Mega-C


Generic Name: ascorbic acid (Oral route)

as-KORE-bik AS-id

Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

Ascocid C-500 Cecon Cemill 1000 Cemill 500 Cevi-Bid C-Time w/Rose Hips Mega-C One-Gram C Protexin Sunkist Vitamin C

In Canada

Ce-Vi-Sol Revitalose-C-1000 Revitonus C-1000 Yellow Ampule Vitamin C Powder

Available Dosage Forms:

Tablet Powder Powder for Solution Capsule, Liquid Filled Tablet, Chewable Granule Capsule Syrup Powder for Suspension Liquid Solution Tablet, Extended Release Lozenge/Troche Capsule, Extended Release Wafer

Therapeutic Class: Nutritive Agent

Pharmacologic Class: Vitamin C

Uses For Mega-C

Vitamins are compounds that you must have for growth and health. They are needed in small amounts only and are usually available in the foods that you eat. Ascorbic acid, also known as vitamin C, is necessary for wound healing. It is needed for many functions in the body, including helping the body use carbohydrates, fats, and protein. Vitamin C also strengthens blood vessel walls.

Lack of vitamin C can lead to a condition called scurvy, which causes muscle weakness, swollen and bleeding gums, loss of teeth, and bleeding under the skin, as well as tiredness and depression. Wounds also do not heal easily. Your health care professional may treat scurvy by prescribing vitamin C for you.

Some conditions may increase your need for vitamin C. These include:

AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome) Alcoholism Burns Cancer Diarrhea (prolonged) Fever (prolonged) Infection (prolonged) Intestinal diseases Overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism) Stomach ulcer Stress (continuing) Surgical removal of stomach Tuberculosis

Also, the following groups of people may have a deficiency of vitamin C:

Infants receiving unfortified formulas Smokers Patients using an artificial kidney (on hemodialysis) Patients who undergo surgery Individuals who are exposed to long periods of cold temperatures

Increased need for vitamin C should be determined by your health care professional.

Vitamin C may be used for other conditions as determined by your health care professional.

Claims that vitamin C is effective for preventing senility and the common cold, and for treating asthma, some mental problems, cancer, hardening of the arteries, allergies, eye ulcers, blood clots, gum disease, and pressure sores have not been proven. Although vitamin C is being used to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and certain types of cancer, there is not enough information to show that these uses are effective.

Injectable vitamin C is given by or under the supervision of a health care professional. Other forms of vitamin C are available without a prescription.

Once a medicine or dietary supplement has been approved for marketing for a certain use, experience may show that it is also useful for other medical problems. Although these uses are not included in product labeling, vitamin C is used in certain patients with the following medical conditions:

Overdose of iron (to help another drug in decreasing iron levels in the body) Methemoglobinemia (a blood disease) Importance of Diet

For good health, it is important that you eat a balanced and varied diet. Follow carefully any diet program your health care professional may recommend. For your specific dietary vitamin and/or mineral needs, ask your health care professional for a list of appropriate foods. If you think that you are not getting enough vitamins and/or minerals in your diet, you may choose to take a dietary supplement.

Vitamin C is found in various foods, including citrus fruits (oranges, lemons, grapefruit), green vegetables (peppers, broccoli, cabbage), tomatoes, and potatoes. It is best to eat fresh fruits and vegetables whenever possible since they contain the most vitamins. Food processing may destroy some of the vitamins. For example, exposure to air, drying, salting, or cooking (especially in copper pots), mincing of fresh vegetables, or mashing potatoes may reduce the amount of vitamin C in foods. Freezing does not usually cause loss of vitamin C unless foods are stored for a very long time.

Vitamins alone will not take the place of a good diet and will not provide energy. Your body also needs other substances found in food such as protein, minerals, carbohydrates, and fat. Vitamins themselves often cannot work without the presence of other foods.

The daily amount of vitamin C needed is defined in several different ways.

For U.S.— Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs) are the amount of vitamins and minerals needed to provide for adequate nutrition in most healthy persons. RDAs for a given nutrient may vary depending on a person's age, sex, and physical condition (e.g., pregnancy). Daily Values (DVs) are used on food and dietary supplement labels to indicate the percent of the recommended daily amount of each nutrient that a serving provides. DV replaces the previous designation of United States Recommended Daily Allowances (USRDAs). For Canada— Recommended Nutrient Intakes (RNIs) are used to determine the amounts of vitamins, minerals, and protein needed to provide adequate nutrition and lessen the risk of chronic disease.

Normal daily recommended intakes for vitamin C are generally defined as follows:

Persons U.S.
(mg) Canada
(mg) Infants and children
Birth to 3 years of age 30–40 20 4 to 6 years of age 45 25 7 to 10 years of age 45 25 Adolescent and adult males 50–60 25–40 Adolescent and adult females 50–60 25–30 Pregnant females 70 30–40 Breast-feeding females 90–95 55 Smokers 100 45–60 Before Using Mega-C

If you are taking this dietary supplement without a prescription, carefully read and follow any precautions on the label. For this supplement, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Problems in children have not been reported with intake of normal daily recommended amounts.

Geriatric

Problems in older adults have not been reported with intake of normal daily recommended amounts.

Pregnancy Pregnancy Category Explanation All Trimesters C Animal studies have shown an adverse effect and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR no animal studies have been conducted and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women. Breast Feeding

Studies in women suggest that this medication poses minimal risk to the infant when used during breastfeeding.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are receiving this dietary supplement, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using this dietary supplement with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

Amygdalin Deferoxamine

Using this dietary supplement with any of the following medicines may cause an increased risk of certain side effects, but using both drugs may be the best treatment for you. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

Indinavir Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of this dietary supplement. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

Blood problems—High doses of vitamin C may cause certain blood problems Type 2 diabetes mellitus—Very high doses of vitamin C may interfere with tests for sugar in the urine Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency—High doses of vitamin C may cause hemolytic anemia Kidney stones (history of)—High doses of vitamin C may increase risk of kidney stones in the urinary tract Proper Use of ascorbic acid

This section provides information on the proper use of a number of products that contain ascorbic acid. It may not be specific to Mega-C. Please read with care.

Dosing

The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

For oral dosage form (capsules, tablets, oral solution, syrup): To prevent deficiency, the amount taken by mouth is based on normal daily recommended intakes: For the U.S. Adult and teenage males—50 to 60 milligrams (mg) per day. Adult and teenage females—50 to 60 mg per day. Pregnant females—70 mg per day. Breast-feeding females—90 to 95 mg per day. Smokers—100 mg per day. Children 4 to 10 years of age—45 mg per day. Children birth to 3 years of age—30 to 40 mg per day. For Canada Adult and teenage males—25 to 40 mg per day. Adult and teenage females—25 to 30 mg per day. Pregnant females—30 to 40 mg per day. Breast-feeding females—55 mg per day. Smokers—45 to 60 mg per day. Children 4 to 10 years of age—25 mg per day. Children birth to 3 years of age—20 mg per day. To treat deficiency: Adults and teenagers—Treatment dose is determined by prescriber for each individual based on the severity of deficiency. The following dose has been determined for scurvy: 500 mg a day for at least 2 weeks. Children—Treatment dose is determined by prescriber for each individual based on the severity of deficiency. The following dose has been determined for scurvy: 100 to 300 mg a day for at least 2 weeks.

For those individuals taking the oral liquid form of vitamin C:

This preparation is to be taken by mouth even though it comes in a dropper bottle. This dietary supplement may be dropped directly into the mouth or mixed with cereal, fruit juice, or other food. Missed Dose

If you miss a dose of this medicine, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not double doses.

If you miss taking a vitamin for one or more days there is no cause for concern, since it takes some time for your body to become seriously low in vitamins.

Storage

Store the dietary supplement in a closed container at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and direct light. Keep from freezing.

Keep out of the reach of children.

Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed.

Precautions While Using Mega-C

Vitamin C is not stored in the body. If you take more than you need, the extra vitamin C will pass into your urine. Very large doses may also interfere with tests for sugar in diabetics and with tests for blood in the stool.

Mega-C Side Effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor as soon as possible if any of the following side effects occur:

Less common or rare - with high doses Side or lower back pain

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

Less common or rare - with high doses Diarrhea dizziness or faintness (with the injection only) flushing or redness of skin headache increase in urination (mild) nausea or vomiting stomach cramps

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Mega-C side effects (in more detail)

The information contained in the Thomson Reuters Micromedex products as delivered by Drugs.com is intended as an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment. It is not a substitute for a medical exam, nor does it replace the need for services provided by medical professionals. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before taking any prescription or over the counter drugs (including any herbal medicines or supplements) or following any treatment or regimen. Only your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist can provide you with advice on what is safe and effective for you.

The use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products is at your sole risk. These products are provided "AS IS" and "as available" for use, without warranties of any kind, either express or implied. Thomson Reuters Healthcare and Drugs.com make no representation or warranty as to the accuracy, reliability, timeliness, usefulness or completeness of any of the information contained in the products. Additionally, THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE MAKES NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTIES AS TO THE OPINIONS OR OTHER SERVICE OR DATA YOU MAY ACCESS, DOWNLOAD OR USE AS A RESULT OF USE OF THE THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS. ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR USE ARE HEREBY EXCLUDED. Thomson Reuters Healthcare does not assume any responsibility or risk for your use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products.

More Mega-C resources Mega-C Side Effects (in more detail) Mega-C Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Mega-C Drug Interactions Mega-C Support Group 0 Reviews for Mega-C - Add your own review/rating Compare Mega-C with other medications Dietary Supplementation Scurvy Urinary Acidification
read more


FYBOGEL PLAIN


1. Name Of The Medicinal Product

Fybogel.

2. Qualitative And Quantitative Composition

Each single dose sachet contains 3.5g ispaghula husk BP.

3. Pharmaceutical Form

Effervescent granules for preparation of an oral suspension

4. Clinical Particulars 4.1 Therapeutic Indications

The treatment of patients requiring a high fibre regimen: for example, for the relief of constipation including constipation in pregnancy and the maintenance of regularity; for the management of bowel function in patients with colostomy, ileostomy, haemorrhoids, anal fissure, chronic diarrhoea associated with diverticular disease, irritable bowel syndrome and ulcerative colitis.

4.2 Posology And Method Of Administration

Fybogel should be stirred into a glass of water and taken as soon as effervescent subsides, preferably after meals.

Adults and children over 12 years:

One sachet morning and evening.

Elderly:

There is no indication the dosage need be modified for the elderly.

Children 6-12 years:

Half to one level 5ml spoonful depending on size and age morning and evening.

Children under 6 years:

To be taken only when prescribed by a doctor. Half to one level 5ml spoonful depending on size and age morning and evening.

4.3 Contraindications

Fybogel is contra-indicated in cases of intestinal obstruction, faecal impaction and colonic atony such as senile mega-colon.

4.4 Special Warnings And Precautions For Use

Due to its aspartame content, Fybogel should not be given to patients with phenylketonuria.

4.5 Interaction With Other Medicinal Products And Other Forms Of Interaction

None known

4.6 Pregnancy And Lactation

Fybogel may be used during pregnancy and lactation since the ispaghula husk is not absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract.

4.7 Effects On Ability To Drive And Use Machines

Not applicable in view of physical mode of action.

4.8 Undesirable Effects

None known

4.9 Overdose

In the event of overdosage conservative measures should be taken. The patient may notice abdominal discomfort and flatulence and attention should be paid to maintaining an adequate fluid intake, particularly if the granules have been taken without water, contrary to administration instructions.

5. Pharmacological Properties 5.1 Pharmacodynamic Properties

Ispaghula husk is capable of absorbing up to 40 times it own weight of water in vitro and part of its activity can be attributed to its action as a simple bulking agent. In addition colonic bacteria are believed to use the hydrated material as a metabolic substrate. This results in an increase in the bacterial cell mass with a consequent softening of the faeces.

5.2 Pharmacokinetic Properties

The mode of action of Fybogel is physical and does not depend on absorption into the systemic circulation.

5.3 Preclinical Safety Data

No preclinical findings relevant to the prescriber have been reported.

6. Pharmaceutical Particulars 6.1 List Of Excipients Potassium bicarbonate USP Sodium bicarbonate Ph Eur Citric acid Ph Eur Riboflavin sodium phosphate Ph Eur Beta-caotene 10 % (E160a) HSE Aspartame Ph Eur Saccharin sodium Ph Eur Polysorbate 80 Ph Eur Silica, colloidal anhydrous Ph Eur 6.2 Incompatibilities

None known

6.3 Shelf Life

Three years

6.4 Special Precautions For Storage

Store below 30°C in a dry place.

6.5 Nature And Contents Of Container

Sachets of paper/aluminium foil/polythene laminate enclosed in a cardboard outer carton.

Pack size(s): Ten or thirty sachets (pack size printed in bold is currently sold).

6.6 Special Precautions For Disposal And Other Handling

No special instructions.

7. Marketing Authorisation Holder

Reckitt Benckiser Healthcare (UK) Limited

Dansom Lane

Hull

HU8 7DS

United Kingdom

8. Marketing Authorisation Number(S)

PL 00063/0023

9. Date Of First Authorisation/Renewal Of The Authorisation

15/01/1990 / 09/06/2003

10. Date Of Revision Of The Text

17/01/2007


read more


Soliris


Generic Name: eculizumab (E kue LIZ oo mab)
Brand Names: Soliris

What is eculizumab?

Eculizumab is a monoclonal antibody that binds to proteins in the blood that can destroy red blood cells in people with a genetic condition that affects the natural defenses of red blood cells.

Eculizumab is used to prevent the breakdown of red blood cells in people with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinemia (PNH).

Eculizumab is also used to treat a rare chronic blood disease called atypical hemolytic (HEEM-oh-LIT-ik yoo-REEM-ik) uremic syndrome.

Eculizumab may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about eculizumab? Do not shake the eculizumab vial (bottle) or you may ruin the medicine. Eculizumab affects your immune system, and using this medication may increase your risk of serious infection such as meningitis. You must be vaccinated against meningococcal infection at least 2 weeks before you start treatment with eculizumab. If you have been vaccinated in the past, you may need a booster dose. Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as severe headache, high fever, chills, stiffness in your neck or back, confusion, sensitivity to bright light, purple spots on the skin, nausea or vomiting, and/or seizure (convulsions). With your medication you will receive a Patient Safety Card listing the symptoms of meningococcal infection. Carry this card with you at all times. Seek emergency medical attention or call your doctor right away if you notice any of these symptoms. You should not use this medication if you are allergic to eculizumab, if you have bacterial meningitis, or if you have not been vaccinated against meningitis.

Before using eculizumab, tell your doctor if you have a fever or any type of infection.

Do not stop using eculizumab without first talking to your doctor. Stopping or interrupting your treatment could cause sudden and serious effects on your red blood cells. This may result in symptoms such as pale skin, easy bruising, confusion, chest pain, blood clots, or kidney problems.

Eculizumab is available only under a special program called Soliris REMS. You must be registered in the program and sign documents stating that you understand the risks and benefits of taking this medication.

What should I discuss with my health care provider before taking eculizumab? Eculizumab affects your immune system, and using this medication may increase your risk of serious infection such as meningitis. Get emergency medical help if you have any signs of meningitis, such as severe headache with fever, confusion, purple spots on the skin, and nausea or vomiting, stiffness in your neck or back, sensitivity to bright light, or a high fever (103 degrees or higher), chills, body aches, and other flu-like symptoms. You must be vaccinated against meningococcal infection at least 2 weeks before you start treatment with eculizumab. If you have been vaccinated in the past, you may need a booster dose. It is best to stay current on all of your vaccinations while you are using eculizumab, and your doctor may recommend other vaccines before or during treatment. You should not use this medication if you are allergic to eculizumab, if you have bacterial meningitis, or if you have not been vaccinated against meningitis.

With your medication you will receive a Patient Safety Card listing the symptoms of meningococcal infection. Carry this card with you at all times. Seek emergency medical attention or call your doctor right away if you notice any of these symptoms.

Eculizumab is available only under a special program called Soliris REMS. You must be registered in the program and sign documents stating that you understand the risks and benefits of taking this medication.

To make sure you can safely use eculizumab, tell your doctor if you have a fever or any type of infection.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether eculizumab will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication. It is not known whether eculizumab passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How is eculizumab given?

Eculizumab is injected into a vein through an IV. You may be shown how to use an IV at home. Do not self-inject this medicine if you do not fully understand how to give the injection and properly dispose of used needles, IV tubing, and other items used to inject the medicine.

Eculizumab is usually given every 7 days for 5 weeks, and then once every 2 weeks thereafter. Follow your doctor's instructions. The medicine must be given slowly through an IV infusion, and can take up to 2 hours to complete.

You may have a reaction to the infusion (when the medicine is injected into the vein). If this happens, you may need to slow down the speed of your IV infusion, and the infusion should not take more than 2 hours to complete. A caregiver or family member should then watch you for at least 1 hour after your injection to make sure you have no further side effects.

Eculizumab must be mixed in an IV bag with a liquid (diluent) before injecting it. If you are using the injections at home, be sure you understand how to properly mix and store the medication.

Do not shake the medication vial (bottle) or you may ruin the medicine. Prepare your dose in a syringe only when you are ready to give yourself an injection. Do not use the medication if it has changed colors or has particles in it. Call your doctor for a new prescription. To reduce discomfort from your injection, allow the mixed medicine to reach room temperature before using, but never warm the medicine in hot water or a microwave. You may store the mixture at room temperature but you must use it within 24 hours or throw the mixture away.

Use a disposable needle only once. Throw away used needles in a puncture-proof container (ask your pharmacist where you can get one and how to dispose of it). Keep this container out of the reach of children and pets.

Do not stop using eculizumab without first talking to your doctor. Stopping or interrupting your treatment could cause sudden and serious effects on your red blood cells. This may result in symptoms such as pale skin, easy bruising, confusion, chest pain, blood clots, or kidney problems.

If you stop using eculizumab for any reason, your blood may need to be tested on a regular basis for 8 to 12 weeks. Do not miss any scheduled visits to your doctor during this follow-up period.

Store in the refrigerator. Protect from light and do not freeze. Keep unopened eculizumab vials in their original carton. Throw away any unused vials after the expiration date on the label has passed. What happens if I miss a dose?

Call your doctor for instructions if you miss a dose of this medication.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. What should I avoid while taking eculizumab?

Follow your doctor's instructions about any restrictions on food, beverages, or activity.

Eculizumab side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

severe headache with fever, confusion, purple spots on the skin, nausea or vomiting, and/or seizure (convulsions);

stiffness in your neck or back;

sensitivity to bright light;

high fever (103 degrees or higher), chills, body aches, flu symptoms;

pain or burning when you urinate;

any signs of a new illness or infection; or

signs that the medication is not working (pale skin, easy bruising, weakness, dark urine, feeling short of breath, or sudden numbness, severe headache, deep leg pain, or problems with vision, speech, or balance).

Less serious side effects may include:

nausea;

diarrhea;

mild headache;

runny nose, sore throat; or

back pain.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect eculizumab?

There may be other drugs that can interact with eculizumab. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Soliris resources Soliris Side Effects (in more detail) Soliris Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Soliris Drug Interactions Soliris Support Group 0 Reviews for Soliris - Add your own review/rating Soliris Prescribing Information (FDA) Soliris Monograph (AHFS DI) Soliris Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Soliris Consumer Overview Soliris MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Eculizumab Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Compare Soliris with other medications Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Myasthenia Gravis Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about eculizumab.

See also: Soliris side effects (in more detail)


read more


abacavir and lamivudine


Generic Name: abacavir and lamivudine (a BAK a veer and la MIV yoo deen)
Brand Names: Epzicom

What is abacavir and lamivudine?

Abacavir and lamivudine is an antiviral medication. It is in a group of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) medicines called reverse transcriptase inhibitors. Abacavir and lamivudine helps keep the HIV virus from reproducing in the body.

Abacavir and lamivudine is used to treat HIV, which causes the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Abacavir and lamivudine is not a cure for HIV or AIDS.

Abacavir and lamivudine may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about abacavir and lamivudine? Stop using this medication and call your doctor at once if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: fever; rash; nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, stomach pain; general tiredness, body aches; shortness of breath, cough, sore throat. Once you have had an allergic reaction to abacavir and lamivudine, you must never use it again.

Before taking abacavir and lamivudine, tell your doctor if you have kidney disease, heart disease, high blood pressure, or a risk factor for heart disease such as smoking, diabetes, or high cholesterol.

You may need a blood test before you start taking abacavir and lamivudine for the first time, or if you are restarting the medication after stopping for reasons not related to an allergic reaction.

Read the Warning Card that comes with this medication, and carry it with you at all times so you will know the symptoms of allergic reaction to watch for.

Some people develop lactic acidosis while taking abacavir and lamivudine. Early symptoms may get worse over time and this condition can be fatal. Get emergency medical help if you have even mild symptoms such as: muscle pain or weakness, numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs, trouble breathing, stomach pain, nausea with vomiting, fast or uneven heart rate, dizziness, or feeling very weak or tired. Do not allow this medicine to run out completely before you get your prescription refilled. If you miss several doses, you could have a dangerous or even fatal allergic reaction when you start taking the medicine again. If you stop taking abacavir and lamivudine for any reason, talk to your doctor before you start taking the medication again. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking abacavir and lamivudine? You should not take abacavir and lamivudine if you have liver disease. Do not take this medicine if you have ever had an allergic reaction to abacavir. Tell your doctor if you have had an allergic reaction to any medicine that contains abacavir, such as Trizivir or Ziagen. Once you have had an allergic reaction to abacavir and lamivudine, you must never use it again.

You may need a blood test before you start taking abacavir and lamivudine for the first time, or if you are restarting the medication after stopping for reasons not related to an allergic reaction.

Some people develop a life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis while taking abacavir and lamivudine. You may be more likely to develop lactic acidosis if you are overweight or have liver disease, if you are a woman, or if you have taken HIV or AIDS medications for a long time. Talk with your doctor about your individual risk.

To make sure you can safely take abacavir and lamivudine, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

kidney disease;

heart disease or high blood pressure; or

a risk factor for heart disease such as smoking, diabetes, or high cholesterol.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether abacavir and lamivudine will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication. HIV can be passed to your baby if you are not properly treated during pregnancy. Take all of your HIV medicines as directed to control your infection. Women with HIV or AIDS should not breast-feed a baby. Even if your baby is born without HIV, the virus may be passed to the baby in your breast milk. This medication should not be given to children under 18 years old. How should I take abacavir and lamivudine?

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

You may take abacavir and lamivudine with or without food.

This medicine comes with a Medication Guide and a Warning Card that lists the symptoms of an allergic reaction. Read this information carefully and carry the Warning Card with you at all times so you will know what symptoms to watch for.

HIV/AIDS is usually treated with a combination of drugs. Use all medications as directed by your doctor. Read the medication guide or patient instructions provided with each medication. Do not change your doses or medication schedule without your doctor's advice. Every person with HIV or AIDS should remain under the care of a doctor.

If you have hepatitis B you may develop liver symptoms after you stop taking this medication, even months after stopping. Your doctor may want to check your liver function for several months after you stop using abacavir and lamivudine. Visit your doctor regularly.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

See also: Abacavir and lamivudine dosage (in more detail)

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

Do not allow this medicine to run out completely before you get your prescription refilled. It is important that you not stop taking the medicine once you have started. If you miss several doses, you may have a dangerous or even fatal allergic reaction once you start taking abacavir again. If you stop taking abacavir and lamivudine for any reason, talk to your doctor before you start taking the medication again. What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. What should I avoid while taking abacavir and lamivudine? Avoid taking other medications that contain abacavir or lamivudine, such as Combivir, Epivir, Trizivir, or Ziagen. Taking this medication will not prevent you from passing HIV to other people. Avoid having unprotected sex or sharing razors or toothbrushes. Talk with your doctor about safe ways to prevent HIV transmission during sex. Sharing drug or medicine needles is never safe, even for a healthy person. Abacavir and lamivudine side effects Stop using this medication and call your doctor at once if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction to abacavir:

Group 1 - fever;

Group 2 - rash;

Group 3 - nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, stomach pain;

Group 4 - general tiredness, body aches;

Group 5 - shortness of breath, cough, sore throat.

Once you have had an allergic reaction to abacavir, you must never use it again. If you stop taking abacavir and lamivudine for any reason, talk to your doctor before you start taking the medication again. Other serious side effects that may not be signs of an allergic reaction include:

stomach pain, low fever, lost appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);

lactic acidosis - muscle pain or weakness, numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs, trouble breathing, stomach pain, nausea with vomiting, fast or uneven heart rate, dizziness, or feeling very weak or tired;

fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms; or

white patches or sores inside your mouth or on your lips.

Less serious side effects include:

changes in the shape or location of body fat (especially in your arms, legs, face, neck, breasts, and trunk);

sleep problems or strange dreams;

headache, depression, anxiety; or

mild diarrhea.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Abacavir and lamivudine Dosing Information

Usual Adult Dose for HIV Infection:

1 tablet orally once every 24 hours

Usual Adult Dose for Nonoccupational Exposure:

1 tablet orally once every 24 hours
Duration: Prophylaxis should be initiated as soon as possible, within 72 hours of exposure, and continued for 28 days.
In general, the alternative regimens recommended for nonoccupational postexposure HIV prophylaxis include abacavir-lamivudine as part of nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based, protease inhibitor (PI)-based, or triple nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) regimens.

What other drugs will affect abacavir and lamivudine?

Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use, especially:

methadone (Methadose, Dolophine);

ribavirin (Copegus, Rebetron, Virazole);

interferon (Rebetron, Roferon, Intron, Alferon, Infergen, Avonex, Rebif, Betaseron, Actimune); or

other medications that contain abacavir or lamivudine (Combivir, Epivir, Trizivir, Ziagen).

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with abacavir and lamivudine. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More abacavir and lamivudine resources Abacavir and lamivudine Side Effects (in more detail) Abacavir and lamivudine Dosage Abacavir and lamivudine Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Abacavir and lamivudine Drug Interactions Abacavir and lamivudine Support Group 1 Review for Abacavir and lamivudine - Add your own review/rating Compare abacavir and lamivudine with other medications HIV Infection Nonoccupational Exposure Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about abacavir and lamivudine.

See also: abacavir and lamivudine side effects (in more detail)


read more


Westrim


Generic Name: phenylpropanolamine (fen ill proe pa NOLE a meen)
Brand Names: Acutrim 16 Hour, Acutrim II, Maximum Strength, Acutrim Late Day, Control, Dexatrim, Empro, Mega-Trim, Phenyldrine, Propagest, Propan, Rhindecon, Westrim, Westrim LA

What is Westrim (phenylpropanolamine)?

Phenylpropanolamine is a decongestant. It works by constricting (shrinking) blood vessels (veins and arteries) in your body. Constriction of blood vessels in your sinuses, nose, and chest allows drainage of those areas, which decreases congestion.

Phenylpropanolamine is used to treat the congestion associated with allergies, hay fever, sinus irritation, and the common cold. Phenylpropanolamine also causes a decrease in appetite and is used in some over-the-counter diet aids.

Phenylpropanolamine has been associated with an increased risk of hemorrhagic stroke (bleeding into the brain or into tissue surrounding the brain) in women. Men may also be at risk. Although the risk of hemorrhagic stroke is low, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommends that consumers not use any products that contain phenylpropanolamine.

Phenylpropanolamine may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Westrim (phenylpropanolamine)?

Phenylpropanolamine has been associated with an increased risk of hemorrhagic stroke (bleeding into the brain or into tissue surrounding the brain) in women. Men may also be at risk. Although the risk of hemorrhagic stroke is low, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommends that consumers not use any products that contain phenylpropanolamine.

Do not take phenylpropanolamine for longer than 7 days if your condition does not improve or if your symptoms are accompanied by a high fever.

Do not take more of this medication than is recommended on the package or by your doctor. Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Phenylpropanolamine may cause dizziness or drowsiness. If you experience dizziness or drowsiness, avoid these activities. Who should not take Westrim (phenylpropanolamine)?

Do not take phenylpropanolamine if you have taken a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) in the last 14 days. A very dangerous drug interaction could occur, leading to serious side effects.

Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you have

high blood pressure;

any type of heart disease, hardening of the arteries, or irregular heartbeat;

thyroid problems;

diabetes;

glaucoma or increased pressure in your eye;

an enlarged prostate or difficulty urinating; or

liver or kidney disease.

You may not be able to take phenylpropanolamine, or you may require a lower dose or special monitoring during treatment if you have any of the conditions listed above.

It is not known whether phenylpropanolamine will harm an unborn baby. Do not take this medication without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant. Infants are especially sensitive to the effects of phenylpropanolamine. Do not take this drug if you are breast-feeding a baby. If you are over 60 years of age, you may be more likely to experience side effects from phenylpropanolamine. You may require a lower dose of this medication. Using a short-acting formulation of phenylpropanolamine (not a long-acting or a controlled-release formulation) may be safer if you are over 60 years of age. How should I take Westrim (phenylpropanolamine)?

Take phenylpropanolamine exactly as directed by your doctor, or follow the instructions that accompany the package. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you.

Take each dose with a full glass of water. Never take this medication in larger doses or more often than is recommended. Too much phenylpropanolamine could be very harmful.

If your symptoms are accompanied by a high fever, or if they do not improve in 7 days, see your doctor.

Store phenylpropanolamine at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take only your next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose of this medication.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention.

Symptoms of a phenylpropanolamine overdose include extreme tiredness, sweating, dizziness, a slow heart beat, and a coma.

What should I avoid while taking Westrim (phenylpropanolamine)? Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Phenylpropanolamine may cause dizziness or drowsiness. If you experience dizziness or drowsiness, avoid these activities. Never take this medication in larger doses or more often than is recommended. Too much phenylpropanolamine could be very harmful. Westrim (phenylpropanolamine) side effects

If you experience any of the following serious side effects from this medication, stop taking phenylpropanolamine and seek emergency medical attention:

an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, tongue, or face; or hives);

seizures;

unusual behavior or hallucinations; or

an irregular or fast heartbeat.

Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take phenylpropanolamine and talk to your doctor if you experience

dizziness, lightheadedness, or drowsiness;

headache;

insomnia;

anxiety;

tremor (shaking) or restlessness;

nausea or vomiting; or

sweating.

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome.

What other drugs will affect Westrim (phenylpropanolamine)?

Do not take phenylpropanolamine if you have taken a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) in the last 14 days. A very dangerous drug interaction could occur, leading to serious side effects.

Phenylpropanolamine may also interact with the following medicines:

furazolidone (Furoxone);

guanethidine (Ismelin);

indomethacin (Indocin);

methyldopa (Aldomet);

bromocriptine (Parlodel);

caffeine in cola, tea, coffee, chocolate, and other products;

theophylline (Theo-Dur, Theochron, Theolair, others);

tricyclic antidepressants such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Endep), doxepin (Sinequan), and nortriptyline (Pamelor); other commonly used tricyclic antidepressants, including amoxapine (Asendin), clomipramine (Anafranil), desipramine (Norpramin), imipramine (Tofranil), protriptyline (Vivactil), and trimipramine (Surmontil); phenothiazines such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), thioridazine (Mellaril), and prochlorperazine (Compazine); and other commonly used phenothiazines, including fluphenazine (Prolixin), perphenazine (Trilafon), mesoridazine (Serentil), and trifluoperazine (Stelazine).

Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with phenylpropanolamine. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines.

More Westrim resources Westrim Side Effects (in more detail) Westrim Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Westrim Drug Interactions Westrim Support Group 0 Reviews for Westrim - Add your own review/rating Propantheline Bromide Monograph (AHFS DI) Compare Westrim with other medications Nasal Congestion Weight Loss Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has more information about phenylpropanolamine written for health professionals that you may read. What does my medication look like?

Phenylpropanolamine is available over the counter under the brand name Propagest, and with a prescription under the brand name Rhindecon. Other brand or generic formulations may also be available. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about this medication, especially if it is new to you.

Propagest 25 mg--oval, white, scored tablets

Rhindecon 75 mg--timed-release capsules

See also: Westrim side effects (in more detail)


read more


Westrim LA


Generic Name: phenylpropanolamine (fen ill proe pa NOLE a meen)
Brand Names: Acutrim 16 Hour, Acutrim II, Maximum Strength, Acutrim Late Day, Control, Dexatrim, Empro, Mega-Trim, Phenyldrine, Propagest, Propan, Rhindecon, Westrim, Westrim LA

What is Westrim LA (phenylpropanolamine)?

Phenylpropanolamine is a decongestant. It works by constricting (shrinking) blood vessels (veins and arteries) in your body. Constriction of blood vessels in your sinuses, nose, and chest allows drainage of those areas, which decreases congestion.

Phenylpropanolamine is used to treat the congestion associated with allergies, hay fever, sinus irritation, and the common cold. Phenylpropanolamine also causes a decrease in appetite and is used in some over-the-counter diet aids.

Phenylpropanolamine has been associated with an increased risk of hemorrhagic stroke (bleeding into the brain or into tissue surrounding the brain) in women. Men may also be at risk. Although the risk of hemorrhagic stroke is low, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommends that consumers not use any products that contain phenylpropanolamine.

Phenylpropanolamine may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Westrim LA (phenylpropanolamine)?

Phenylpropanolamine has been associated with an increased risk of hemorrhagic stroke (bleeding into the brain or into tissue surrounding the brain) in women. Men may also be at risk. Although the risk of hemorrhagic stroke is low, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommends that consumers not use any products that contain phenylpropanolamine.

Do not take phenylpropanolamine for longer than 7 days if your condition does not improve or if your symptoms are accompanied by a high fever.

Do not take more of this medication than is recommended on the package or by your doctor. Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Phenylpropanolamine may cause dizziness or drowsiness. If you experience dizziness or drowsiness, avoid these activities. Who should not take Westrim LA (phenylpropanolamine)?

Do not take phenylpropanolamine if you have taken a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) in the last 14 days. A very dangerous drug interaction could occur, leading to serious side effects.

Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you have

high blood pressure;

any type of heart disease, hardening of the arteries, or irregular heartbeat;

thyroid problems;

diabetes;

glaucoma or increased pressure in your eye;

an enlarged prostate or difficulty urinating; or

liver or kidney disease.

You may not be able to take phenylpropanolamine, or you may require a lower dose or special monitoring during treatment if you have any of the conditions listed above.

It is not known whether phenylpropanolamine will harm an unborn baby. Do not take this medication without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant. Infants are especially sensitive to the effects of phenylpropanolamine. Do not take this drug if you are breast-feeding a baby. If you are over 60 years of age, you may be more likely to experience side effects from phenylpropanolamine. You may require a lower dose of this medication. Using a short-acting formulation of phenylpropanolamine (not a long-acting or a controlled-release formulation) may be safer if you are over 60 years of age. How should I take Westrim LA (phenylpropanolamine)?

Take phenylpropanolamine exactly as directed by your doctor, or follow the instructions that accompany the package. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you.

Take each dose with a full glass of water. Never take this medication in larger doses or more often than is recommended. Too much phenylpropanolamine could be very harmful.

If your symptoms are accompanied by a high fever, or if they do not improve in 7 days, see your doctor.

Store phenylpropanolamine at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take only your next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose of this medication.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention.

Symptoms of a phenylpropanolamine overdose include extreme tiredness, sweating, dizziness, a slow heart beat, and a coma.

What should I avoid while taking Westrim LA (phenylpropanolamine)? Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Phenylpropanolamine may cause dizziness or drowsiness. If you experience dizziness or drowsiness, avoid these activities. Never take this medication in larger doses or more often than is recommended. Too much phenylpropanolamine could be very harmful. Westrim LA (phenylpropanolamine) side effects

If you experience any of the following serious side effects from this medication, stop taking phenylpropanolamine and seek emergency medical attention:

an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, tongue, or face; or hives);

seizures;

unusual behavior or hallucinations; or

an irregular or fast heartbeat.

Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take phenylpropanolamine and talk to your doctor if you experience

dizziness, lightheadedness, or drowsiness;

headache;

insomnia;

anxiety;

tremor (shaking) or restlessness;

nausea or vomiting; or

sweating.

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome.

What other drugs will affect Westrim LA (phenylpropanolamine)?

Do not take phenylpropanolamine if you have taken a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) in the last 14 days. A very dangerous drug interaction could occur, leading to serious side effects.

Phenylpropanolamine may also interact with the following medicines:

furazolidone (Furoxone);

guanethidine (Ismelin);

indomethacin (Indocin);

methyldopa (Aldomet);

bromocriptine (Parlodel);

caffeine in cola, tea, coffee, chocolate, and other products;

theophylline (Theo-Dur, Theochron, Theolair, others);

tricyclic antidepressants such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Endep), doxepin (Sinequan), and nortriptyline (Pamelor); other commonly used tricyclic antidepressants, including amoxapine (Asendin), clomipramine (Anafranil), desipramine (Norpramin), imipramine (Tofranil), protriptyline (Vivactil), and trimipramine (Surmontil); phenothiazines such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), thioridazine (Mellaril), and prochlorperazine (Compazine); and other commonly used phenothiazines, including fluphenazine (Prolixin), perphenazine (Trilafon), mesoridazine (Serentil), and trifluoperazine (Stelazine).

Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with phenylpropanolamine. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines.

More Westrim LA resources Westrim LA Side Effects (in more detail) Westrim LA Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Westrim LA Drug Interactions Westrim LA Support Group 0 Reviews for Westrim LA - Add your own review/rating Propantheline Bromide Monograph (AHFS DI) Compare Westrim LA with other medications Nasal Congestion Weight Loss Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has more information about phenylpropanolamine written for health professionals that you may read. What does my medication look like?

Phenylpropanolamine is available over the counter under the brand name Propagest, and with a prescription under the brand name Rhindecon. Other brand or generic formulations may also be available. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about this medication, especially if it is new to you.

Propagest 25 mg--oval, white, scored tablets

Rhindecon 75 mg--timed-release capsules

See also: Westrim LA side effects (in more detail)


read more


Acutrim II, Maximum Strength


Generic Name: phenylpropanolamine (fen ill proe pa NOLE a meen)
Brand Names: Acutrim 16 Hour, Acutrim II, Maximum Strength, Acutrim Late Day, Control, Dexatrim, Empro, Mega-Trim, Phenyldrine, Propagest, Propan, Rhindecon, Westrim, Westrim LA

What is Acutrim II, Maximum Strength (phenylpropanolamine)?

Phenylpropanolamine is a decongestant. It works by constricting (shrinking) blood vessels (veins and arteries) in your body. Constriction of blood vessels in your sinuses, nose, and chest allows drainage of those areas, which decreases congestion.

Phenylpropanolamine is used to treat the congestion associated with allergies, hay fever, sinus irritation, and the common cold. Phenylpropanolamine also causes a decrease in appetite and is used in some over-the-counter diet aids.

Phenylpropanolamine has been associated with an increased risk of hemorrhagic stroke (bleeding into the brain or into tissue surrounding the brain) in women. Men may also be at risk. Although the risk of hemorrhagic stroke is low, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommends that consumers not use any products that contain phenylpropanolamine.

Phenylpropanolamine may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Acutrim II, Maximum Strength (phenylpropanolamine)?

Phenylpropanolamine has been associated with an increased risk of hemorrhagic stroke (bleeding into the brain or into tissue surrounding the brain) in women. Men may also be at risk. Although the risk of hemorrhagic stroke is low, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommends that consumers not use any products that contain phenylpropanolamine.

Do not take phenylpropanolamine for longer than 7 days if your condition does not improve or if your symptoms are accompanied by a high fever.

Do not take more of this medication than is recommended on the package or by your doctor. Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Phenylpropanolamine may cause dizziness or drowsiness. If you experience dizziness or drowsiness, avoid these activities. Who should not take Acutrim II, Maximum Strength (phenylpropanolamine)?

Do not take phenylpropanolamine if you have taken a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) in the last 14 days. A very dangerous drug interaction could occur, leading to serious side effects.

Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you have

high blood pressure;

any type of heart disease, hardening of the arteries, or irregular heartbeat;

thyroid problems;

diabetes;

glaucoma or increased pressure in your eye;

an enlarged prostate or difficulty urinating; or

liver or kidney disease.

You may not be able to take phenylpropanolamine, or you may require a lower dose or special monitoring during treatment if you have any of the conditions listed above.

It is not known whether phenylpropanolamine will harm an unborn baby. Do not take this medication without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant. Infants are especially sensitive to the effects of phenylpropanolamine. Do not take this drug if you are breast-feeding a baby. If you are over 60 years of age, you may be more likely to experience side effects from phenylpropanolamine. You may require a lower dose of this medication. Using a short-acting formulation of phenylpropanolamine (not a long-acting or a controlled-release formulation) may be safer if you are over 60 years of age. How should I take Acutrim II, Maximum Strength (phenylpropanolamine)?

Take phenylpropanolamine exactly as directed by your doctor, or follow the instructions that accompany the package. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you.

Take each dose with a full glass of water. Never take this medication in larger doses or more often than is recommended. Too much phenylpropanolamine could be very harmful.

If your symptoms are accompanied by a high fever, or if they do not improve in 7 days, see your doctor.

Store phenylpropanolamine at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take only your next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose of this medication.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention.

Symptoms of a phenylpropanolamine overdose include extreme tiredness, sweating, dizziness, a slow heart beat, and a coma.

What should I avoid while taking Acutrim II, Maximum Strength (phenylpropanolamine)? Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Phenylpropanolamine may cause dizziness or drowsiness. If you experience dizziness or drowsiness, avoid these activities. Never take this medication in larger doses or more often than is recommended. Too much phenylpropanolamine could be very harmful. Acutrim II, Maximum Strength (phenylpropanolamine) side effects

If you experience any of the following serious side effects from this medication, stop taking phenylpropanolamine and seek emergency medical attention:

an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, tongue, or face; or hives);

seizures;

unusual behavior or hallucinations; or

an irregular or fast heartbeat.

Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take phenylpropanolamine and talk to your doctor if you experience

dizziness, lightheadedness, or drowsiness;

headache;

insomnia;

anxiety;

tremor (shaking) or restlessness;

nausea or vomiting; or

sweating.

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome.

What other drugs will affect Acutrim II, Maximum Strength (phenylpropanolamine)?

Do not take phenylpropanolamine if you have taken a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) in the last 14 days. A very dangerous drug interaction could occur, leading to serious side effects.

Phenylpropanolamine may also interact with the following medicines:

furazolidone (Furoxone);

guanethidine (Ismelin);

indomethacin (Indocin);

methyldopa (Aldomet);

bromocriptine (Parlodel);

caffeine in cola, tea, coffee, chocolate, and other products;

theophylline (Theo-Dur, Theochron, Theolair, others);

tricyclic antidepressants such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Endep), doxepin (Sinequan), and nortriptyline (Pamelor); other commonly used tricyclic antidepressants, including amoxapine (Asendin), clomipramine (Anafranil), desipramine (Norpramin), imipramine (Tofranil), protriptyline (Vivactil), and trimipramine (Surmontil); phenothiazines such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), thioridazine (Mellaril), and prochlorperazine (Compazine); and other commonly used phenothiazines, including fluphenazine (Prolixin), perphenazine (Trilafon), mesoridazine (Serentil), and trifluoperazine (Stelazine).

Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with phenylpropanolamine. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines.

More Acutrim II, Maximum Strength resources Acutrim II, Maximum Strength Side Effects (in more detail) Acutrim II, Maximum Strength Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Acutrim II, Maximum Strength Drug Interactions 0 Reviews for Acutrim II, Maximum Strength - Add your own review/rating Propantheline Bromide Monograph (AHFS DI) Compare Acutrim II, Maximum Strength with other medications Nasal Congestion Weight Loss Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has more information about phenylpropanolamine written for health professionals that you may read. What does my medication look like?

Phenylpropanolamine is available over the counter under the brand name Propagest, and with a prescription under the brand name Rhindecon. Other brand or generic formulations may also be available. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about this medication, especially if it is new to you.

Propagest 25 mg--oval, white, scored tablets

Rhindecon 75 mg--timed-release capsules

See also: Acutrim II, Maximum Strength side effects (in more detail)


read more


Acutrim 16 Hour


Generic Name: phenylpropanolamine (fen ill proe pa NOLE a meen)
Brand Names: Acutrim 16 Hour, Acutrim II, Maximum Strength, Acutrim Late Day, Control, Dexatrim, Empro, Mega-Trim, Phenyldrine, Propagest, Propan, Rhindecon, Westrim, Westrim LA

What is Acutrim 16 Hour (phenylpropanolamine)?

Phenylpropanolamine is a decongestant. It works by constricting (shrinking) blood vessels (veins and arteries) in your body. Constriction of blood vessels in your sinuses, nose, and chest allows drainage of those areas, which decreases congestion.

Phenylpropanolamine is used to treat the congestion associated with allergies, hay fever, sinus irritation, and the common cold. Phenylpropanolamine also causes a decrease in appetite and is used in some over-the-counter diet aids.

Phenylpropanolamine has been associated with an increased risk of hemorrhagic stroke (bleeding into the brain or into tissue surrounding the brain) in women. Men may also be at risk. Although the risk of hemorrhagic stroke is low, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommends that consumers not use any products that contain phenylpropanolamine.

Phenylpropanolamine may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Acutrim 16 Hour (phenylpropanolamine)?

Phenylpropanolamine has been associated with an increased risk of hemorrhagic stroke (bleeding into the brain or into tissue surrounding the brain) in women. Men may also be at risk. Although the risk of hemorrhagic stroke is low, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommends that consumers not use any products that contain phenylpropanolamine.

Do not take phenylpropanolamine for longer than 7 days if your condition does not improve or if your symptoms are accompanied by a high fever.

Do not take more of this medication than is recommended on the package or by your doctor. Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Phenylpropanolamine may cause dizziness or drowsiness. If you experience dizziness or drowsiness, avoid these activities. Who should not take Acutrim 16 Hour (phenylpropanolamine)?

Do not take phenylpropanolamine if you have taken a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) in the last 14 days. A very dangerous drug interaction could occur, leading to serious side effects.

Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you have

high blood pressure;

any type of heart disease, hardening of the arteries, or irregular heartbeat;

thyroid problems;

diabetes;

glaucoma or increased pressure in your eye;

an enlarged prostate or difficulty urinating; or

liver or kidney disease.

You may not be able to take phenylpropanolamine, or you may require a lower dose or special monitoring during treatment if you have any of the conditions listed above.

It is not known whether phenylpropanolamine will harm an unborn baby. Do not take this medication without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant. Infants are especially sensitive to the effects of phenylpropanolamine. Do not take this drug if you are breast-feeding a baby. If you are over 60 years of age, you may be more likely to experience side effects from phenylpropanolamine. You may require a lower dose of this medication. Using a short-acting formulation of phenylpropanolamine (not a long-acting or a controlled-release formulation) may be safer if you are over 60 years of age. How should I take Acutrim 16 Hour (phenylpropanolamine)?

Take phenylpropanolamine exactly as directed by your doctor, or follow the instructions that accompany the package. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you.

Take each dose with a full glass of water. Never take this medication in larger doses or more often than is recommended. Too much phenylpropanolamine could be very harmful.

If your symptoms are accompanied by a high fever, or if they do not improve in 7 days, see your doctor.

Store phenylpropanolamine at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take only your next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose of this medication.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention.

Symptoms of a phenylpropanolamine overdose include extreme tiredness, sweating, dizziness, a slow heart beat, and a coma.

What should I avoid while taking Acutrim 16 Hour (phenylpropanolamine)? Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Phenylpropanolamine may cause dizziness or drowsiness. If you experience dizziness or drowsiness, avoid these activities. Never take this medication in larger doses or more often than is recommended. Too much phenylpropanolamine could be very harmful. Acutrim 16 Hour (phenylpropanolamine) side effects

If you experience any of the following serious side effects from this medication, stop taking phenylpropanolamine and seek emergency medical attention:

an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, tongue, or face; or hives);

seizures;

unusual behavior or hallucinations; or

an irregular or fast heartbeat.

Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take phenylpropanolamine and talk to your doctor if you experience

dizziness, lightheadedness, or drowsiness;

headache;

insomnia;

anxiety;

tremor (shaking) or restlessness;

nausea or vomiting; or

sweating.

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome.

What other drugs will affect Acutrim 16 Hour (phenylpropanolamine)?

Do not take phenylpropanolamine if you have taken a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) in the last 14 days. A very dangerous drug interaction could occur, leading to serious side effects.

Phenylpropanolamine may also interact with the following medicines:

furazolidone (Furoxone);

guanethidine (Ismelin);

indomethacin (Indocin);

methyldopa (Aldomet);

bromocriptine (Parlodel);

caffeine in cola, tea, coffee, chocolate, and other products;

theophylline (Theo-Dur, Theochron, Theolair, others);

tricyclic antidepressants such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Endep), doxepin (Sinequan), and nortriptyline (Pamelor); other commonly used tricyclic antidepressants, including amoxapine (Asendin), clomipramine (Anafranil), desipramine (Norpramin), imipramine (Tofranil), protriptyline (Vivactil), and trimipramine (Surmontil); phenothiazines such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), thioridazine (Mellaril), and prochlorperazine (Compazine); and other commonly used phenothiazines, including fluphenazine (Prolixin), perphenazine (Trilafon), mesoridazine (Serentil), and trifluoperazine (Stelazine).

Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with phenylpropanolamine. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines.

More Acutrim 16 Hour resources Acutrim 16 Hour Side Effects (in more detail) Acutrim 16 Hour Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Acutrim 16 Hour Drug Interactions Acutrim 16 Hour Support Group 0 Reviews for Acutrim6 Hour - Add your own review/rating Propantheline Bromide Monograph (AHFS DI) Compare Acutrim 16 Hour with other medications Nasal Congestion Weight Loss Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has more information about phenylpropanolamine written for health professionals that you may read. What does my medication look like?

Phenylpropanolamine is available over the counter under the brand name Propagest, and with a prescription under the brand name Rhindecon. Other brand or generic formulations may also be available. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about this medication, especially if it is new to you.

Propagest 25 mg--oval, white, scored tablets

Rhindecon 75 mg--timed-release capsules

See also: Acutrim6 Hour side effects (in more detail)


read more


Proplex T


Generic Name: factor IX complex (FAK tor NINE KOM plex)
Brand Names: Bebulin VH, Konyne 80, Profilnine SD, Proplex T

What is Proplex T (factor IX complex)?

Factor IX (nine) is a naturally occurring protein in the blood that helps blood to clot. A lack of clotting factors can cause uncontrolled bleeding, as the blood is unable to clot properly.

Factor IX complex is a combination of four different clotting factors and other proteins. This medication works by temporarily raising levels of these clotting factors in the blood to aid in clotting.

Factor IX complex is used to treat or prevent bleeding episodes in people with hemophilia B. It is also used to control bleeding related to surgery or dentistry in people with hemophilia B.

Factor IX may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Proplex T (factor IX complex)?

Before using factor IX complex, your specific blood clotting disorder must be diagnosed as factor IX or factor VIII (eight) deficiency.

Your doctor may want you to receive a hepatitis vaccination before you start using factor IX complex.

Use this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not use the medication in larger amounts, or use it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the instructions on your prescription label. Always check the strength of the medicine on the label to be sure you are using the correct potency.

Carry an ID card or wear a medical alert bracelet stating that you have hemophilia in case of emergency. Any doctor, dentist, or emergency medical care provider who treats you should know that you have a bleeding or blood-clotting disorder.

Factor IX complex is made from human plasma (part of the blood) and may contain viruses and other infectious agents that can cause disease. Although donated human plasma is screened, tested, and treated to reduce the risk of it containing anything that could cause disease, there is still a small possibility it could transmit disease. Talk with your doctor about the risks and benefits of using this medication.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using Proplex T (factor IX complex)?

Before using factor IX complex, your specific blood clotting disorder must be diagnosed as factor IX or factor VIII (eight) deficiency.

FDA pregnancy category C. This medication may be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether factor IX complex passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Factor IX complex is made from human plasma (part of the blood) and may contain viruses and other infectious agents that can cause disease. Although donated human plasma is screened, tested, and treated to reduce the risk of it containing anything that could cause disease, there is still a small possibility it could transmit disease. Talk with your doctor about the risks and benefits of using this medication.

Your doctor may want you to receive a hepatitis vaccination before you start using factor IX complex. How should I use Proplex T (factor IX complex)?

Use this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not use the medication in larger amounts, or use it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the instructions on your prescription label. Always check the strength of the medicine on the label to be sure you are using the correct potency.

Factor IX complex is given as an injection through a needle placed into a vein. Your doctor, nurse, or other healthcare provider will give you this injection. You may be shown how to use your medicine at home. Do not self-inject this medicine if you do not fully understand how to give the injection and properly dispose of needles, IV tubing, and other items used in giving the medicine.

Always wash your hands before preparing and giving your injection.

Factor IX complex must be mixed with a liquid (diluent) before injecting it. If you store your medicine in the refrigerator, take a medicine and diluent vial out of the refrigerator and allow each to warm to room temperature before mixing them. Do not heat the medicine or diluent.

After mixing, gently swirl the mixture and allow the medicine to completely dissolve.

After mixing the medicine and diluent, the mixture should be kept at room temperature and must be used within 3 hours. Do not put mixed medicine into the refrigerator.

Draw your dose into a syringe only when you are ready to give yourself an injection. Each vial is for one use only. After measuring your dose, throw the vial away, even if there is medicine left in it.

Do not use this medication if it has changed colors or has any particles in it. Call your doctor for a new prescription.

Check your pulse before and during your injection. If your pulse rate changes, slow or stop the injection until your pulse rate returns to normal.

Use each disposable needle only one time. Throw away used needles in a puncture-proof container (ask your pharmacist where you can get one and how to dispose of it). Keep this container out of the reach of children and pets.

Carry an ID card or wear a medical alert bracelet stating that you have hemophilia in case of emergency. Any doctor, dentist, or emergency medical care provider who treats you should know that you have a bleeding or blood-clotting disorder. Store the medication and the diluent in the refrigerator and do not allow them to freeze.

Throw away any leftover medicine and diluent if the expiration date has passed.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Factor IX is sometimes used only as needed, so you may not be on a dosing schedule. If you are using the medication regularly, use the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and use the medicine at your next regularly scheduled time. Do not use extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Call your doctor if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of factor IX complex is not expected to produce life-threatening symptoms.

What should I avoid while using Proplex T (factor IX complex)?

Follow your doctor's instructions about any restrictions on food, beverages, or activity while you are using factor IX complex.

Proplex T (factor IX complex) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; nausea, vomiting; feeling light-headed, fainting; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using this medication and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

cough, chest pain;

weak or shallow breathing;

feeling short of breath;

headache, feeling like you might pass out;

fever, chills, drowsiness, and runny nose followed by skin rash and joint pain 2 weeks later;

nausea, stomach pain, low fever, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);

easy bruising, increased bleeding episodes; or

bleeding from a wound or where the medicine was injected.

Less serious side effects may include:

mild nausea or stomach pain; or

mild tingly or jittery feeling.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Proplex T (factor IX complex)?

There may be other drugs that can affect factor IX complex. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

More Proplex T resources Proplex T Side Effects (in more detail) Proplex T Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Proplex T Drug Interactions Proplex T Support Group 0 Reviews for Proplex T - Add your own review/rating Proplex T MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Proplex T Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Bebulin VH Prescribing Information (FDA) Profilnine SD Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare Proplex T with other medications Factor IX Deficiency Factor VII Deficiency Hemophilia A with Inhibitors Hemophilia B Where can I get more information? Your doctor or pharmacist can provide more information about factor IX.

See also: Proplex T side effects (in more detail)


read more


Helixate FS injection


Generic Name: antihemophilic factor (factor VIII) (injection) (an TEE hee moe FIH lick FAC tor)
Brand Names: Advate rAHF-PFM, Alphanate, Helixate, Helixate FS, Hemofil-M, Humate-P, Koate-DVI, Koate-HP, Kogenate, Kogenate FS, Monarc-M, Monoclate-P, Recombinate, Refacto

What is antihemophilic factor (factor VIII)?

Antihemophilic factor (factor VIII) is a naturally occurring protein in the blood that helps blood to clot. A lack of factor VIII is the cause of hemophilia A.

Antihemophilic factor (factor VIII) is used to treat or prevent bleeding in people with hemophilia A.

Antihemophilic factor (factor VIII) may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about antihemophilic factor (factor VIII)?

Some forms of this medication are made from human plasma (part of the blood) and may contain viruses and other infectious agents that can cause disease. Although donated human plasma is screened, tested, and treated to reduce the risk of it containing anything that could cause disease, there is still a small possibility it could transmit disease. Talk with your doctor about the risks and benefits of using this medication.

Some viruses, such as parovovirus B19 and hepatitis A, may be more difficult to identify or remove from antihemophilic factor (factor VIII). Parovovirus can seriously affect pregnant women and people with weak immune systems. Symptoms of parovovirus B19 infection include fever, chills, runny nose, and drowsiness followed about 2 weeks later by a rash and joint pain. Symptoms of hepatitis A may include several days to weeks of poor appetite, tiredness, and low-grade fever followed by nausea, vomiting, and stomach pain. Dark-colored urine and jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes) may also occur. Contact your doctor if you develop any of these symptoms after treatment with antihemophilic factor (factor VIII).

Carry an ID card or wear a medical alert bracelet stating that you have hemophilia, in case of emergency. Any doctor, dentist, or emergency medical care provider who treats you should know that you have a bleeding disorder.

Your body may develop antibodies to this medication, making it less effective. Contact your doctor if this medicine does not seem to be working as well as before in controlling your bleeding.

If you need to have any type of surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using antihemophilic factor (factor VIII). You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using antihemophilic factor (factor VIII)?

This medication comes in many different strengths. Be sure the strength printed on the medicine bottle label is correct for the dose your doctor has prescribed for you.

Do not use this medication if you have:

a history of allergy to antihemophilic factor; or

a history of allergy to products made with human or animal proteins, especially mouse proteins.

FDA pregnancy category C. This medication may be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether this medication passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Some forms of this medication are made from human plasma (part of the blood) and may contain viruses and other infectious agents that can cause disease. Although donated human plasma is screened, tested, and treated to reduce the risk of it containing anything that could cause disease, there is still a small possibility it could transmit disease. Talk with your doctor about the risks and benefits of using this medication.

Some viruses, such as parovovirus B19 and hepatitis A, may be more difficult to identify or remove from antihemophilic factor (factor VIII). Parovovirus can seriously affect pregnant women and people with weak immune systems. Symptoms of parovovirus B19 infection include fever, chills, runny nose, and drowsiness followed about 2 weeks later by a rash and joint pain. Symptoms of hepatitis A may include several days to weeks of poor appetite, tiredness, and low-grade fever followed by nausea, vomiting, and stomach pain. Dark-colored urine and jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes) may also occur. Contact your doctor if you develop any of these symptoms after treatment with antihemophilic factor (factor VIII).

How should I use antihemophilic factor (factor VIII)?

This medication is given as an injection through a needle placed into a vein. Your doctor, nurse, or other healthcare provider will give your first injection. Then you will be given instructions on how to use your injections at home. Do not use this medicine at home if you do not fully understand how to give the injection and properly dispose of needles and other items used in giving the medicine.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition, your blood will need to be tested on a regular basis. Do not miss any scheduled visits to your doctor.

Carry an ID card or wear a medical alert bracelet stating that you have hemophilia, in case of emergency. Any doctor, dentist, or emergency medical care provider who treats you should know that you have a bleeding disorder.

Your body may develop antibodies to this medication, making it less effective. Contact your doctor if this medicine does not seem to be working as well as before in controlling your bleeding.

If you need to have any type of surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using antihemophilic factor (factor VIII). You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time.

Store the powder medicine in the refrigerator. Do not freeze. Do not mix this medicine with the liquid diluent until you are ready to give the injection. Once the medicine has been mixed, you must use it within 3 hours. Do not refrigerate the mixed medicine. Keep it at room temperature. You may also store the powder at room temperature for up to 6 months or until the expiration date printed on the label (whichever comes first). Do not put the medicine back into the refrigerator once you have kept it at room temperature. What happens if I miss a dose?

Contact your doctor for instructions if you miss a dose of this medication.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. What should I avoid while using antihemophilic factor (factor VIII)?

There are no restrictions on food, beverages, or activity while using this medication unless your doctor has told you otherwise.

Antihemophilic factor (factor VIII) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

nausea, stomach pain, low fever, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);

fever, chills, runny nose, and drowsiness followed about 2 weeks later by a rash and joint pain;

fast heart rate, chest pain, trouble breathing;

feeling light-headed, fainting; or

pain, redness, swelling, or oozing where the medicine was injected.

Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur, such as:

unusual taste in your mouth;

cough, runny or stuffy nose;

mild itching;

swelling in your hands, ankles, or feet;

headache or dizziness;

mild nausea, diarrhea, stomach pain;

sweating;

joint pain; or

chills or flushing (warmth or tingly feeling).

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome.

What other drugs will affect antihemophilic factor (factor VIII)?

Other drugs that affect bleeding or blood-clotting may interact with antihemophilic factor (factor VIII) and cause dangerous side effects or make the medicine less effective.

There may be other drugs that can affect antihemophilic factor (factor VIII). Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has additional information about antihemophilic factor (factor VIII) written for health professionals that you may read. What does my medication look like?

Antihemophilic factor (factor VIII) is available with a prescription under several brand names. Generic formulations may also be available. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about this medication, especially if it is new to you.


read more


Koate-DVI injection


Generic Name: antihemophilic factor (factor VIII) (injection) (an TEE hee moe FIH lick FAC tor)
Brand Names: Advate rAHF-PFM, Alphanate, Helixate, Helixate FS, Hemofil-M, Humate-P, Koate-DVI, Koate-HP, Kogenate, Kogenate FS, Monarc-M, Monoclate-P, Recombinate, Refacto

What is antihemophilic factor (factor VIII)?

Antihemophilic factor (factor VIII) is a naturally occurring protein in the blood that helps blood to clot. A lack of factor VIII is the cause of hemophilia A.

Antihemophilic factor (factor VIII) is used to treat or prevent bleeding in people with hemophilia A.

Antihemophilic factor (factor VIII) may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about antihemophilic factor (factor VIII)?

Some forms of this medication are made from human plasma (part of the blood) and may contain viruses and other infectious agents that can cause disease. Although donated human plasma is screened, tested, and treated to reduce the risk of it containing anything that could cause disease, there is still a small possibility it could transmit disease. Talk with your doctor about the risks and benefits of using this medication.

Some viruses, such as parovovirus B19 and hepatitis A, may be more difficult to identify or remove from antihemophilic factor (factor VIII). Parovovirus can seriously affect pregnant women and people with weak immune systems. Symptoms of parovovirus B19 infection include fever, chills, runny nose, and drowsiness followed about 2 weeks later by a rash and joint pain. Symptoms of hepatitis A may include several days to weeks of poor appetite, tiredness, and low-grade fever followed by nausea, vomiting, and stomach pain. Dark-colored urine and jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes) may also occur. Contact your doctor if you develop any of these symptoms after treatment with antihemophilic factor (factor VIII).

Carry an ID card or wear a medical alert bracelet stating that you have hemophilia, in case of emergency. Any doctor, dentist, or emergency medical care provider who treats you should know that you have a bleeding disorder.

Your body may develop antibodies to this medication, making it less effective. Contact your doctor if this medicine does not seem to be working as well as before in controlling your bleeding.

If you need to have any type of surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using antihemophilic factor (factor VIII). You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using antihemophilic factor (factor VIII)?

This medication comes in many different strengths. Be sure the strength printed on the medicine bottle label is correct for the dose your doctor has prescribed for you.

Do not use this medication if you have:

a history of allergy to antihemophilic factor; or

a history of allergy to products made with human or animal proteins, especially mouse proteins.

FDA pregnancy category C. This medication may be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether this medication passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Some forms of this medication are made from human plasma (part of the blood) and may contain viruses and other infectious agents that can cause disease. Although donated human plasma is screened, tested, and treated to reduce the risk of it containing anything that could cause disease, there is still a small possibility it could transmit disease. Talk with your doctor about the risks and benefits of using this medication.

Some viruses, such as parovovirus B19 and hepatitis A, may be more difficult to identify or remove from antihemophilic factor (factor VIII). Parovovirus can seriously affect pregnant women and people with weak immune systems. Symptoms of parovovirus B19 infection include fever, chills, runny nose, and drowsiness followed about 2 weeks later by a rash and joint pain. Symptoms of hepatitis A may include several days to weeks of poor appetite, tiredness, and low-grade fever followed by nausea, vomiting, and stomach pain. Dark-colored urine and jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes) may also occur. Contact your doctor if you develop any of these symptoms after treatment with antihemophilic factor (factor VIII).

How should I use antihemophilic factor (factor VIII)?

This medication is given as an injection through a needle placed into a vein. Your doctor, nurse, or other healthcare provider will give your first injection. Then you will be given instructions on how to use your injections at home. Do not use this medicine at home if you do not fully understand how to give the injection and properly dispose of needles and other items used in giving the medicine.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition, your blood will need to be tested on a regular basis. Do not miss any scheduled visits to your doctor.

Carry an ID card or wear a medical alert bracelet stating that you have hemophilia, in case of emergency. Any doctor, dentist, or emergency medical care provider who treats you should know that you have a bleeding disorder.

Your body may develop antibodies to this medication, making it less effective. Contact your doctor if this medicine does not seem to be working as well as before in controlling your bleeding.

If you need to have any type of surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using antihemophilic factor (factor VIII). You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time.

Store the powder medicine in the refrigerator. Do not freeze. Do not mix this medicine with the liquid diluent until you are ready to give the injection. Once the medicine has been mixed, you must use it within 3 hours. Do not refrigerate the mixed medicine. Keep it at room temperature. You may also store the powder at room temperature for up to 6 months or until the expiration date printed on the label (whichever comes first). Do not put the medicine back into the refrigerator once you have kept it at room temperature. What happens if I miss a dose?

Contact your doctor for instructions if you miss a dose of this medication.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. What should I avoid while using antihemophilic factor (factor VIII)?

There are no restrictions on food, beverages, or activity while using this medication unless your doctor has told you otherwise.

Antihemophilic factor (factor VIII) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

nausea, stomach pain, low fever, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);

fever, chills, runny nose, and drowsiness followed about 2 weeks later by a rash and joint pain;

fast heart rate, chest pain, trouble breathing;

feeling light-headed, fainting; or

pain, redness, swelling, or oozing where the medicine was injected.

Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur, such as:

unusual taste in your mouth;

cough, runny or stuffy nose;

mild itching;

swelling in your hands, ankles, or feet;

headache or dizziness;

mild nausea, diarrhea, stomach pain;

sweating;

joint pain; or

chills or flushing (warmth or tingly feeling).

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome.

What other drugs will affect antihemophilic factor (factor VIII)?

Other drugs that affect bleeding or blood-clotting may interact with antihemophilic factor (factor VIII) and cause dangerous side effects or make the medicine less effective.

There may be other drugs that can affect antihemophilic factor (factor VIII). Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has additional information about antihemophilic factor (factor VIII) written for health professionals that you may read. What does my medication look like?

Antihemophilic factor (factor VIII) is available with a prescription under several brand names. Generic formulations may also be available. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about this medication, especially if it is new to you.


read more


Kogenate FS injection


Generic Name: antihemophilic factor (factor VIII) (injection) (an TEE hee moe FIH lick FAC tor)
Brand Names: Advate rAHF-PFM, Alphanate, Helixate, Helixate FS, Hemofil-M, Humate-P, Koate-DVI, Koate-HP, Kogenate, Kogenate FS, Monarc-M, Monoclate-P, Recombinate, Refacto

What is antihemophilic factor (factor VIII)?

Antihemophilic factor (factor VIII) is a naturally occurring protein in the blood that helps blood to clot. A lack of factor VIII is the cause of hemophilia A.

Antihemophilic factor (factor VIII) is used to treat or prevent bleeding in people with hemophilia A.

Antihemophilic factor (factor VIII) may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about antihemophilic factor (factor VIII)?

Some forms of this medication are made from human plasma (part of the blood) and may contain viruses and other infectious agents that can cause disease. Although donated human plasma is screened, tested, and treated to reduce the risk of it containing anything that could cause disease, there is still a small possibility it could transmit disease. Talk with your doctor about the risks and benefits of using this medication.

Some viruses, such as parovovirus B19 and hepatitis A, may be more difficult to identify or remove from antihemophilic factor (factor VIII). Parovovirus can seriously affect pregnant women and people with weak immune systems. Symptoms of parovovirus B19 infection include fever, chills, runny nose, and drowsiness followed about 2 weeks later by a rash and joint pain. Symptoms of hepatitis A may include several days to weeks of poor appetite, tiredness, and low-grade fever followed by nausea, vomiting, and stomach pain. Dark-colored urine and jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes) may also occur. Contact your doctor if you develop any of these symptoms after treatment with antihemophilic factor (factor VIII).

Carry an ID card or wear a medical alert bracelet stating that you have hemophilia, in case of emergency. Any doctor, dentist, or emergency medical care provider who treats you should know that you have a bleeding disorder.

Your body may develop antibodies to this medication, making it less effective. Contact your doctor if this medicine does not seem to be working as well as before in controlling your bleeding.

If you need to have any type of surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using antihemophilic factor (factor VIII). You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using antihemophilic factor (factor VIII)?

This medication comes in many different strengths. Be sure the strength printed on the medicine bottle label is correct for the dose your doctor has prescribed for you.

Do not use this medication if you have:

a history of allergy to antihemophilic factor; or

a history of allergy to products made with human or animal proteins, especially mouse proteins.

FDA pregnancy category C. This medication may be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether this medication passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Some forms of this medication are made from human plasma (part of the blood) and may contain viruses and other infectious agents that can cause disease. Although donated human plasma is screened, tested, and treated to reduce the risk of it containing anything that could cause disease, there is still a small possibility it could transmit disease. Talk with your doctor about the risks and benefits of using this medication.

Some viruses, such as parovovirus B19 and hepatitis A, may be more difficult to identify or remove from antihemophilic factor (factor VIII). Parovovirus can seriously affect pregnant women and people with weak immune systems. Symptoms of parovovirus B19 infection include fever, chills, runny nose, and drowsiness followed about 2 weeks later by a rash and joint pain. Symptoms of hepatitis A may include several days to weeks of poor appetite, tiredness, and low-grade fever followed by nausea, vomiting, and stomach pain. Dark-colored urine and jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes) may also occur. Contact your doctor if you develop any of these symptoms after treatment with antihemophilic factor (factor VIII).

How should I use antihemophilic factor (factor VIII)?

This medication is given as an injection through a needle placed into a vein. Your doctor, nurse, or other healthcare provider will give your first injection. Then you will be given instructions on how to use your injections at home. Do not use this medicine at home if you do not fully understand how to give the injection and properly dispose of needles and other items used in giving the medicine.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition, your blood will need to be tested on a regular basis. Do not miss any scheduled visits to your doctor.

Carry an ID card or wear a medical alert bracelet stating that you have hemophilia, in case of emergency. Any doctor, dentist, or emergency medical care provider who treats you should know that you have a bleeding disorder.

Your body may develop antibodies to this medication, making it less effective. Contact your doctor if this medicine does not seem to be working as well as before in controlling your bleeding.

If you need to have any type of surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using antihemophilic factor (factor VIII). You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time.

Store the powder medicine in the refrigerator. Do not freeze. Do not mix this medicine with the liquid diluent until you are ready to give the injection. Once the medicine has been mixed, you must use it within 3 hours. Do not refrigerate the mixed medicine. Keep it at room temperature. You may also store the powder at room temperature for up to 6 months or until the expiration date printed on the label (whichever comes first). Do not put the medicine back into the refrigerator once you have kept it at room temperature. What happens if I miss a dose?

Contact your doctor for instructions if you miss a dose of this medication.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. What should I avoid while using antihemophilic factor (factor VIII)?

There are no restrictions on food, beverages, or activity while using this medication unless your doctor has told you otherwise.

Antihemophilic factor (factor VIII) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

nausea, stomach pain, low fever, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);

fever, chills, runny nose, and drowsiness followed about 2 weeks later by a rash and joint pain;

fast heart rate, chest pain, trouble breathing;

feeling light-headed, fainting; or

pain, redness, swelling, or oozing where the medicine was injected.

Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur, such as:

unusual taste in your mouth;

cough, runny or stuffy nose;

mild itching;

swelling in your hands, ankles, or feet;

headache or dizziness;

mild nausea, diarrhea, stomach pain;

sweating;

joint pain; or

chills or flushing (warmth or tingly feeling).

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome.

What other drugs will affect antihemophilic factor (factor VIII)?

Other drugs that affect bleeding or blood-clotting may interact with antihemophilic factor (factor VIII) and cause dangerous side effects or make the medicine less effective.

There may be other drugs that can affect antihemophilic factor (factor VIII). Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has additional information about antihemophilic factor (factor VIII) written for health professionals that you may read. What does my medication look like?

Antihemophilic factor (factor VIII) is available with a prescription under several brand names. Generic formulations may also be available. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about this medication, especially if it is new to you.


read more


Helixate injection


Generic Name: antihemophilic factor (factor VIII) (injection) (an TEE hee moe FIH lick FAC tor)
Brand Names: Advate rAHF-PFM, Alphanate, Helixate, Helixate FS, Hemofil-M, Humate-P, Koate-DVI, Koate-HP, Kogenate, Kogenate FS, Monarc-M, Monoclate-P, Recombinate, Refacto

What is antihemophilic factor (factor VIII)?

Antihemophilic factor (factor VIII) is a naturally occurring protein in the blood that helps blood to clot. A lack of factor VIII is the cause of hemophilia A.

Antihemophilic factor (factor VIII) is used to treat or prevent bleeding in people with hemophilia A.

Antihemophilic factor (factor VIII) may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about antihemophilic factor (factor VIII)?

Some forms of this medication are made from human plasma (part of the blood) and may contain viruses and other infectious agents that can cause disease. Although donated human plasma is screened, tested, and treated to reduce the risk of it containing anything that could cause disease, there is still a small possibility it could transmit disease. Talk with your doctor about the risks and benefits of using this medication.

Some viruses, such as parovovirus B19 and hepatitis A, may be more difficult to identify or remove from antihemophilic factor (factor VIII). Parovovirus can seriously affect pregnant women and people with weak immune systems. Symptoms of parovovirus B19 infection include fever, chills, runny nose, and drowsiness followed about 2 weeks later by a rash and joint pain. Symptoms of hepatitis A may include several days to weeks of poor appetite, tiredness, and low-grade fever followed by nausea, vomiting, and stomach pain. Dark-colored urine and jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes) may also occur. Contact your doctor if you develop any of these symptoms after treatment with antihemophilic factor (factor VIII).

Carry an ID card or wear a medical alert bracelet stating that you have hemophilia, in case of emergency. Any doctor, dentist, or emergency medical care provider who treats you should know that you have a bleeding disorder.

Your body may develop antibodies to this medication, making it less effective. Contact your doctor if this medicine does not seem to be working as well as before in controlling your bleeding.

If you need to have any type of surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using antihemophilic factor (factor VIII). You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using antihemophilic factor (factor VIII)?

This medication comes in many different strengths. Be sure the strength printed on the medicine bottle label is correct for the dose your doctor has prescribed for you.

Do not use this medication if you have:

a history of allergy to antihemophilic factor; or

a history of allergy to products made with human or animal proteins, especially mouse proteins.

FDA pregnancy category C. This medication may be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether this medication passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Some forms of this medication are made from human plasma (part of the blood) and may contain viruses and other infectious agents that can cause disease. Although donated human plasma is screened, tested, and treated to reduce the risk of it containing anything that could cause disease, there is still a small possibility it could transmit disease. Talk with your doctor about the risks and benefits of using this medication.

Some viruses, such as parovovirus B19 and hepatitis A, may be more difficult to identify or remove from antihemophilic factor (factor VIII). Parovovirus can seriously affect pregnant women and people with weak immune systems. Symptoms of parovovirus B19 infection include fever, chills, runny nose, and drowsiness followed about 2 weeks later by a rash and joint pain. Symptoms of hepatitis A may include several days to weeks of poor appetite, tiredness, and low-grade fever followed by nausea, vomiting, and stomach pain. Dark-colored urine and jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes) may also occur. Contact your doctor if you develop any of these symptoms after treatment with antihemophilic factor (factor VIII).

How should I use antihemophilic factor (factor VIII)?

This medication is given as an injection through a needle placed into a vein. Your doctor, nurse, or other healthcare provider will give your first injection. Then you will be given instructions on how to use your injections at home. Do not use this medicine at home if you do not fully understand how to give the injection and properly dispose of needles and other items used in giving the medicine.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition, your blood will need to be tested on a regular basis. Do not miss any scheduled visits to your doctor.

Carry an ID card or wear a medical alert bracelet stating that you have hemophilia, in case of emergency. Any doctor, dentist, or emergency medical care provider who treats you should know that you have a bleeding disorder.

Your body may develop antibodies to this medication, making it less effective. Contact your doctor if this medicine does not seem to be working as well as before in controlling your bleeding.

If you need to have any type of surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using antihemophilic factor (factor VIII). You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time.

Store the powder medicine in the refrigerator. Do not freeze. Do not mix this medicine with the liquid diluent until you are ready to give the injection. Once the medicine has been mixed, you must use it within 3 hours. Do not refrigerate the mixed medicine. Keep it at room temperature. You may also store the powder at room temperature for up to 6 months or until the expiration date printed on the label (whichever comes first). Do not put the medicine back into the refrigerator once you have kept it at room temperature. What happens if I miss a dose?

Contact your doctor for instructions if you miss a dose of this medication.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. What should I avoid while using antihemophilic factor (factor VIII)?

There are no restrictions on food, beverages, or activity while using this medication unless your doctor has told you otherwise.

Antihemophilic factor (factor VIII) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

nausea, stomach pain, low fever, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);

fever, chills, runny nose, and drowsiness followed about 2 weeks later by a rash and joint pain;

fast heart rate, chest pain, trouble breathing;

feeling light-headed, fainting; or

pain, redness, swelling, or oozing where the medicine was injected.

Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur, such as:

unusual taste in your mouth;

cough, runny or stuffy nose;

mild itching;

swelling in your hands, ankles, or feet;

headache or dizziness;

mild nausea, diarrhea, stomach pain;

sweating;

joint pain; or

chills or flushing (warmth or tingly feeling).

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome.

What other drugs will affect antihemophilic factor (factor VIII)?

Other drugs that affect bleeding or blood-clotting may interact with antihemophilic factor (factor VIII) and cause dangerous side effects or make the medicine less effective.

There may be other drugs that can affect antihemophilic factor (factor VIII). Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has additional information about antihemophilic factor (factor VIII) written for health professionals that you may read. What does my medication look like?

Antihemophilic factor (factor VIII) is available with a prescription under several brand names. Generic formulations may also be available. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about this medication, especially if it is new to you.


read more


Monoclate-P injection


Generic Name: antihemophilic factor (factor VIII) (injection) (an TEE hee moe FIH lick FAC tor)
Brand Names: Advate rAHF-PFM, Alphanate, Helixate, Helixate FS, Hemofil-M, Humate-P, Koate-DVI, Koate-HP, Kogenate, Kogenate FS, Monarc-M, Monoclate-P, Recombinate, Refacto

What is antihemophilic factor (factor VIII)?

Antihemophilic factor (factor VIII) is a naturally occurring protein in the blood that helps blood to clot. A lack of factor VIII is the cause of hemophilia A.

Antihemophilic factor (factor VIII) is used to treat or prevent bleeding in people with hemophilia A.

Antihemophilic factor (factor VIII) may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about antihemophilic factor (factor VIII)?

Some forms of this medication are made from human plasma (part of the blood) and may contain viruses and other infectious agents that can cause disease. Although donated human plasma is screened, tested, and treated to reduce the risk of it containing anything that could cause disease, there is still a small possibility it could transmit disease. Talk with your doctor about the risks and benefits of using this medication.

Some viruses, such as parovovirus B19 and hepatitis A, may be more difficult to identify or remove from antihemophilic factor (factor VIII). Parovovirus can seriously affect pregnant women and people with weak immune systems. Symptoms of parovovirus B19 infection include fever, chills, runny nose, and drowsiness followed about 2 weeks later by a rash and joint pain. Symptoms of hepatitis A may include several days to weeks of poor appetite, tiredness, and low-grade fever followed by nausea, vomiting, and stomach pain. Dark-colored urine and jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes) may also occur. Contact your doctor if you develop any of these symptoms after treatment with antihemophilic factor (factor VIII).

Carry an ID card or wear a medical alert bracelet stating that you have hemophilia, in case of emergency. Any doctor, dentist, or emergency medical care provider who treats you should know that you have a bleeding disorder.

Your body may develop antibodies to this medication, making it less effective. Contact your doctor if this medicine does not seem to be working as well as before in controlling your bleeding.

If you need to have any type of surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using antihemophilic factor (factor VIII). You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using antihemophilic factor (factor VIII)?

This medication comes in many different strengths. Be sure the strength printed on the medicine bottle label is correct for the dose your doctor has prescribed for you.

Do not use this medication if you have:

a history of allergy to antihemophilic factor; or

a history of allergy to products made with human or animal proteins, especially mouse proteins.

FDA pregnancy category C. This medication may be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether this medication passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Some forms of this medication are made from human plasma (part of the blood) and may contain viruses and other infectious agents that can cause disease. Although donated human plasma is screened, tested, and treated to reduce the risk of it containing anything that could cause disease, there is still a small possibility it could transmit disease. Talk with your doctor about the risks and benefits of using this medication.

Some viruses, such as parovovirus B19 and hepatitis A, may be more difficult to identify or remove from antihemophilic factor (factor VIII). Parovovirus can seriously affect pregnant women and people with weak immune systems. Symptoms of parovovirus B19 infection include fever, chills, runny nose, and drowsiness followed about 2 weeks later by a rash and joint pain. Symptoms of hepatitis A may include several days to weeks of poor appetite, tiredness, and low-grade fever followed by nausea, vomiting, and stomach pain. Dark-colored urine and jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes) may also occur. Contact your doctor if you develop any of these symptoms after treatment with antihemophilic factor (factor VIII).

How should I use antihemophilic factor (factor VIII)?

This medication is given as an injection through a needle placed into a vein. Your doctor, nurse, or other healthcare provider will give your first injection. Then you will be given instructions on how to use your injections at home. Do not use this medicine at home if you do not fully understand how to give the injection and properly dispose of needles and other items used in giving the medicine.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition, your blood will need to be tested on a regular basis. Do not miss any scheduled visits to your doctor.

Carry an ID card or wear a medical alert bracelet stating that you have hemophilia, in case of emergency. Any doctor, dentist, or emergency medical care provider who treats you should know that you have a bleeding disorder.

Your body may develop antibodies to this medication, making it less effective. Contact your doctor if this medicine does not seem to be working as well as before in controlling your bleeding.

If you need to have any type of surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using antihemophilic factor (factor VIII). You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time.

Store the powder medicine in the refrigerator. Do not freeze. Do not mix this medicine with the liquid diluent until you are ready to give the injection. Once the medicine has been mixed, you must use it within 3 hours. Do not refrigerate the mixed medicine. Keep it at room temperature. You may also store the powder at room temperature for up to 6 months or until the expiration date printed on the label (whichever comes first). Do not put the medicine back into the refrigerator once you have kept it at room temperature. What happens if I miss a dose?

Contact your doctor for instructions if you miss a dose of this medication.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. What should I avoid while using antihemophilic factor (factor VIII)?

There are no restrictions on food, beverages, or activity while using this medication unless your doctor has told you otherwise.

Antihemophilic factor (factor VIII) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

nausea, stomach pain, low fever, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);

fever, chills, runny nose, and drowsiness followed about 2 weeks later by a rash and joint pain;

fast heart rate, chest pain, trouble breathing;

feeling light-headed, fainting; or

pain, redness, swelling, or oozing where the medicine was injected.

Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur, such as:

unusual taste in your mouth;

cough, runny or stuffy nose;

mild itching;

swelling in your hands, ankles, or feet;

headache or dizziness;

mild nausea, diarrhea, stomach pain;

sweating;

joint pain; or

chills or flushing (warmth or tingly feeling).

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome.

What other drugs will affect antihemophilic factor (factor VIII)?

Other drugs that affect bleeding or blood-clotting may interact with antihemophilic factor (factor VIII) and cause dangerous side effects or make the medicine less effective.

There may be other drugs that can affect antihemophilic factor (factor VIII). Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has additional information about antihemophilic factor (factor VIII) written for health professionals that you may read. What does my medication look like?

Antihemophilic factor (factor VIII) is available with a prescription under several brand names. Generic formulations may also be available. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about this medication, especially if it is new to you.


read more


Humate-P injection


Generic Name: antihemophilic factor (factor VIII) (injection) (an TEE hee moe FIH lick FAC tor)
Brand Names: Advate rAHF-PFM, Alphanate, Helixate, Helixate FS, Hemofil-M, Humate-P, Koate-DVI, Koate-HP, Kogenate, Kogenate FS, Monarc-M, Monoclate-P, Recombinate, Refacto

What is antihemophilic factor (factor VIII)?

Antihemophilic factor (factor VIII) is a naturally occurring protein in the blood that helps blood to clot. A lack of factor VIII is the cause of hemophilia A.

Antihemophilic factor (factor VIII) is used to treat or prevent bleeding in people with hemophilia A.

Antihemophilic factor (factor VIII) may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about antihemophilic factor (factor VIII)?

Some forms of this medication are made from human plasma (part of the blood) and may contain viruses and other infectious agents that can cause disease. Although donated human plasma is screened, tested, and treated to reduce the risk of it containing anything that could cause disease, there is still a small possibility it could transmit disease. Talk with your doctor about the risks and benefits of using this medication.

Some viruses, such as parovovirus B19 and hepatitis A, may be more difficult to identify or remove from antihemophilic factor (factor VIII). Parovovirus can seriously affect pregnant women and people with weak immune systems. Symptoms of parovovirus B19 infection include fever, chills, runny nose, and drowsiness followed about 2 weeks later by a rash and joint pain. Symptoms of hepatitis A may include several days to weeks of poor appetite, tiredness, and low-grade fever followed by nausea, vomiting, and stomach pain. Dark-colored urine and jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes) may also occur. Contact your doctor if you develop any of these symptoms after treatment with antihemophilic factor (factor VIII).

Carry an ID card or wear a medical alert bracelet stating that you have hemophilia, in case of emergency. Any doctor, dentist, or emergency medical care provider who treats you should know that you have a bleeding disorder.

Your body may develop antibodies to this medication, making it less effective. Contact your doctor if this medicine does not seem to be working as well as before in controlling your bleeding.

If you need to have any type of surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using antihemophilic factor (factor VIII). You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using antihemophilic factor (factor VIII)?

This medication comes in many different strengths. Be sure the strength printed on the medicine bottle label is correct for the dose your doctor has prescribed for you.

Do not use this medication if you have:

a history of allergy to antihemophilic factor; or

a history of allergy to products made with human or animal proteins, especially mouse proteins.

FDA pregnancy category C. This medication may be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether this medication passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Some forms of this medication are made from human plasma (part of the blood) and may contain viruses and other infectious agents that can cause disease. Although donated human plasma is screened, tested, and treated to reduce the risk of it containing anything that could cause disease, there is still a small possibility it could transmit disease. Talk with your doctor about the risks and benefits of using this medication.

Some viruses, such as parovovirus B19 and hepatitis A, may be more difficult to identify or remove from antihemophilic factor (factor VIII). Parovovirus can seriously affect pregnant women and people with weak immune systems. Symptoms of parovovirus B19 infection include fever, chills, runny nose, and drowsiness followed about 2 weeks later by a rash and joint pain. Symptoms of hepatitis A may include several days to weeks of poor appetite, tiredness, and low-grade fever followed by nausea, vomiting, and stomach pain. Dark-colored urine and jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes) may also occur. Contact your doctor if you develop any of these symptoms after treatment with antihemophilic factor (factor VIII).

How should I use antihemophilic factor (factor VIII)?

This medication is given as an injection through a needle placed into a vein. Your doctor, nurse, or other healthcare provider will give your first injection. Then you will be given instructions on how to use your injections at home. Do not use this medicine at home if you do not fully understand how to give the injection and properly dispose of needles and other items used in giving the medicine.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition, your blood will need to be tested on a regular basis. Do not miss any scheduled visits to your doctor.

Carry an ID card or wear a medical alert bracelet stating that you have hemophilia, in case of emergency. Any doctor, dentist, or emergency medical care provider who treats you should know that you have a bleeding disorder.

Your body may develop antibodies to this medication, making it less effective. Contact your doctor if this medicine does not seem to be working as well as before in controlling your bleeding.

If you need to have any type of surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using antihemophilic factor (factor VIII). You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time.

Store the powder medicine in the refrigerator. Do not freeze. Do not mix this medicine with the liquid diluent until you are ready to give the injection. Once the medicine has been mixed, you must use it within 3 hours. Do not refrigerate the mixed medicine. Keep it at room temperature. You may also store the powder at room temperature for up to 6 months or until the expiration date printed on the label (whichever comes first). Do not put the medicine back into the refrigerator once you have kept it at room temperature. What happens if I miss a dose?

Contact your doctor for instructions if you miss a dose of this medication.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. What should I avoid while using antihemophilic factor (factor VIII)?

There are no restrictions on food, beverages, or activity while using this medication unless your doctor has told you otherwise.

Antihemophilic factor (factor VIII) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

nausea, stomach pain, low fever, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);

fever, chills, runny nose, and drowsiness followed about 2 weeks later by a rash and joint pain;

fast heart rate, chest pain, trouble breathing;

feeling light-headed, fainting; or

pain, redness, swelling, or oozing where the medicine was injected.

Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur, such as:

unusual taste in your mouth;

cough, runny or stuffy nose;

mild itching;

swelling in your hands, ankles, or feet;

headache or dizziness;

mild nausea, diarrhea, stomach pain;

sweating;

joint pain; or

chills or flushing (warmth or tingly feeling).

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome.

What other drugs will affect antihemophilic factor (factor VIII)?

Other drugs that affect bleeding or blood-clotting may interact with antihemophilic factor (factor VIII) and cause dangerous side effects or make the medicine less effective.

There may be other drugs that can affect antihemophilic factor (factor VIII). Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has additional information about antihemophilic factor (factor VIII) written for health professionals that you may read. What does my medication look like?

Antihemophilic factor (factor VIII) is available with a prescription under several brand names. Generic formulations may also be available. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about this medication, especially if it is new to you.


read more


Adcortyl Intra-Articular / Intradermal Injection 10mg / ml


The wording of leaflets is regularly updated. This electronic text is the most up-to-date version and may differ from the leaflet in your pack. If you have any questions about the information provided, please ask your doctor or pharmacist.

ADCORTYL

INTRA-ARTICULAR/INTRADERMAL INJECTION 10 mg/ml

Triamcinolone acetonide

Adcortyl IA/ID Injection is a steroid medicine, prescribed for many different conditions, including serious illnesses. You need to take it regularly to get the maximum benefit. Don’t stop taking this medicine without talking to your doctor – you may need to reduce the dose gradually. Adcortyl IA/ID Injection can cause side effects in some people (read section 4 below). Some problems such as mood changes (feeling depressed or ‘high’), or stomach problems can happen straight away. If you feel unwell in any way, keep taking your tablets, but see your doctor straight away. Some side effects only happen after weeks or months. These include weakness of arms and legs, or developing a rounder face (read section 4 for more information). If you take it for more than 3 weeks, you will get a blue ‘steroid card’: always keep it with you and show it to any doctor or nurse treating you. Keep away from people who have chicken pox or shingles, if you have never had them. They could affect you severely. If you do come into contact with chicken pox or shingles, see your doctor straight away.

Now read the rest of this leaflet. It includes other important information on the safe and effective use of this medicine that might be especially important for you.

Your doctor has prescribed Adcortyl injection for you. This leaflet gives a summary of information about your medicine. If you want to know more, or are not sure about anything, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

REMEMBER: This medicine is for YOU. Only a doctor can prescribe it. Never give it to anyone else. It may harm them even if they have the same symptoms as you.

Q. What Is In Adcortyl Intra-Articular / Intradermal (Ia/Id) Injection?

A. Adcortyl IA/ID Injection belongs to a group of medicines called steroids. Their full name is corticosteroids. These corticosteroids occur naturally in the body, and help to maintain health and well-being. Boosting your body with extra corticosteroid (such as Adcortyl IA/ID Injection) is an effective way to treat various illnesses involving inflammation in the body. Adcortyl IA/ID Injection reduces this inflammation, which could otherwise go on making your condition worse. You must take this medicine regularly to get maximum benefit from it.

The injection contains triamcinolone acetonide 10mg/ml and is supplied in packs of 5 x 1.0ml glass ampoules or a single 5ml glass vial. The other ingredients are benzyl alcohol, polysorbate 80, carmellose, sodium chloride and water for injection.

UK PRODUCT LICENCE

Held by:

E. R. Squibb & Sons Limited Uxbridge UB8 1DH England Tel.:0800 7311736

IRISH PRODUCT AUTHORISATION

Held by:

Bristol-Myers Squibb Pharmaceuticals Ltd. Swords County Dublin Tel.:1-800-749-749

MANUFACTURER

Bristol-Myers Squibb S.r.l. Contrada Fontana del Ceraso 03012 Anagni (FR) Italy Q. What Is This Medicine For?

A. Adcortyl IA/ID Injection is for the treatment of joint pain, swelling and stiffness in inflammatory disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis. It is also used to treat various forms of allergic dermatitis, skin overgrowths such as thickened scar tissue, and patchy baldness, which is usually reversible.

Before Receiving Your Medicine Q. Should I be receiving Adcortyl IA/ID injection?

A. You should not receive this medicine if you have ever had an allergic reaction to similar medicines or to any of the ingredients in Adcortyl IA/ID injection. You should not receive this medicine if you are suffering from an infection unless your doctor has also prescribed a treatment for the infection.

Q. Is there anything else I should discuss with my doctor before receiving Adcortyl IA/ID injection?

A. Check with your doctor before receiving Adcortyl IA/ID injection if you have had any recent infection, tuberculosis (TB), bowel disorders, an ulcer, blood clots, cancer, thin (brittle) bones, high blood pressure or heart failure, mental disorders, epilepsy, myasthenia gravis or glaucoma (increased pressure in your eyes).

Check with your doctor first:

If you have ever had severe depression or manic-depression (bipolar disorder). This includes having had depression before while taking steroid medicines like Adcortyl IA/ID Injection. If any of your close family has had these illnesses.

If either of these applies to you, talk to a doctor before taking Adcortyl IA/ID Injection.

Q. What if I have been in contact with someone who has an infectious disease such as Chickenpox, Shingles or Measles?

A. Steroid medicines suppress your body's natural immune response. Therefore, if you come into contact with anyone who has an infectious disease such as chickenpox, shingles or measles, consult your doctor promptly, especially if you have not had the disease before. You should take particular care to avoid these diseases.

Q. Can I be immunised (vaccinated)?

A. While you are being treated with this medicine (or if you have recently stopped a course of treatment) do not have any immunisation without consulting your doctor.

Q. What if I am pregnant or think I may be pregnant? What if I am planning to become pregnant? What if I am breast-feeding?

A. You should make sure you discuss this with your doctor as soon as possible before receiving Adcortyl IA/ID injection.

Q. What if I have had problems with my kidneys, liver or thyroid?

A. Remind your doctor as the dose of Adcortyl may need to be adjusted.

Q. Can I take other medicines?

A. Corticosteroids can increase the chance of bleeding from the gut caused by aspirin, ibuprofen or other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). If you have hypothrombinaemia (a tendency to bleed), your doctor will be more careful about giving you Adcortyl IA/ID injection if you are taking ibuprofen or another NSAID. Always tell your doctor about all other medicines you are taking, even those you have bought at a pharmacy or other places, e.g. supermarket. Some medicines used to treat epilepsy, tuberculosis or breast cancer can reduce the effectiveness of Adcortyl. On the other hand, Adcortyl can affect the action of some medicines used to treat diabetes, high blood pressure or to thin the blood.

Always tell your doctor if you are taking oral contraceptives, hormone replacement therapy (HRT), growth hormone, thyroid drugs, cyclosporin, or medicines for treating fungal infections, or if you are to be vaccinated or to be given an anaesthetic.

Q. Is it all right to take exercise?

A. You must take care not to over-use a joint which feels better after you receive Adcortyl IA/ID injection as the joint will still need to recover from the inflammation which caused your symptoms.

Q. Is it all right to drive?

A. This medicine does not usually affect your ability to drive but it can affect your eyesight. Tell your doctor immediately if you have any pain in the eyes or visual disturbances.

Q. Is it all right to drink alcohol?

A. There is no known interaction between Adcortyl and alcohol.

Q. What if I am diabetic?

A. Remind your doctor as your insulin dose may need to be changed.

Q. Who should I tell that I have received this injection?

A. Your doctor or pharmacist will have given you a Steroid Treatment Card with your prescription or medicine. YOU SHOULD ALWAYS CARRY THIS CARD WITH YOU as it must be shown to any of the following persons:

Doctor or Nurse - before having any surgery or emergency treatment or if any new treatment is prescribed. Dentist - before having any dental surgery Pharmacist - before buying any medicine Optician - it is advisable to have regular eye tests Q. Is there any important information about the ingredients of Adcortyl that I need to know?

A. Adcortyl IA/ID Injection contains 15mg/ml benzyl alcohol which may cause harmful or allergic reactions in infants and children. Adcortyl IA/ID injection must not be given to premature or newly born babies.

Administraton Of Your Medicine Q. How will Adcortyl IA/ID injection be given and how often?

A. The effect of the injection will vary from patient to patient and further injections may be given when symptoms return and not at regular intervals.

Use in inflammatory joint disorders:

The dose of injection to be given into a joint or into a tendon sheath depends upon the size of the joint to be treated and the severity of the condition. Doses of 2.5 - 5mg (0.25-0.5ml) for smaller joints and 5-15mg (0.5-1.5ml) for larger joints usually give relief of symptoms. This medicine should not be used for injection into the Achilles tendon.

Use in allergic dermatitis:

The dose is usually 2-3mg (0.2-0.3ml) depending on the size of the problem area of the skin but no more than 5mg (0.5ml) should be injected at any one site. If several sites are injected the total dose given should not exceed 30mg (3ml). Further doses may be given if necessary at one or two week intervals.

Children: Adcortyl IA/ID is not recommended for children under 6 years of age. It may be given to older children but the dose is adjusted according to their size and weight and is always kept as low as possible for the shortest possible time.

During times of illness or stress, patients on long-term treatment may require the addition of oral steroid tablets or, if they have recently finished a course of Adcortyl IA/ID injections, may need to start taking oral steroid tablets for a while.

Q. How long should I continue receiving Adcortyl IA/ID injection?

A. Your doctor will advise you whether it is wise for you to have further injections.

Treatment with steroids is usually kept as short as possible and must not be stopped abruptly. Joints may become permanently damaged by repeated injections over a long period of time.

When the treatment is stopped you may notice flu-like symptoms, runny nose or itchy eyes or skin.

Mental problems while taking Adcortyl IA/ID injection

Mental health problems can happen while taking steroids like Adcortyl IA/ID Injection (see also section 4 Possible Side Effects).

These illnesses can be serious. Usually they start within a few days or weeks of starting the medicine. They are more likely to happen at high doses. Most of these problems go away if the dose is lowered or the medicine is stopped. However, if problems do happen they might need treatment.

Talk to a doctor if you (or someone taking this medicine), shows any signs of mental problems. This is particularly important if you are depressed, or might be thinking about suicide. In a few cases, mental problems have happened when doses are being lowered or stopped.

Undesirable Effects Q. Are there any unwanted effects of Adcortyl IA/ID injection?

A. All medicines may cause some unwanted or “side” effects. Some which can occur with steroid treatment are as follows. Tell your doctor immediately if you get ulcer pains in your stomach or severe pain in your abdomen, facial swelling or an unexpected rash. Patients have reported increased appetite, weight gain, indigestion, sickness, feeling tired or weak. Steroid treatment may cause increased risk of infection, thinning of bones or tendons causing fractures or torn muscles, water retention, irregular heart beat, high blood pressure or blood clots. Skin disorders or eye problems, including glaucoma and cataracts, may occur and wounds or broken bones may be slow to heal. Treatment with steroids can stop the body from producing some hormones and may slow or stop children’s growth rate. If you are female, your periods may become irregular. Elevation or depression of mood, sleeplessness and severe headaches have been reported. Very rare instances of blindness have been reported following injection to the face.

In particular, when Adcortyl IA/ID is injected into a joint you may notice some indentation appearing after a while in the surrounding area. There may also be some temporary worsening of the pain and discomfort after the injection. Similarly, injections given under the skin may cause slight changes in skin colour around the site of injection. These changes should disappear in time.

Serious effects: tell a doctor straight away

Steroids including Adcortyl IA/ID injection can cause serious mental health problems. These are common in both adults and children. They can affect about 5 in every 100 people taking medicines like Adcortyl IA/ID injection.

Feeling depressed, including thinking about suicide. Feeling high (mania) or moods that go up and down. Feeling anxious, having problems sleeping, difficulty in thinking or being confused and losing your memory. Feeling, seeing or hearing things which do not exist. Having strange and frightening thoughts, changing how you act or having feelings of being alone.

If you notice any of these problems talk to a doctor straight away.

Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you notice any other troublesome side effects.

Looking After Your Medicine

Adcortyl IA/ID injection will be kept in the pharmacy until it is given to you by your doctor or nurse. It should be stored upright, at a temperature not exceeding 25°C and should not be allowed to freeze. After first opening, the 5ml multidose vial may be stored for 28 days below 25°C. It should not be used after the expiry date shown on the outer packaging. Keep out of reach and sight of children.

DATE OF LAST REVISION April 2008

1041116A7


read more


coagulation factor IX


Generic Name: coagulation factor IX (koh AG yoo LAY shun FAK tor)
Brand names: AlphaNine SD, BeneFIX, Mononine, BeneFIX 250 Int'l Units

What is coagulation factor IX?

Coagulation factor IX is a man-made protein that is similar to a natural protein in the body that helps the blood to clot.

Coagulation factor IX is used to treat or prevent bleeding in people with hemophilia B. This medication is not for treating people with hemophilia A factor VII deficiency.

Coagulation factor IX may also be used for purposes other than those listed here.

What is the most important information I should know about coagulation factor IX? Do not use this medication if you have ever had an allergic reaction to a clotting factor medication, or if you are allergic to hamster proteins.

Before using this medication, tell your doctor if you are allergic to latex rubber, or if you have liver disease, coronary artery disease (hardening of the arteries), or a history of stroke or heart attack.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition, your blood will need to be tested on a regular basis. Do not miss any scheduled appointments.

Carry an ID card or wear a medical alert bracelet stating that you have a bleeding disorder in case of emergency. Any doctor, dentist, or emergency medical care provider who treats you should know about your condition. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using coagulation factor IX? Do not use this medication if you have ever had an allergic reaction to a clotting factor medication, or if you are allergic to hamster proteins.

Before using this medication, tell your doctor if you are allergic to latex rubber, or if you have:

liver disease;

coronary artery disease (hardening of the arteries); or

history of stroke or heart attack.

FDA pregnancy category C. This medication may be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether coagulation factor IX passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I use coagulation factor IX?

Coagulation factor IX is given as an injection through a needle placed into a vein. Your doctor, nurse, or other healthcare provider will give you this injection. You may be given instructions on how to use your injections at home.

Do not use this medicine at home if you do not fully understand how to give the injection and properly dispose of needles and other items used in giving the medicine.

Use each disposable needle only one time. Throw away used needles and syringes in a puncture-proof container (ask your pharmacist where you can get one and how to dispose of it). Keep this container out of the reach of children and pets.

Coagulation factor IX is a powder medication that must be mixed with a liquid (diluent) before injecting it. Use the injection within 3 hours after mixing your dose.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition, your blood will need to be tested on a regular basis. Do not miss any scheduled appointments.

Carry an ID card or wear a medical alert bracelet stating that you have a bleeding disorder in case of emergency. Any doctor, dentist, or emergency medical care provider who treats you should know about your condition. If you store this medication at home, keep the powder medicine in the refrigerator. Do not freeze. Avoid exposing the medication to sunlight. The diluent can be stored at room temperature. You may also coagulation factor IX powder at cool room temperature for up to 6 months. What happens if I miss a dose?

Contact your doctor if you miss a dose of this medication.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine.

An overdose of coagulation factor IX is not expected to produce life-threatening symptoms.

What should I avoid while using coagulation factor IX?

Follow your doctor's instructions about any restrictions on food, beverages, or activity while you are using coagulation factor IX.

Coagulation factor IX side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

fever or chills;

continued bleeding after treatment;

feeling like you might pass out;

sudden numbness or weakness, especially on one side of the body;

sudden headache, confusion, problems with vision, speech, or balance; or

swelling in your feet or ankles, weight gain, loss of appetite.

Less serious side effects may be more likely to occur, such as:

headache;

warmth, redness, or tingly feeling under your skin;

nausea, vomiting;

dizziness; or

pain, redness, or swelling where the medicine was injected.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Coagulation factor IX Dosing Information

Usual Adult Dose for Factor IX Deficiency:

Dosage and duration of treatment for all factor IX products depend on the severity of the factor IX deficiency, the location and extent of bleeding, and the patient's clinical condition, age and recovery of factor IX.
In general, one IU of coagulation factor IX per kilogram of body weight increased the circulating activity of factor IX as follows: 0.8 + or - 0.2 IU/dL [range 0.4 to 1.2 IU/dL].
Minor
Uncomplicated hemarthroses, superficial muscle, or soft tissue:
Circulating Factor IX Activity Required: 20-30 [% or (IU/dL)]
Dosing Interval: 12 to 24 hours
Duration of Therapy: 1 to 2 days
Moderate
Intramuscular or soft tissue with dissection, mucous membranes, dental extractions, or hematuria:
Circulating Factor IX Activity Required: 25 to 50 [% or (IU/dL)]
Dosing Interval: 12 to 24 hours
Duration of Therapy: Treat until bleeding stops and healing begins, about 2 to 7 days
Major
Pharynx, retropharynx, retroperitoneum, CNS, surgery:
Circulating Factor IX Activity Required: 50 to 1000 [% or (IU/dL)]
Dosing Interval: 12 to 24 hours
Duration of Therapy: 7 to 10 days

Usual Adult Dose for Hemophilia B:

Dosage and duration of treatment for all factor IX products depend on the severity of the factor IX deficiency, the location and extent of bleeding, and the patient's clinical condition, age and recovery of factor IX.
In general, one IU of coagulation factor IX per kilogram of body weight increased the circulating activity of factor IX as follows: 0.8 + or - 0.2 IU/dL [range 0.4 to 1.2 IU/dL].
Minor
Uncomplicated hemarthroses, superficial muscle, or soft tissue:
Circulating Factor IX Activity Required: 20-30 [% or (IU/dL)]
Dosing Interval: 12 to 24 hours
Duration of Therapy: 1 to 2 days
Moderate
Intramuscular or soft tissue with dissection, mucous membranes, dental extractions, or hematuria:
Circulating Factor IX Activity Required: 25 to 50 [% or (IU/dL)]
Dosing Interval: 12 to 24 hours
Duration of Therapy: Treat until bleeding stops and healing begins, about 2 to 7 days
Major
Pharynx, retropharynx, retroperitoneum, CNS, surgery:
Circulating Factor IX Activity Required: 50 to 1000 [% or (IU/dL)]
Dosing Interval: 12 to 24 hours
Duration of Therapy: 7 to 10 days

Usual Pediatric Dose for Factor IX Deficiency:

Dosage and duration of treatment for all factor IX products depend on the severity of the factor IX deficiency, the location and extent of bleeding, and the patient's clinical condition, age and recovery of factor IX.
In general, one IU of coagulation factor IX per kilogram of body weight increased the circulating activity of factor IX as follows: 0.7 + or - 0.3 IU/dL [range 0.2 to 2.1 IU/dL].
Minor
Uncomplicated hemarthroses, superficial muscle, or soft tissue:
Circulating Factor IX Activity Required: 20-30 [% or (IU/dL)]
Dosing Interval: 12 to 24 hours
Duration of Therapy: 1 to 2 days
Moderate
Intramuscular or soft tissue with dissection, mucous membranes, dental extractions, or hematuria:
Circulating Factor IX Activity Required: 25 to 50 [% or (IU/dL)]
Dosing Interval: 12 to 24 hours
Duration of Therapy: Treat until bleeding stops and healing begins, about 2 to 7 days
Major
Pharynx, retropharynx, retroperitoneum, CNS, surgery:
Circulating Factor IX Activity Required: 50 to 1000 [% or (IU/dL)]
Dosing Interval: 12 to 24 hours
Duration of Therapy: 7 to 10 days

Usual Pediatric Dose for Hemophilia B:

Dosage and duration of treatment for all factor IX products depend on the severity of the factor IX deficiency, the location and extent of bleeding, and the patient's clinical condition, age and recovery of factor IX.
In general, one IU of coagulation factor IX per kilogram of body weight increased the circulating activity of factor IX as follows: 0.7 + or - 0.3 IU/dL [range 0.2 to 2.1 IU/dL].
Minor
Uncomplicated hemarthroses, superficial muscle, or soft tissue:
Circulating Factor IX Activity Required: 20-30 [% or (IU/dL)]
Dosing Interval: 12 to 24 hours
Duration of Therapy: 1 to 2 days
Moderate
Intramuscular or soft tissue with dissection, mucous membranes, dental extractions, or hematuria:
Circulating Factor IX Activity Required: 25 to 50 [% or (IU/dL)]
Dosing Interval: 12 to 24 hours
Duration of Therapy: Treat until bleeding stops and healing begins, about 2 to 7 days
Major
Pharynx, retropharynx, retroperitoneum, CNS, surgery:
Circulating Factor IX Activity Required: 50 to 1000 [% or (IU/dL)]
Dosing Interval: 12 to 24 hours
Duration of Therapy: 7 to 10 days

What other drugs will affect coagulation factor IX?

There may be other drugs that can interact with coagulation factor IX. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

More coagulation factor IX resources Coagulation factor IX Side Effects (in more detail) Coagulation factor IX Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Coagulation factor IX Support Group 1 Review for Coagulation factor IX - Add your own review/rating AlphaNine SD MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Alphanine SD Prescribing Information (FDA) Alphanine SD Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information BeneFIX Monograph (AHFS DI) BeneFIX Prescribing Information (FDA) BeneFix MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Mononine Prescribing Information (FDA) Mononine MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Compare coagulation factor IX with other medications Factor IX Deficiency Hemophilia B Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about coagulation factor IX.

See also: coagulation factor IX side effects (in more detail)


read more


EXUBERA


Generic Name: insulin inhalation (IN soo lin in hel AY shun)
Brand Names: EXUBERA

What is insulin inhalation?

Insulin inhalation is a rapid-acting form of human insulin that is inhaled through the mouth. It works by lowering levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood.

Insulin inhalation is used to treat type 1 (insulin dependent) or type 2 (non-insulin dependent) diabetes in adults.

Insulin inhalation (Exubera) was withdrawn from the U.S. market in 2007 due to lack of consumer demand for the product. No drug safety concerns were cited in this withdrawal.

Insulin inhalation may also be used for purposes other than those listed here.

What is the most important information I should know about insulin inhalation?

Insulin inhalation (Exubera) was withdrawn from the U.S. market in 2007 due to lack of consumer demand for the product. No drug safety concerns were cited in this withdrawal.

Do not use insulin inhalation if you smoke, or if you have recently quit smoking (within the past 6 months). If you start smoking while using insulin inhalation, you will have to stop using this medication and switch to another form of insulin to control your blood sugar.

Before using this medicine, tell your doctor if you have kidney disease, liver disease, or lung disorders such as asthma or COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease).

You should not insulin inhalation if you have a lung disease that is not well controlled with medication or other treatments.

There are many other drugs that can potentially interfere with the glucose-lowering effects of insulin inhalation. It is extremely important that you tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

If there are any changes in the brand, strength, or type of insulin you use, your dosage needs may change. Always check your medicine when it is refilled to make sure you have received the correct brand and type as prescribed by your doctor. Ask the pharmacist if you have any questions about the medicine given to you at the pharmacy.

If you use insulin inhalation as a meal-time insulin, use it no more than 10 minutes before eating the meal.

This medication is only part of a complete program of treatment that may also include diet, exercise, weight control, and testing your blood sugar. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely. Changing any of these factors can affect your blood sugar levels.

Take care to keep your blood sugar from getting too low, causing hypoglycemia. Know the signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia, which include headache, confusion, drowsiness, weakness, dizziness, fast heartbeat, sweating, tremor, and nausea. Carry a piece of non-dietetic hard candy or glucose tablets with you in case you have low blood sugar.

What should I discuss with my health care provider before taking insulin inhalation?

Before using this medicine, tell your doctor if you have kidney disease, liver disease, or lung disorders such as asthma or COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease).

You should not use insulin inhalation if you have a lung disease that is not well controlled with medication or other treatments.

If you have type 1 diabetes, you should use this medication in addition to another long-acting type of insulin.

If you have type 2 diabetes, this may be the only medication you use to control your blood sugar, or your doctor may prescribe another long-acting insulin or diabetes medicine you take by mouth.

This medication is only part of a complete program of treatment that may also include diet, exercise, weight control, and testing your blood sugar. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely. Changing any of these factors can affect your blood sugar levels.

If there are any changes in the brand, strength, or type of insulin you use, your dosage needs may change. Always check your medicine when it is refilled to make sure you have received the correct brand and type as prescribed by your doctor. Ask the pharmacist if you have any questions about the medicine given to you at the pharmacy.

FDA pregnancy category C. This medication may be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. Insulin inhalation can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take insulin inhalation?

Use insulin inhalation exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not use it in larger doses or for longer than recommended by your doctor.

Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results from this medication.

If you use insulin inhalation as a meal-time insulin, use it no more than 10 minutes before eating the meal.

To be sure this medication is not causing certain side effects, your lung function will need to be tested on a regular basis. It is important that you not miss any scheduled visits to your doctor.

Continue using insulin inhalation if you have a cold or flu virus that causes upper respiratory symptoms (cough, sore throat, nasal congestion). Check your blood sugar carefully during a time of stress or illness, since this can also affect your glucose levels.

Insulin inhalation is a powder that is supplied in "dose blisters" on cards that are packaged in a clear plastic tray. This tray is sealed inside a foil pouch that also contains a moisture-absorbing preservative packet. The 1-milligram (mg) dose blisters are supplied on a card printed with green ink. The 3-mg dose blisters are supplied on a card printed with blue ink.

Each 1-milligram dose blister of insulin inhalation powder is equal to 3 units of injectable insulin and each 3-milligram dose blister is equal to 8 units of injectable insulin. Using three of the 1-mg dose blisters will not give you the same amount of medicine as one 3-mg dose blister. You may receive too much insulin when using three 1-mg dose blisters together, which could result in hypoglycemia.

If you are combining 1-mg and 3-mg dose blisters to get your correct dose of insulin, always use the least number of blisters possible. For example, if your dose is 4 mg, use a 1-mg blister and a 3-mg blister (a total of two blisters). Do not use four 1-mg blisters or you may receive too much of this medication

The inhaler unit supplied with this medication includes a base, a chamber, and a release unit. Each release unit may be used for up to 2 weeks before replacing. You may use the inhaler for up to 1 year before replacing it.

Store the medication at room temperature, away from moisture and heat. Do not refrigerate or freeze. Protect the medicine from moisture and humidity at all times. Do not store the medicine in a bathroom where you shower.

Once you have opened the foil pouch, keep the unused dose blisters in the pouch and use them within 3 months after opening the pouch. Keep the moisture-absorbing preservative packet contained in the foil pouch and do not open the packet or use its contents.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Use the medication as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and wait until your next regularly scheduled dose. Do not use extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

If you use this medication as meal-time insulin and you forget to use your dose before a meal, use the insulin when you remember and wait 10 minutes before eating.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine.

Symptoms of an insulin inhalation overdose may be the same as signs of low blood sugar: confusion, drowsiness, weakness, fast heartbeat, sweating, tremor, and nausea.

What should I avoid while taking insulin inhalation? Do not smoke while using insulin inhalation. You should not use this medication if you have smoked within the past 6 months. If you start smoking while using insulin inhalation, you will have to stop using the medication and switch to another form of insulin to control your blood sugar.

Avoid letting your blood sugar get too low, causing hypoglycemia. Know the signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia, which include headache, confusion, drowsiness, weakness, dizziness, fast heartbeat, sweating, tremor, and nausea. Carry a piece of non-dietetic hard candy or glucose tablets with you in case you have low blood sugar.

Insulin inhalation side effects

Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) is the most common side effect of insulin inhalation. Watch for signs of low blood sugar, which include headache, confusion, drowsiness, weakness, dizziness, fast heartbeat, sweating, tremor, and nausea. Carry a piece of non-dietetic hard candy or glucose tablets with you in case you have low blood sugar.

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: rash, hives, or itching; wheezing, gasping for breath; fast heartbeat; sweating; feeling light-headed or fainting.

Other less serious side effects are more likely to occur, such as:

cough, sore throat;

runny or stuffy nose;

dry mouth; or

ear pain.

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome.

What other drugs will affect insulin inhalation?

There are many other drugs that can potentially interfere with the glucose-lowering effects of insulin inhalation. It is extremely important that you tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

If you use other inhaled medications, use them before using insulin inhalation.

More EXUBERA resources EXUBERA Side Effects (in more detail) EXUBERA Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding EXUBERA Drug Interactions EXUBERA Support Group 4 Reviews for EXUBERA - Add your own review/rating Exubera Prescribing Information (FDA) Exubera Powder MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Exubera Consumer Overview Compare EXUBERA with other medications Diabetes, Type 1 Diabetes, Type 2 Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about insulin inhalation.

See also: EXUBERA side effects (in more detail)


read more


Abacavir Solution


Pronunciation: a-BAK-a-vir
Generic Name: Abacavir
Brand Name: Ziagen

Abacavir Solution has caused severe and sometimes fatal allergic reactions. Contact your doctor right away if you develop fever; rash; nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, or stomach pain; cough; sore throat, or trouble breathing; unusual tiredness or achiness; or general feeling of being unwell. Do NOT take Abacavir Solution again or take any other medicine that contains abacavir if you have had an allergic reaction to Abacavir Solution. You may be at risk for an even more severe allergic reaction.

Patients who have a certain gene type called HLA-B*5701 have an increased risk of allergic reaction. A lab test may be performed before you start Abacavir Solution to see if you have this gene type. Discuss any questions or concerns with your doctor.

Abacavir Solution may cause severe and sometimes fatal liver problems or high blood acid levels (lactic acidosis). Contact your doctor right away if you develop yellowing of the skin or eyes; dark urine; pale stools; stomach pain; nausea; vomiting; diarrhea; persistent loss of appetite; fast or difficult breathing; slow or irregular heartbeat; unusual weakness or tiredness; muscle pain or tenderness; unusual feeling of cold (eg, in arms or legs); or unusual drowsiness, dizziness, or lightheadedness.


Abacavir Solution is used for:

Treating HIV infection with other medications.

Abacavir is a nucleoside analog reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI). It works by slowing down the growth of HIV, the virus that causes AIDS.

Do NOT use Abacavir Solution if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Abacavir Solution you have had a recent abnormal liver function test or have moderate to severe liver problems

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Before using Abacavir Solution:

Some medical conditions may interact with Abacavir Solution. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding or thinking about breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you have a history of heart problems (eg, heart attack), high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, or smoking if you have been tested and know whether or not you have a gene type called HLA-B*5701

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Abacavir Solution. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Alcohol because it may increase the risk of Abacavir Solution's side effects and toxic effects Methadone because its effectiveness may be decreased by Abacavir Solution

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Abacavir Solution may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Abacavir Solution:

Use Abacavir Solution as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Abacavir Solution comes with an extra patient information sheet called a Medication Guide. Read it carefully. Read it again each time you get Abacavir Solution refilled. Abacavir Solution comes with a warning card that provides information about recognition of allergic reactions. Carry the warning card of allergy symptoms with you. Tell your health care provider immediately about any side effects you experience while taking Abacavir Solution. Take Abacavir Solution by mouth with or without food. Use a measuring device marked for medicine dosing. Ask your pharmacist for help if you are unsure of how to measure your dose. Taking Abacavir Solution at the same times each day will help you to remember to take it. Continue to take Abacavir Solution even if you feel well. Do not miss any doses. If you miss a dose of Abacavir Solution, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Abacavir Solution.

Important safety information: Talk to your doctor before you take Abacavir Solution if you drink more than 3 drinks with alcohol per day. Tell your doctor or dentist that you take Abacavir Solution before you receive any medical or dental care, emergency care, or surgery. If you must stop taking Abacavir Solution for any reason other than a serious allergic reaction, do not start taking Abacavir Solution again without talking with your health care provider. If your health care provider decides that you may take Abacavir Solution again, you should do so only in a setting with other people in case you need immediate access to a doctor. When your medicine supply is low, get more from your doctor or pharmacist as soon as you can. Do not stop taking Abacavir Solution, even for a short period of time. If you do, the virus may grow resistant to the medicine and become harder to treat. Changes in body fat (eg, an increased amount of fat in the upper back, neck, breast, and trunk, and loss of fat from the legs, arms, and face) may occur in some patients taking Abacavir Solution. The cause and long-term effects of these changes are unknown. Discuss any concerns with your doctor. Abacavir Solution does not stop the spread of HIV to others through blood or sexual contact. Use barrier methods of birth control (eg, condoms) if you have HIV infection. Do not share needles, injection supplies, or items like toothbrushes or razors. Abacavir Solution is not a cure for HIV infection. Patients may still get illnesses and infections associated with HIV. Remain under the care of your doctor. Lab tests, including liver function tests and monitoring for hypersensitivity reactions, may be performed while you use Abacavir Solution. These tests may be used to monitor your condition or check for side effects. Be sure to keep all doctor and lab appointments. Use Abacavir Solution with caution in the ELDERLY; they may be more sensitive to its effects, especially liver, kidney, or heart problems. Caution is advised when using Abacavir Solution in CHILDREN; they may be more sensitive to its effects, especially fever; chills; rash; or ear, nose, or throat infection. Abacavir Solution should not be used in CHILDREN younger than 3 months old; safety and effectiveness in these children have not been confirmed. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: If you become pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Abacavir Solution while you are pregnant. It is not known if Abacavir Solution is found in breast milk. Mothers infected with HIV should not breast-feed. There is a risk of passing the HIV infection or Abacavir Solution to the baby. Possible side effects of Abacavir Solution:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Headache; lack of energy; mild nausea; tiredness; trouble sleeping; unusual dreams; vomiting.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); burning, numbness, or tingling of the skin; change in the amount of urine produced; chest pain or discomfort, numbness of an arm or leg, or sudden vision changes; ear pain; eye pain, redness, or swelling; fainting; fever or chills; general feeling of being unwell; mental or mood changes (eg, depression); mouth sores; red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin; severe or persistent dizziness; severe or persistent nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea; shortness of breath, cough, or sore throat; stomach pain; swollen lymph nodes; symptoms of lactic acidosis (eg, fast breathing; muscle pain; unusual cold feeling in the arms or legs; sluggishness; unusual drowsiness, dizziness, or lightheadedness); symptoms of liver problems (eg, yellowing of the skin or eyes, dark urine, pale stools, loss of appetite, severe or persistent tiredness); unusual achiness or swelling.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

See also: Abacavir side effects (in more detail)

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center, or emergency room immediately.

Proper storage of Abacavir Solution:

Store Abacavir Solution at room temperature, between 68 and 77 degrees F (20 and 25 degrees C). Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Abacavir Solution out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Abacavir Solution, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Abacavir Solution is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is summary only. It does not contain all information about Abacavir Solution. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Abacavir resources Abacavir Side Effects (in more detail) Abacavir Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Abacavir Drug Interactions Abacavir Support Group 0 Reviews for Abacavir - Add your own review/rating Compare Abacavir with other medications HIV Infection Nonoccupational Exposure
read more


Abacavir


Pronunciation: a-BAK-a-vir
Generic Name: Abacavir
Brand Name: Ziagen

Abacavir has caused severe and sometimes fatal allergic reactions. Contact your doctor right away if you develop fever; rash; nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, or stomach pain; cough; sore throat, or trouble breathing; unusual tiredness or achiness; or general feeling of being unwell. Do NOT take Abacavir again or take any other medicine that contains abacavir if you have had an allergic reaction to Abacavir. You may be at risk for an even more severe allergic reaction.

Patients who have a certain gene type called HLA-B*5701 have an increased risk of allergic reaction. A lab test may be performed before you start Abacavir to see if you have this gene type. Discuss any questions or concerns with your doctor.

Abacavir may cause severe and sometimes fatal liver problems or high blood acid levels (lactic acidosis). Contact your doctor right away if you develop yellowing of the skin or eyes; dark urine; pale stools; stomach pain; nausea; vomiting; diarrhea; persistent loss of appetite; fast or difficult breathing; slow or irregular heartbeat; unusual weakness or tiredness; muscle pain or tenderness; unusual feeling of cold (eg, in arms or legs); or unusual drowsiness, dizziness, or lightheadedness.


Abacavir is used for:

Treating HIV infection with other medications.

Abacavir is a nucleoside analog reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI). It works by slowing down the growth of HIV, the virus that causes AIDS.

Do NOT use Abacavir if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Abacavir you have had a recent abnormal liver function test or have moderate to severe liver problems

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Before using Abacavir:

Some medical conditions may interact with Abacavir. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding or thinking about breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you have a history of heart problems (eg, heart attack), high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, or smoking if you have been tested and know whether or not you have a gene type called HLA-B*5701

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Abacavir. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Alcohol because it may increase the risk of Abacavir's side effects and toxic effects Methadone because its effectiveness may be decreased by Abacavir

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Abacavir may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Abacavir:

Use Abacavir as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Abacavir comes with an extra patient information sheet called a Medication Guide. Read it carefully. Read it again each time you get Abacavir refilled. Abacavir comes with a warning card that provides information about recognition of allergic reactions. Carry the warning card of allergy symptoms with you. Tell your health care provider immediately about any side effects you experience while taking Abacavir. Take Abacavir by mouth with or without food. Using Abacavir at the same times each day will help you remember to take it. Continue to take Abacavir even if you feel well. Do not miss any doses. If you miss a dose of Abacavir, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Abacavir.

Important safety information: Talk to your doctor before you take Abacavir if you drink more than 3 drinks with alcohol per day. Tell your doctor or dentist that you take Abacavir before you receive any medical or dental care, emergency care, or surgery. If you must stop taking Abacavir for any reason other than a serious allergic reaction, do not start taking Abacavir again without talking with your health care provider. If your health care provider decides that you may take Abacavir again, you should do so only in a setting with other people in case you need immediate access to a doctor. When your medicine supply is low, get more from your doctor or pharmacist as soon as you can. Do not stop taking Abacavir, even for a short period of time. If you do, the virus may grow resistant to the medicine and become harder to treat. Changes in body fat (eg, an increased amount of fat in the upper back, neck, breast, and trunk, and loss of fat from the legs, arms, and face) may occur in some patients taking Abacavir. The cause and long-term effects of these changes are unknown. Discuss any concerns with your doctor. Abacavir does not stop the spread of HIV to others through blood or sexual contact. Use barrier methods of birth control (eg, condoms) if you have HIV infection. Do not share needles, injection supplies, or items like toothbrushes or razors. Abacavir is not a cure for HIV infection. Patients may still get illnesses and infections associated with HIV. Remain under the care of your doctor. Lab tests, including liver function and monitoring for hypersensitivity reactions, may be performed while you use Abacavir. These tests may be used to monitor your condition or check for side effects. Be sure to keep all doctor and lab appointments. Use Abacavir with caution in the ELDERLY; they may be more sensitive to its effects, especially liver, kidney, or heart problems. Caution is advised when using Abacavir in CHILDREN; they may be more sensitive to its effects, especially fever; chills; rash; or ear, nose, or throat infection. Abacavir should not be used in CHILDREN younger than 3 months old; safety and effectiveness in these children have not been confirmed. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: If you become pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Abacavir while you are pregnant. It is not known if Abacavir is found in breast milk. Mothers infected with HIV should not breast-feed. There is a risk of passing the HIV infection or Abacavir to the baby. Possible side effects of Abacavir:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Headache; lack of energy; mild nausea; tiredness; trouble sleeping; unusual dreams; vomiting.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); burning, numbness, or tingling of the skin; change in the amount of urine produced; chest pain or discomfort, numbness of an arm or leg, or sudden vision changes; ear pain; eye pain, redness, or swelling; fainting; fever or chills; general feeling of being unwell; mental or mood changes (eg, depression); mouth sores; red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin; severe or persistent dizziness; severe or persistent nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea; shortness of breath, cough, or sore throat; stomach pain; swollen lymph nodes; symptoms of lactic acidosis (eg, fast breathing; muscle pain; unusual cold feeling in the arms or legs; sluggishness; unusual drowsiness, dizziness, or lightheadedness); symptoms of liver problems (eg, yellowing of the skin or eyes, dark urine, pale stools, loss of appetite, severe or persistent tiredness); unusual achiness or swelling.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

See also: Abacavir side effects (in more detail)

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center, or emergency room immediately.

Proper storage of Abacavir:

Store Abacavir at room temperature, between 68 and 77 degrees F (20 and 25 degrees C). Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Abacavir out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Abacavir, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Abacavir is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is summary only. It does not contain all information about Abacavir. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Abacavir resources Abacavir Side Effects (in more detail) Abacavir Dosage Abacavir Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Abacavir Drug Interactions Abacavir Support Group 0 Reviews for Abacavir - Add your own review/rating abacavir Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information abacavir Concise Consumer Information (Cerner Multum) Abacavir Sulfate Monograph (AHFS DI) Ziagen Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare Abacavir with other medications HIV Infection Nonoccupational Exposure
read more


Related Search: