudden signs of allergy such as rash, itching or hives on the skin, swelling of the face, lips, tongue or other parts of the body, fast heart beat, dizziness, light headedness, shortness of breath, wheezing or trouble breathing or flu-like symptoms, tell your doctor or nurse immediately.

In children, the most commonly reported side effects were constipation, excessive growth of normal hair, runny or blocked nose, fever, high blood pressure, and various kinds of infections.

In adults, the most commonly reported side effects were constipation, nausea, diarrhoea, weight increase, headache, pain, swelling of hands, ankles or feet, high blood pressure, anaemia, changes in blood chemistry (e.g. potassium, cholesterol, phosphate, creatinine), surgical wound complications, and various kinds of infections.

If any of the side effects gets serious, or if you notice any side effects not listed in this leaflet, please tell your doctor or nurse.

How To Store Simulect

Store in a refrigerator (2°C - 8°C).

Keep out of the reach and sight of children.

Further Information What Simulect contains The active substance is basiliximab. Each vial contains 10 mg of basiliximab. The other ingredients are: potassium dihydrogen phosphate; disodium phosphate, anhydrous; sodium chloride; sucrose; mannitol (E421); glycine. What Simulect looks like and contents of the pack

Simulect comes as a white powder in a colourless glass vial containing 10 mg of basiliximab. It is supplied in a pack with a colourless glass ampoule containing 5 ml sterile water for injections. 2.5 ml of the sterile water is used to dissolve the powder before it is given to you.

Simulect is also available in vials with 20 mg basiliximab.

Marketing Authorisation Holder Novartis Europharm Limited Wimblehurst Road Horsham West Sussex RH12 5AB United Kingdom Manufacturer Novartis Pharma S.A.S. 26, rue de la Chapelle F-68333 Huningue France

For any information about this medicine, please contact the local representative of the Marketing Authorisation Holder:

United Kingdom Novartis Pharmaceuticals UK Ltd. Tel:+44 1276 698370

This leaflet was last approved in 10 / 2008


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levorphanol


Generic Name: levorphanol (lee VOR fa nole)
Brand Names: Levo-Dromoran

What is levorphanol?

Levorphanol is in a group of drugs called narcotic pain relievers. It is similar to morphine.

Levorphanol is used to treat moderate to severe pain.

Levorphanol may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about levorphanol? Levorphanol may be habit-forming and should be used only by the person it was prescribed for. Levorphanol should never be given to another person, especially someone who has a history of drug abuse or addiction. Keep the medication in a secure place where others cannot get to it. Do not drink alcohol while you are taking levorphanol. Dangerous side effects or death can occur when alcohol is combined with a narcotic pain medicine. Check your food and medicine labels to be sure these products do not contain alcohol.

Never take more levorphanol than is prescribed. Tell your doctor if the medicine seems to stop working as well in relieving your pain.

Video: Treatment for Depression

Treatments for depression are getting better everyday and there are things you can start doing right away.

Levorphanol can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert. Do not stop using levorphanol suddenly, or you could have unpleasant withdrawal symptoms. Talk to your doctor about how to avoid withdrawal symptoms when stopping the medication. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking levorphanol? Do not use this medication if you have ever had an allergic reaction to a narcotic medicine (examples include codeine, methadone, morphine, Oxycontin, Darvocet, Percocet, Vicodin, Lortab, and many others). You should also not take levorphanol if you are having an asthma attack or if you have a bowel obstruction called paralytic ileus. Levorphanol may be habit-forming and should be used only by the person it was prescribed for. Levorphanol should never be given to another person, especially someone who has a history of drug abuse or addiction. Keep the medication in a secure place where others cannot get to it.

Before using levorphanol, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have:

asthma, COPD, sleep apnea, or other breathing disorders;

liver or kidney disease;

underactive thyroid;

curvature of the spine;

a history of head injury or brain tumor;

epilepsy or other seizure disorder;

low blood pressure;

gallbladder disease;

Addison's disease or other adrenal gland disorders;

enlarged prostate, urination problems;

mental illness; or

a history of drug or alcohol addiction.

FDA pregnancy category C. This medication may be harmful to an unborn baby, and could cause addiction or withdrawal symptoms in a newborn. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. Levorphanol can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Older adults may be more sensitive to the effects of this medicine.

How should I take levorphanol?

Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Never take levorphanol in larger amounts, or use it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label. Tell your doctor if the medicine seems to stop working as well in relieving your pain.

Take this medicine with a full glass of water. Take levorphanol with food or milk if it upsets your stomach. Do not stop using levorphanol suddenly, or you could have unpleasant withdrawal symptoms. Talk to your doctor about how to avoid withdrawal symptoms when stopping the medication. Store levorphanol at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

Keep track of how many tablets have been used from each new bottle of this medicine. Levorphanol is a drug of abuse and you should be aware if any person in the household is using this medicine improperly or without a prescription.

See also: Levorphanol dosage (in more detail)

What happens if I miss a dose?

Since levorphanol is sometimes used as needed, you may not be on a dosing schedule. If you are using the medication regularly, take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and wait until your next regularly scheduled dose. Do not use extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of levorphanol can be fatal.

Overdose symptoms may include extreme drowsiness, pinpoint pupils, confusion, cold and clammy skin, weak pulse, shallow breathing, fainting, or breathing that stops.

What should I avoid while taking levorphanol? Do not drink alcohol while you are using levorphanol. Dangerous side effects or death can occur when alcohol is combined with levorphanol. Check your food and medicine labels to be sure these products do not contain alcohol. Levorphanol can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert. Levorphanol side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

shallow breathing, slow heartbeat;

seizure (convulsions);

cold, clammy skin;

confusion;

severe weakness or dizziness; or

feeling light-headed, fainting.

Less serious side effects are more likely to occur, such as:

nausea, vomiting, constipation, loss of appetite;

dizziness, headache, tired feeling;

dry mouth;

sweating;

itching;

urinating less than usual; or

loss of interest in sex.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Levorphanol Dosing Information

Usual Adult Dose for Light Sedation:

Premedication for Anesthesia:
1 to 2 mg IM or subcutaneously, administered 60 to 90 minutes before surgery. Older or debilitated patients usually require less drug. Two mg of levorphanol is approximately equivalent to 10 to 15 mg of morphine or 100 mg of meperidine.

Usual Adult Dose for Pain:

IV: 1 mg every 3 to 6 hours as needed.
IM or subcutaneous: 1 to 2 mg every 6 to 8 hours as needed.
Oral: 2 mg every 6 to 8 hours as needed.
May be increased to 3 mg every 6 to 8 hours.

What other drugs will affect levorphanol? Do not take levorphanol with other narcotic pain medications, sedatives, tranquilizers, muscle relaxers, or other medicines that can make you sleepy or slow your breathing. Dangerous side effects may result.

Before taking levorphanol, tell your doctor if you are using pentazocine (Talwin), nalbuphine (Nubain), butorphanol (Stadol), or buprenorphine (Buprenex, Subutex). If you are using any of these drugs, you may not be able to use levorphanol, or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment.

There may be other drugs that can interact with levorphanol. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

More levorphanol resources Levorphanol Side Effects (in more detail) Levorphanol Dosage Levorphanol Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Levorphanol Drug Interactions Levorphanol Support Group 5 Reviews for Levorphanol - Add your own review/rating levorphanol Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Levorphanol MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Levorphanol Prescribing Information (FDA) Levo-Dromoran Monograph (AHFS DI) Levo-Dromoran Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare levorphanol with other medications Light Sedation Pain Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about levorphanol.

See also: levorphanol side effects (in more detail)


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Lorazepam


Pronunciation: lor-AZ-e-pam
Generic Name: Lorazepam
Brand Name: Ativan Tablet
Lorazepam is used for:

Treating anxiety or anxiety associated with symptoms of depression. It may also be used for other conditions as determined by your doctor.

Lorazepam is a benzodiazepine. It works by slowing down the movement of chemicals in the brain. This results in a reduction in nervous tension (anxiety) and causes little sedation.

Do NOT use Lorazepam if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Lorazepam you are allergic to other benzodiazepines (eg, alprazolam) you have narrow-angle glaucoma, psychosis, or severe liver disease you are taking sodium oxybate (GHB)

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

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Treatments for depression are getting better everyday and there are things you can start doing right away.

Before using Lorazepam:

Some medical conditions may interact with Lorazepam. Tell your health care provider if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you are taking any other medicine that causes drowsiness (eg, narcotics, some antidepressants) if you have a history of lung problems (eg, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD]), muscle weakness or fatigue, glaucoma, liver problems, blood disorders, depression, mood or mental problems, or suicidal thoughts if you have a history of drug abuse or dependence

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Lorazepam. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Hydantoins (eg, phenytoin) or theophyllines because they may decrease Lorazepam's effectiveness Clozapine, kava, loxapine, narcotic pain relievers (eg, morphine, codeine), sodium oxybate (GHB), or valproic acid because side effects, such as extreme sedation, slowed breathing, confusion, or memory problems, may occur Digoxin, hydantoins (eg, phenytoin), narcotic pain relievers (eg, morphine, codeine), nondepolarizing muscle relaxants (eg, vecuronium), or sodium oxybate (GHB) because the risk of their side effects may be increased by Lorazepam Nondepolarizing muscle relaxants (eg, vecuronium) because they may decrease Lorazepam's effectiveness

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Lorazepam may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Lorazepam:

Use Lorazepam as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Take Lorazepam by mouth with or without food. If you use Lorazepam regularly and you miss a dose, take it as soon as possible. If several hours have passed or if it is nearing time for the next dose, do not double the dose to catch up, unless advised to by your doctor. If more than one dose is missed, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Lorazepam.

Important safety information: Lorazepam may cause drowsiness or dizziness. These effects may be worse if you take it with alcohol or certain medicines. Use Lorazepam with caution. Do not drive or perform other possibly unsafe tasks until you know how you react to it. Do not drink alcohol or use medicines that may cause drowsiness (eg, sleep aids, muscle relaxers) while you are using Lorazepam without first checking with your doctor; it may add to their effects. Ask your pharmacist if you have questions about which medicines may cause drowsiness. Lorazepam may be habit forming if you take Lorazepam in high doses or for a long time. Do NOT take more than the recommended dose or use for longer than prescribed without checking with your doctor. Lab tests, including liver function and complete blood counts, may be performed while you use Lorazepam. These tests may be used to monitor your condition or check for side effects. Be sure to keep all doctor and lab appointments. Use Lorazepam with caution in the ELDERLY; they may be more sensitive to its effects. Lorazepam should be used with extreme caution in CHILDREN younger than 12 years old; safety and effectiveness in these children have not been confirmed. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: Lorazepam has been shown to cause harm to the fetus. Do not become pregnant while you are using it. If you think you may be pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Lorazepam while you are pregnant. Lorazepam is found in breast milk. Do not breast-feed while taking Lorazepam.

Some people who use Lorazepam for a long time may develop a need to continue taking it. People who take high doses are also at risk. This is known as DEPENDENCE or addiction.

If you stop taking Lorazepam suddenly, you may have WITHDRAWAL symptoms. These may include agitation, anxiety, irritability, occasional seizures, or sleeplessness may occur if Lorazepam is suddenly stopped. If you need to stop Lorazepam, your doctor will lower your dose over time.

Possible side effects of Lorazepam:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Clumsiness; dizziness; drowsiness; headache; lightheadedness; unsteadiness; weakness.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); memory loss; mood or mental changes (eg, depression).

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

See also: Lorazepam side effects (in more detail)

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center, or emergency room immediately. Symptoms of overdose may include clumsiness; confusion; deep sleep; loss of consciousness; slow reflexes.

Proper storage of Lorazepam:

Store Lorazepam at room temperature, between 59 and 86 degrees F (15 and 30 degrees C). Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Lorazepam out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Lorazepam, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Lorazepam is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about Lorazepam. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Lorazepam resources Lorazepam Side Effects (in more detail) Lorazepam Dosage Lorazepam Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Lorazepam Drug Interactions Lorazepam Support Group 193 Reviews for Lorazepam - Add your own review/rating Lorazepam Prescribing Information (FDA) Lorazepam Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Lorazepam Monograph (AHFS DI) Ativan Consumer Overview Ativan Prescribing Information (FDA) lorazepam Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Compare Lorazepam with other medications Anxiety Cervical Dystonia Dysautonomia ICU Agitation Insomnia Light Anesthesia Nausea/Vomiting Nausea/Vomiting, Chemotherapy Induced Panic Disorder Sedation Status Epilepticus
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Ventolin Solution for IV Infusion


Ventolin Solution for Intravenous Infusion

1 mg/ml

salbutamol sulphate

Read all of this leaflet carefully before you start taking this medicine. Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again. If you have any further questions, ask your doctor, nurse or pharmacist. This medicine has been prescribed for you. Do not pass it on to others. It may harm them, even if their symptoms are the same as yours. If any of the side effects gets serious, or if you notice any side effects not listed in this leaflet, please tell your doctor, nurse or pharmacist. In this leaflet: 1 What Ventolin Infusion is and what it is used for 2 Before you use Ventolin Infusion 3 How to use Ventolin Infusion 4 Possible side effects 5 How to store Ventolin Infusion 6 Further information What Ventolin Infusion is and what it is used for

Ventolin Solution for Intravenous Infusion (called ‘Ventolin Infusion’ in this leaflet) contains a medicine called salbutamol. This belongs to a group of medicines called ‘beta-agonists’. It acts on special receptor sites in the lungs and in the uterus (in women) to:

help the airways in your lungs to stay open. This makes it easier for air to get in and out. It helps to relieve chest tightness, wheezing and cough relax the muscles in the walls of the uterus.

This may stop the contractions associated with labour.

Ventolin Infusion is used: to treat severe breathing problems in people with asthma and similar conditions to stop premature labour. Before you use Ventolin Infusion Do not use Ventolin Infusion if: you are allergic (hypersensitive) to salbutamol sulphate or any of the other ingredients of Ventolin Infusion (listed in Section 6). Take special care with Ventolin Infusion

Check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before taking your medicine if:

you have high blood pressure you are diabetic you have an overactive thyroid gland you have a history of heart problems such as an irregular or fast heartbeat or angina. Taking other medicines

Please tell your doctor, nurse or pharmacist if you are taking or have recently taken any other medicines, including medicines obtained without a prescription. This includes herbal medicines.

In particular tell your doctor, nurse or pharmacist if you are taking:

medicines for an irregular or fast heartbeat other medicines for your asthma.

Ventolin Infusion should not be administered in the same syringe or infusion as any other medication.

Using Ventolin with food and drink

You can use Ventolin Infusion at any time of day, with or without food.

Pregnancy and breast-feeding

Talk to your doctor before taking this medicine if you are pregnant, might become pregnant or are breast-feeding.

Driving and using machines

Ventolin is not likely to affect you being able to drive or use any tools or machines.

How to use Ventolin Infusion

You will never be expected to give yourself this medicine. It will always be given to you by a person who is qualified to do so.

The Ventolin Infusion will be diluted before it is given to you. Your doctor or nurse will find information about how to dilute the medicine in the Summary of Product Characteristics (SPC).

To treat severe breathing problems The usual dose is 3 to 20 micrograms of salbutamol per minute for as long as required. Higher doses may be used in patients with ‘respiratory failure’. To treat premature labour The usual dose is 10 to 45 micrograms of salbutamol per minute until contractions stop. If your labour continues despite this treatment then the infusion should be stopped.

Ventolin Solution for Intravenous Infusion is not suitable for treating children.

If you receive more Ventolin Infusion than you should

Ventolin Infusion will always be given under carefully controlled conditions. However, if you think that you have been given more than you should tell your doctor or nurse as soon as possible.

The following effects may happen:

your heart beating faster than usual you feel shaky.

These effects usually wear off in a few hours.

If you stop taking Ventolin Infusion

Do not stop taking Ventolin without talking to your doctor.

If you have any further questions on the use of this product, ask your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Possible side effects

Like all medicines, Ventolin Infusion can cause side effects, although not everybody gets them.

The following side effects may happen with this medicine:

Allergic reactions (affects less than 1 in 10,000 people)

If you have an allergic reaction, stop taking Ventolin and see a doctor straight away. Signs of an allergic reaction include: swelling of the face, lips, mouth, tongue or throat which may cause difficulty in swallowing or breathing, itchy rash, feeling faint and light headed, and collapse.

Talk to your doctor as soon as possible if: you feel your heart is beating faster or stronger than usual (palpitations). This is usually harmless, and usually stops after you have used the medicine for a while you may feel your heartbeat is uneven or it gives an extra beat these affect less than 1 in 10 people.

If any of these happen to you, talk to your doctor as soon as possible. Do not stop using this medicine unless told to do so.

Tell your doctor if you have any of the following side effects which may also happen with this medicine:

Very common (affects more than 1 in 10 people)

feeling shaky.

Common (affects less than 1 in 10 people)

headache muscle cramps.

Uncommon (affects less than 1 in 100 people)

patients receiving Ventolin Infusion for the treatment of premature labour: cough, wheezing, chest pain or shortness of breath, which may be signs of pulmonary oedema (fluid in the lungs). Tell your doctor immediately.

Rare (affects less than 1 in 1,000 people)

low level of potassium in your blood increased blood flow to your extremities (peripheral dilatation).

Very rare (affects less than 1 in 10,000 people)

changes in sleep patterns and changes in behaviour, such as restlessness and excitability. The following side effects can also happen but the frequency of these are not known: in the treatment of premature labour feeling sick and being sick (nausea and vomiting) chest pain, due to heart problems such as angina. Tell your doctor, nurse or pharmacist if this occurs. Do not stop using this medicine unless told to do so a condition known as lactic acidosis which may cause stomach pain, hyperventilation, shortness of breath, cold feet and hands, irregular heartbeat or thirst.

If any of the side effects gets serious, or if you notice any side effects not listed in this leaflet, please tell your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

If you think this medicine is not working well enough for you

If your medicine does not seem to be working as well as usual, talk to your doctor as soon as possible. Your chest problem may be getting worse and you may need a different medicine.

Do not take extra Ventolin unless your doctor tells you to.

How to store Ventolin Infusion Keep out of the reach and sight of children. Do not store above 30°C. Keep the ampoules in the outer carton to protect from light. Use the medicine within 24 hours of mixing with infusion fluids. Do not use Ventolin Infusion after the expiry date, which is stated on the ampoule label and carton after ‘EXP’. The expiry date refers to the last day of that month. If you are told to stop taking this medicine return any unused Ventolin Infusion to your pharmacist to be destroyed.

Medicines should not be disposed of via wastewater or household waste. Ask your pharmacist how to dispose of medicines no longer required. These measures will help to protect the environment

Further information What Ventolin Infusion contains The active substance is salbutamol sulphate. The other ingredients are water, salt (sodium chloride) and sulphuric acid. What Ventolin Infusion looks like and contents of the pack

Ventolin Infusion comes in a 5 ml glass ampoule.

Each 5 ml ampoule contains 5 mg of salbutamol sulphate in sterile normal saline adjusted to pH 3.5.

Each carton contains 10 ampoules.

Marketing Authorisation Holder Glaxo Wellcome UK Limited trading as: Allen & Hanburys Stockley Park West Uxbridge Middlesex UB11 1BT Manufacturer GlaxoSmithKline Manufacturing S.p.A. San Polo di Torrile Parma Italy

Other formats:

To listen to or request a copy of this leaflet in Braille, large print or audio please call, free of charge:

0800 198 5000 (UK Only)

Please be ready to give the following information:

Product name Ventolin Infusion

Reference number 10949/0087

This is a service provided by the Royal National Institute of Blind People.

Leaflet date: January 2008

Ventolin is a trademark of the GlaxoSmithKline group of companies

© 2008 GlaxoSmithKline group of companies

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hexaminolevulinate Urinary bladder


hex-a-mee-noe-LEV-ue-lin-ate hye-droe-KLOR-ide

Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

Cysview

Available Dosage Forms:

Powder for Solution

Therapeutic Class: Diagnostic Agent, Radiopharmaceutical Imaging

Uses For hexaminolevulinate

Hexaminolevulinate is an imaging agent that is used in a procedure for the bladder called cystoscopy. Imaging agents help create an image or picture of body parts, such as the bladder. Hexaminolevulinate is used to check for cancer cells in the bladder.

hexaminolevulinate is to be used only by or under the direct supervision of a doctor.

Before Using hexaminolevulinate

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For hexaminolevulinate, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to hexaminolevulinate or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Appropriate studies have not been performed on the relationship of age to the effects of hexaminolevulinate in the pediatric population. Safety and efficacy have not been established.

Geriatric

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated geriatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of hexaminolevulinate in the elderly.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. Tell your healthcare professional if you are taking any other prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medicine.

Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of hexaminolevulinate. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

Bladder cancer that was treated with BCG (Bacillus Calmette-Guerin) solution in the past 90 days or Blood in the urine or Porphyria (an enzyme problem)—Should not be used in patients with these conditions. Bladder pain or Bladder spasm—Use with caution. May make these conditions worse. Proper Use of hexaminolevulinate

A nurse or other trained health professional will give you hexaminolevulinate in a hospital or clinic. hexaminolevulinate is given through a tube (catheter) that is placed in your bladder.

The tube will be taken out and the medicine must be held in the bladder for at least 1 hour. You may stand, sit, or move during this time. If you feel you cannot hold the medicine in the bladder for 1 hour, tell your doctor or nurse right away.

Precautions While Using hexaminolevulinate

hexaminolevulinate may cause a serious type of allergic reaction called anaphylaxis. Anaphylaxis can be life-threatening and requires immediate medical attention. Tell your doctor or nurse right away if you have a rash; itching; hoarseness; swelling of your hands, face, or mouth; trouble with breathing or swallowing; or chest pain after you receive the medicine.

hexaminolevulinate Side Effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor or nurse immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

More common Blood in the urine burning while urinating difficult or painful urination frequent urge to urinate lower stomach pain or spasm Incidence not known Bloody or cloudy urine cough difficulty with breathing or swallowing dizziness fast heartbeat fever hives itching nausea puffiness or swelling of the eyelids or around the eyes, face, lips, or tongue reddening of the skin, especially around the ears shortness of breath skin rash tightness in the chest unusual tiredness or weakness wheezing

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

The information contained in the Thomson Reuters Micromedex products as delivered by Drugs.com is intended as an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment. It is not a substitute for a medical exam, nor does it replace the need for services provided by medical professionals. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before taking any prescription or over the counter drugs (including any herbal medicines or supplements) or following any treatment or regimen. Only your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist can provide you with advice on what is safe and effective for you.

The use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products is at your sole risk. These products are provided "AS IS" and "as available" for use, without warranties of any kind, either express or implied. Thomson Reuters Healthcare and Drugs.com make no representation or warranty as to the accuracy, reliability, timeliness, usefulness or completeness of any of the information contained in the products. Additionally, THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE MAKES NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTIES AS TO THE OPINIONS OR OTHER SERVICE OR DATA YOU MAY ACCESS, DOWNLOAD OR USE AS A RESULT OF USE OF THE THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS. ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR USE ARE HEREBY EXCLUDED. Thomson Reuters Healthcare does not assume any responsibility or risk for your use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products.

More hexaminolevulinate Urinary bladder resources Hexaminolevulinate Urinary bladder Support Group 0 Reviews for Hexaminolevulinate Urinary bladder - Add your own review/rating Compare hexaminolevulinate Urinary bladder with other medications Diagnosis and Investigation
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nadolol


Generic Name: nadolol (na DOE lol)
Brand Names: Corgard

What is nadolol?

Nadolol is in a group of drugs called beta-blockers. Beta-blockers affect the heart and circulation (blood flow through arteries and veins).

Nadolol is used to treat angina (chest pain) or hypertension (high blood pressure).

Nadolol may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about nadolol? Do not stop taking nadolol without first talking to your doctor. Stopping suddenly may make your condition worse. If you need surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using nadolol. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time. Nadolol may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert.

Keep using this medicine as directed, even if you feel well. High blood pressure often has no symptoms. You may need to use blood pressure medication for the rest of your life.

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Nadolol is only part of a complete program of treatment for hypertension that may also include diet, exercise, and weight control. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely if you are being treated for hypertension.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking nadolol? You should not take nadolol if you are allergic to it, or if you have:

asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD;

certain serious heart conditions such as"AV block" or slow heart rhythm; or

conditions that cause very low blood pressure.

If you have any of these other conditions, you may need a nadolol dose adjustment or special tests:

bronchitis, emphysema, sleep apnea, or other breathing problem;

congestive heart failure;

liver or kidney disease;

diabetes;

a thyroid disorder; or

pheochromocytoma (tumor of the adrenal gland).

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether nadolol will harm an unborn baby. Nadolol may cause heart or lung problems in a newborn if the mother takes the medication during pregnancy. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication. Nadolol can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while taking nadolol. How should I take nadolol?

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results.

Your blood pressure will need to be checked often, and you may need other blood tests at your doctor's office. Visit your doctor regularly.

Do not skip doses or stop taking nadolol without first talking to your doctor. Stopping suddenly may make your condition worse. If you need surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using nadolol. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time.

Taking nadolol can make it harder for you to tell when your blood sugar is low. If you have diabetes, check your blood sugar regularly.

This medication can cause false results with certain lab tests of the urine. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using nadolol.

Keep using this medicine as directed, even if you feel well. High blood pressure often has no symptoms. You may need to use blood pressure medication for the rest of your life.

Nadolol is only part of a complete program of treatment for hypertension that may also include diet, exercise, and weight control. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely if you are being treated for hypertension.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light.

See also: Nadolol dosage (in more detail)

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if your next dose is less than 8 hours away. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include slow heart rate, extreme dizziness, or fainting.

What should I avoid while taking nadolol? Nadolol may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert. Drinking alcohol can further lower your blood pressure and may increase certain side effects of nadolol. Nadolol side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

slow or uneven heartbeats;

numbness or cold feeling;

feeling like you might pass out;

feeling short of breath, even with mild exertion;

swelling or rapid weight gain;

bronchospasm (wheezing, chest tightness, trouble breathing);

hallucinations, behavior changes; or

nausea, upper stomach pain, itching, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes).

Less serious side effects may include:

dizziness, spinning sensation;

tired feeling;

mild nausea, diarrhea, constipation, upset stomach, bloating, gas; or

tingly feeling.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Nadolol Dosing Information

Usual Adult Dose for Angina Pectoris:

Initial dose: 40 mg orally once a day.
Maintenance dose: 40-80 mg orally once a day.
Doses up to 160-240 mg may be needed.

Usual Adult Dose for Hypertension:

Initial dose: 40 mg orally once a day.
Maintenance dose: 40-80 mg orally once a day.
Doses up to 240-320 mg may be needed.

Usual Adult Dose for Parkinsonian Tremor:

Initial dose: 40-60 mg orally once a day.
Maintenance dose: 40-80 mg orally once a day.

Usual Adult Dose for Anxiety:

Initial dose: 40 mg orally once a day.
Maintenance dose: 40-80 mg orally once a day.
Doses up to 320 mg may be needed.

Usual Adult Dose for Benign Essential Tremor:

Initial dose: 40 mg orally once a day.
Maintenance dose: 40-80 mg orally once a day.
Doses up to 320 mg may be needed.

Usual Adult Dose for Esophageal Variceal Hemorrhage Prophylaxis:

Initial dose: 40 mg orally once a day.
Maintenance dose: 40-80 mg orally once a day.
Doses up to 320 mg may be needed.

Usual Adult Dose for Glaucoma:

Initial dose: 40 mg orally once a day.
Maintenance dose: 40-80 mg orally once a day.
Doses up to 320 mg may be needed.

Usual Adult Dose for Lithium Tremor:

Initial dose: 40 mg orally once a day.
Maintenance dose: 40-80 mg orally once a day.
Doses up to 320 mg may be needed.

Usual Adult Dose for Migraine Prophylaxis:

Initial dose: 40 mg orally once a day.
Maintenance dose: 40-80 mg orally once a day.
Doses up to 320 mg may be needed.

Usual Adult Dose for Supraventricular Tachycardia:

Initial dose: 40 mg orally once a day.
Maintenance dose: 40-80 mg orally once a day.
Doses up to 320 mg may be needed.

What other drugs will affect nadolol?

Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use, especially:

digoxin (digitalis, Lanoxin);

a diuretic (water pill);

insulin or oral diabetes medication; or

reserpine.

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with nadolol. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More nadolol resources Nadolol Side Effects (in more detail) Nadolol Dosage Nadolol Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Nadolol Drug Interactions Nadolol Support Group 11 Reviews for Nadolol - Add your own review/rating nadolol Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Nadolol Prescribing Information (FDA) Nadolol Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Nadolol Monograph (AHFS DI) Nadolol MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Corgard Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare nadolol with other medications Angina Anxiety Benign Essential Tremor Esophageal Variceal Hemorrhage Prophylaxis Glaucoma High Blood Pressure Lithium Tremor Migraine Prevention Mitral Valve Prolapse Parkinsonian Tremor Supraventricular Tachycardia Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about nadolol.

See also: nadolol side effects (in more detail)


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Midazolam


Pronunciation: meh-DAZE-oh-lam
Generic Name: Midazolam
Brand Name: Generic only. No brands available.

Midazolam may cause severe breathing problems (eg, respiratory depression, respiratory arrest), especially when used for sedation in noncritical care settings. Respiratory depression and respiratory arrest could result in brain damage or death if not treated properly. Midazolam should only be used under appropriate close medical supervision.

Do not give Midazolam by rapid intravenous (IV) injection to newborn infants (neonates). Severe low blood pressure and seizures have occurred in neonates when given Midazolam by rapid IV injection, especially when given at the same time as fentanyl.


Midazolam is used for:

Reducing anxiety or producing drowsiness or anesthesia before certain medical procedures or surgery. It may also be given continuously to maintain sedation or anesthesia in certain patients. It may also be used for other conditions as determined by your doctor.

Midazolam is a benzodiazepine. It works in the central nervous system (brain) to cause sleepiness, muscle relaxation, and short-term memory loss, and to reduce anxiety.

Do NOT use Midazolam if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Midazolam you have acute narrow-angle glaucoma, severe mental problems (eg, psychosis), or severe liver disease you have alcohol intoxication with abnormal vital signs you are taking delavirdine, efavirenz, an HIV protease inhibitor (eg, ritonavir), or sodium oxybate (GHB)

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

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Treatments for depression are getting better everyday and there are things you can start doing right away.

Before using Midazolam:

Some medical conditions may interact with Midazolam. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you have breathing problems (eg, COPD); open-angle glaucoma; heart, liver, or kidney problems; the blood disease porphyria; severe depression; or a history of drug abuse or dependence; or if you have used alcohol recently

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Midazolam. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Carbamazepine, rifampin, or St. John's wort because the effectiveness of Midazolam may be decreased Azole antifungals (eg, itraconazole), barbiturates (eg, phenobarbital), clozapine, delavirdine, diltiazem, disulfiram, efavirenz, grapefruit juice, HIV protease inhibitors (eg, ritonavir), ketolides (eg, telithromycin), macrolides (eg, erythromycin), narcotic pain medicines (eg, codeine), nefazodone, omeprazole, sodium oxybate (GHB), valproic acid, or verapamil and its derivatives because serious side effects, such as low blood pressure, breathing problems, and excessive sedation, may occur Hydantoins because side effects may be increased by Midazolam

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Midazolam may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Midazolam:

Use Midazolam as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Midazolam is usually administered as an injection at your doctor's office, clinic, or hospital. Ask your doctor or pharmacist any questions that you may have about Midazolam. If Midazolam contains particles or is discolored, or if the vial is cracked or damaged in any way, do not use it. Keep this product, as well as syringes and needles, out of the reach of children and away from pets. Do not reuse needles, syringes, or other materials. Dispose of properly after use. Ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain local regulations for proper disposal. If you miss a dose of Midazolam, contact your doctor immediately.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Midazolam.

Important safety information: Midazolam may cause drowsiness or dizziness. Do not drive, operate machinery, or do anything else that could be dangerous until the effects of Midazolam have disappeared or until the day after you receive Midazolam, whichever is longer. Using Midazolam alone, with certain other medicines, or with alcohol may lessen your ability to drive or perform other potentially dangerous tasks. Avoid drinking alcohol or taking other medications that cause drowsiness (eg, sedatives, tranquilizers) while using Midazolam. Midazolam will add to the effects of alcohol and other depressants. Ask your pharmacist if you have questions about which medicines are depressants. Midazolam can cause partial or complete memory loss for several hours. Use Midazolam with caution in the ELDERLY because they may be more sensitive to its effects. Caution is advised when using Midazolam in CHILDREN because they may be more sensitive to its effects. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: Midazolam has been shown to cause harm to the fetus. If you plan on becoming pregnant, discuss with your doctor the benefits and risks of using Midazolam during pregnancy. Midazolam is excreted in breast milk. If you are or will be breast-feeding while you are using Midazolam, check with your doctor or pharmacist to discuss the risks to your baby.

When used for long periods of time or at high doses, some people develop a need to continue taking Midazolam. This is known as DEPENDENCE or addiction.

If you use Midazolam for long periods of time or at high doses and suddenly stop taking Midazolam, you may experience WITHDRAWAL symptoms including fast heartbeat, hallucinations, muscle cramps, seizures, stomach cramps, sweating, tremor, and vomiting.

Possible side effects of Midazolam:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Blurred vision; changes in blood pressure, breathing, and heartbeats; coughing; dizziness; drowsiness; dry mouth; headache; hiccups; low blood pressure (children); nausea; pain during injection; pain, redness, or tenderness at the injection site; short-term memory loss; slurred speech; vomiting.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); agitation; chest pain; combativeness; irregular breathing patterns; pain, swelling, or redness at the injection site; slow or difficult breathing; unusual or involuntary muscle movements or muscle tremor.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

See also: Midazolam side effects (in more detail)

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center, or emergency room immediately. Symptoms may include clumsiness; confusion; deep sleep; loss of consciousness; sleepiness; slow reflexes.

Proper storage of Midazolam:

Midazolam is usually handled and stored by a health care provider. If you are using Midazolam at home, store Midazolam as directed by your pharmacist or health care provider. Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Keep Midazolam out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Midazolam, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Midazolam is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about Midazolam. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Midazolam resources Midazolam Side Effects (in more detail) Midazolam Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Midazolam Drug Interactions Midazolam Support Group 6 Reviews for Midazolam - Add your own review/rating midazolam Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Midazolam Hydrochloride Monograph (AHFS DI) Compare Midazolam with other medications ICU Agitation Light Anesthesia Light Sedation
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Seconal Sodium


Generic Name: secobarbital (SEE koe BAR bi tal)
Brand Names: Seconal Sodium

What is Seconal Sodium (secobarbital)?

Secobarbital is in a group of drugs called barbiturates (bar-BIT-chur-ates). Secobarbital slows the activity of your brain and nervous system.

Secobarbital is used short-term to treat insomnia, or as a sedative before surgery.

Secobarbital may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Seconal Sodium (secobarbital)? Secobarbital may cause a severe allergic reaction. Stop taking secobarbital and get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Take secobarbital only when you are getting ready for several hours of sleep. You may fall asleep very quickly after taking the medicine.

Some people using this medicine have engaged in activity such as driving, and later having no memory of the activity. If this happens to you, stop taking secobarbital and talk with your doctor about another treatment for your sleep disorder.

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Treatments for depression are getting better everyday and there are things you can start doing right away.

Do not use secobarbital without telling your doctor if you are pregnant. It could cause harm to the unborn baby. Use an effective form of birth control, and tell your doctor if you become pregnant during treatment. Secobarbital can make birth control pills less effective. Ask your doctor about using a non-hormone method of birth control (such as a condom, diaphragm, spermicide) to prevent pregnancy while taking secobarbital. Secobarbital may be habit-forming and should be used only by the person it was prescribed for. Secobarbital should never be shared with another person, especially someone who has a history of drug abuse or addiction. Keep the medication in a secure place where others cannot get to it. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Seconal Sodium (secobarbital)?

Some people using this medicine have engaged in activity such as driving, and later having no memory of the activity. If this happens to you, stop taking secobarbital and talk with your doctor about another treatment for your sleep disorder.

Do not take this medication if you are allergic to secobarbital, or if you have porphyria.

If you have any of these other conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely take secobarbital:

severe asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD), or other breathing disorder;

a blood cell disorder such as anemia (lack of red blood cells);

epilepsy or other seizure disorder;

liver disease;

heart disease;

overactive thyroid;

a history of depression, mental illness, or suicide attempt; or

a history of drug or alcohol addiction.

Secobarbital may be habit-forming and should be used only by the person it was prescribed for. Secobarbital should never be shared with another person, especially someone who has a history of drug abuse or addiction. Keep the medication in a secure place where others cannot get to it. FDA pregnancy category D. This medication can cause harm to an unborn baby. Do not use secobarbital without your doctor's consent if you are pregnant. Tell your doctor if you become pregnant during treatment. Use an effective form of birth control while you are using this medication. Secobarbital can make birth control pills less effective. Ask your doctor about using a non-hormone method of birth control (such as a condom, diaphragm, spermicide) to prevent pregnancy while taking secobarbital. Secobarbital can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take Seconal Sodium (secobarbital)?

Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Take secobarbital only when you are getting ready for several hours of sleep. You may fall asleep very quickly after taking the medicine. Take this medicine with a full glass of water.

If you are taking this medicine to treat insomnia, take it only at bedtime. Do not use secobarbital for longer than 2 weeks to treat insomnia, unless your doctor has told you to.

Do not change your dose of secobarbital without your doctor's advice. Tell your doctor if the medication does not seem to work as well in treating your condition.

Store secobarbital at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

Keep track of how many pills have been used from each new bottle of this medicine. Secobarbital is a drug of abuse and you should be aware if any person in the household is using this medicine improperly or without a prescription.

See also: Seconal Sodium dosage (in more detail)

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Take secobarbital only when you are getting ready for several hours of sleep. If you do not have time to get a full night's sleep after taking the medication, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at your next regularly scheduled sleep time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of secobarbital can be fatal.

Overdose symptoms may include slow or shallow breathing, blurred vision, extreme drowsiness, feeling light-headed, or fainting.

What should I avoid while taking Seconal Sodium (secobarbital)? Secobarbital can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert. Cold or allergy medicine, narcotic pain medicine, sleeping pills, muscle relaxers, and medicine for seizures, depression or anxiety can add to sleepiness caused by secobarbital. Tell your doctor if you regularly use any of these other medicines. Avoid drinking alcohol. It can increase some of the side effects of secobarbital. Seconal Sodium (secobarbital) side effects Secobarbital may cause a severe allergic reaction. Stop taking secobarbital and get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

restless muscle movements in your eyes, tongue, jaw, or neck;

slow heartbeat, shallow breathing;

feeling like you might pass out;

a fever or a sore throat;

sores in your mouth;

easy bruising or bleeding; or

ongoing nightmares or increased dreaming.

Less serious side effects may include:

drowsiness or dizziness;

problems with memory or concentration;

excitement (especially in children or older adults);

upset stomach, constipation;

headache; or

"hangover" effect (drowsiness the day after a dose).

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Seconal Sodium (secobarbital)?

Many drugs can interact with secobarbital. Below is just a partial list. Tell your doctor if you are using:

acetaminophen (Tylenol);

a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin);

an antibiotic such as doxycycline (Adoxa, Doryx, Mondox, Oracea, Vibramycin, and others), griseofulvin (Grisactin, Fulvicin PG, Grifulvin V), or metronidazole (Flagyl);

birth control pills or estrogen hormone replacement, including estrogen (Premarin), estradiol (Estrace, Femtrace, and others), progesterone (Progest, Prometrium), and others;

theophylline (Theo-Dur, Theochron, Theolair, Slo-Bid, others);

a heart rhythm medication such as quinidine (Cardioquin, Quinidex, Quinora, Quinaglute);

seizure medications such as carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol), divalproex (Depakote), phenytoin (Dilantin), or valproic acid (Depakene);

heart or blood pressure medication such as atenolol (Tenormin), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol), propranolol (Inderal, InnoPran), felodipine (Plendil) nifedipine (Procardia, Adalat), verapamil (Calan);

an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate); or

steroids such as prednisone (Orasone, Deltasone), prednisolone (Prelone, Delta Cortef), methylprednisolone (Medrol), and others.

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with secobarbital. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Seconal Sodium resources Seconal Sodium Side Effects (in more detail) Seconal Sodium Dosage Seconal Sodium Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Seconal Sodium Drug Interactions Seconal Sodium Support Group 2 Reviews for Seconal Sodium - Add your own review/rating Seconal Sodium Prescribing Information (FDA) Secobarbital MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Compare Seconal Sodium with other medications Insomnia Light Sedation Sedation Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about secobarbital.

See also: Seconal Sodium side effects (in more detail)


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