Anemia, Megaloblastic Medications


Definition of Anemia, Megaloblastic: Megaloblastic anemia is a blood disorder characterized by anemia, with red blood cells that are larger than normal, usually resulting from a deficiency of folic acid or of vitamin B-12.

Drugs associated with Anemia, Megaloblastic

The following drugs and medications are in some way related to, or used in the treatment of Anemia, Megaloblastic. This service should be used as a supplement to, and NOT a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners.

Topics under Anemia, Megaloblastic B12 Nutritional Deficiency (10 drugs) Folic Acid Deficiency (5 drugs) Folic Acid/Cyanocobalamin Deficiency (0 drugs) Pernicious Anemia (21 drugs in 2 topics) Learn more about Anemia, Megaloblastic

Medical Encyclopedia:

Megaloblastic anemia
Drug List: Fa-8 Folacin-800 Wellcovorin
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Anemia, Chemotherapy Induced Medications


Definition of Anemia, Chemotherapy Induced: Anemia is an inadequate supply of red blood cells, resulting in a decrease in the oxygen-carrying capacity of the blood. A common reason that cancer patients experience anemia is as a side effect of chemotherapy. Anemia is important because it may cause unwanted symptoms, such as fatigue, tiredness or shortness of breath, and may exacerbate or cause other medical problems, such as a heart condition.

Drugs associated with Anemia, Chemotherapy Induced

The following drugs and medications are in some way related to, or used in the treatment of Anemia, Chemotherapy Induced. This service should be used as a supplement to, and NOT a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners.

Learn more about Anemia, Chemotherapy Induced

Medical Encyclopedia:

Anemia
Drug List: Aranesp Epogen Procrit
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Aplastic Anemia Medications


Definition of Aplastic Anemia: Aplastic anemia occurs when the bone marrow produces too few of all three types of blood cells: red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. A reduced number of red blood cells causes hemoglobin to drop. A reduced number of white blood cells makes the patient susceptible to infection. And, a reduced number of platelets causes the blood not to clot as easily.

Drugs associated with Aplastic Anemia

The following drugs and medications are in some way related to, or used in the treatment of Aplastic Anemia. This service should be used as a supplement to, and NOT a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners.

Learn more about Aplastic Anemia

Micromedex Care Notes:

Aplastic Anemia Bone Marrow Failure In Children

Medical Encyclopedia:

Anemia

Harvard Health Guide:

Symptoms and treatment for Aplastic Anemia
Drug List: Atgam Leukine Neupogen
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Recombinant human erythropoietins


A drug may be classified by the chemical type of the active ingredient or by the way it is used to treat a particular condition. Each drug can be classified into one or more drug classes.

Recombinant human erythropoietins, act like endogenous erythropoietin to stimulate erythropoiesis, the process of red blood cell production. Endogenous erythropoietin is a hormone that is secreted by particular cells in the kidneys in response to reduced levels of oxygen reaching the tissues in the kidneys.

Recombinant human erythropoietins are given to patients with kidney failure to treat anemia.

See also

Medical conditions associated with recombinant human erythropoietins:

Anemia Anemia Associated with Chronic Renal Failure Anemia Prior to Surgery Anemia, Chemotherapy Induced Anemia, Drug Induced Drug List: Aranesp Epogen Mircera Procrit
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Hemoglobinopathy Medications


Definition of Hemoglobinopathy: Hemoglobinopathy is a group of rare, inherited disorders involving abnormal structure of the hemoglobin molecule. These disorders include hemoglobin C disease , hemoglobin S-C disease, sickle cell anemia, and various types of thalassemia.

Topics under Hemoglobinopathy Thalassemia (0 drugs) Learn more about Hemoglobinopathy

Micromedex Care Notes:

Hemolytic Anemia

Medical Encyclopedia:

Hemoglobinopathy Hemolytic anemia
Drug List:
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Hemolytic Anemia Medications


Definition of Hemolytic Anemia: Hemolytic anemia is a condition of an inadequate number of circulating red blood cells (anemia), caused by premature destruction of red blood cells. There are a number of specific types of hemolytic anemia which are described individually.

Drugs associated with Hemolytic Anemia

The following drugs and medications are in some way related to, or used in the treatment of Hemolytic Anemia. This service should be used as a supplement to, and NOT a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners.

See sub-topics

Topics under Hemolytic Anemia Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia (4 drugs) G-6-PD Deficiency (0 drugs) Learn more about Hemolytic Anemia

Micromedex Care Notes:

Erythroblastosis Fetalis Hemolytic Anemia Jaundice In Newborns Rh Factor Incompatibility

Medical Encyclopedia:

Congenital spherocytic anemia Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia Hemolytic anemia Hemolytic anemia caused by chemicals and toxins Iron deficiency anemia Newborn jaundice Rh incompatibility

Harvard Health Guide:

Symptoms and treatment for Hemolytic Anemia
Drug List: Aristocort Baycadron Clinacort-Injection Clinalog-Injection Cortone-Acetate De-Sone-La-Injection Decadron Dexacen-4-Injection Dexacort-Phosphate-In-Turbinaire Dexamethasone-Intensol Dexasone-Injection Dexasone-La-Injection Dexpak-Tablets-Dose-Pack Ken-Jec-40-Injection Kenalog-40-Suspension Solurex-Injection Solurex-La-Injection Tac-3-Injection Triam-Forte Triamcot-Injection Triamonide-40-Injection U-Tri-Lone-Injection Zema-Pak-10-Day
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Iron Hydrogenated Dextran



Dosage Form: injection
Iron Hydrogenated Dextran INDICATIONS

For the prevention and treatment of anemia due to iron deficiency in baby pigs.

Iron Hydrogenated Dextran Dosage and Administration

For intramuscular injection only.

Prevention: 1 mL (100 mg iron) at 2 to 4 days of age.
Treatment: 1 mL (100 mg iron). Treatment may be repeated in 10 days.

NOTICE: Organic iron preparations injected intramuscularly into pigs beyond 4 weeks of age may cause staining of muscle tissue.

See accompanying leaflet for additional information.

Each mL of sterile solution contains 100 mg of elemental iron stabilized with a low molecular weight hydrogenated dextran and 0.5% phenol as a preservative.



Store at controlled room temperature between 15o and 30oC (59o - 86oF)
Protect from freezing.
TAKE TIME OBSERVE LABEL DIRECTIONS.


Iron Hydrogenated Dextran INJECTION

HEMATINIC

For Prevention and Treatment of Iron Deficiency Anemia in Baby Pigs

FOR ANIMAL USE ONLY

KEEP OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN

NET CONTENTS: 100 mL


Iron Hydrogenated Dextran 
iron  injection Product Information Product Type OTC ANIMAL DRUG NDC Product Code (Source) 58005-040 Route of Administration INTRAMUSCULAR DEA Schedule      Active Ingredient/Active Moiety Ingredient Name Basis of Strength Strength IRON (IRON) IRON 100  mg  in 1 mL Inactive Ingredients Ingredient Name Strength No Inactive Ingredients Found Product Characteristics Color      Score      Shape Size Flavor Imprint Code Contains          Packaging # NDC Package Description Multilevel Packaging 1 58005-040-04 100 mL In 1 VIAL None
Marketing Information Marketing Category Application Number or Monograph Citation Marketing Start Date Marketing End Date NADA NADA138-255 08/11/1995
Labeler - Sparhawk Laboratories, Inc. (958829558) Revised: 06/2010Sparhawk Laboratories, Inc.
More Iron Hydrogenated Dextran resources Iron Hydrogenated Dextran Side Effects (in more detail) Iron Hydrogenated Dextran Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Iron Hydrogenated Dextran Drug Interactions Iron Hydrogenated Dextran Support Group 0 Reviews for Iron Hydrogenated Dextran - Add your own review/rating Compare Iron Hydrogenated Dextran with other medications Anemia Associated with Chronic Renal Failure Iron Deficiency Anemia
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Vitamin C Deficiency Medications


There are currently no drugs listed for "Vitamin C Deficiency".

Definition of Vitamin C Deficiency: A condition characterized by general weakness, anemia, gum disease (gingivitis), and skin hemorrhages resulting from a lack of ascorbic acid (Vitamin C) in the diet. Scurvy is now most frequently seen in older, malnourished adults.

Learn more about Vitamin C Deficiency

Medical Encyclopedia:

Scurvy
Drug List:
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Hemosiderosis Medications


Definition of Hemosiderosis:

Transfusional hemosiderosis is the accumulation of iron in patients who receive frequent blood transfusions (such as those with thalassemia, sickle cell disease, aplastic anemia or myelodysplastic syndrome).Drugs associated with Hemosiderosis

The following drugs and medications are in some way related to, or used in the treatment of Hemosiderosis. This service should be used as a supplement to, and NOT a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners.


Drug List: Exjade Ferriprox
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ferumoxytol


Generic Name: ferumoxytol (FER ue MOX i tol)
Brand Names: Feraheme

What is ferumoxytol?

Ferumoxytol is a type of iron. You normally get iron from the foods you eat. In your body, iron becomes a part of your hemoglobin (HEEM o glo bin) and myoglobin (MY o glo bin). Hemoglobin carries oxygen through your blood to tissues and organs. Myoglobin helps your muscle cells store oxygen.

Ferumoxytol is used to treat iron deficiency anemia in people with chronic kidney disease. Anemia is a lack of red blood cells caused by having too little iron in the body.

Ferumoxytol may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about ferumoxytol? You should not use this medication if you have ever had an allergic reaction to an injectable form of iron (including ferumoxytol), or if you have iron overload syndrome or any type of anemia that is not caused by iron deficiency.

Before you receive ferumoxytol, tell your doctor if you are on dialysis.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition, your blood will need to be tested often. This will help your doctor determine how long to treat you with ferumoxytol. Visit your doctor regularly.

Ferumoxytol can cause unusual results with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tests for up to 3 months after you receive this medication. Tell any doctor who treats you that you have received a ferumoxytol injection within the past 3 months.

Ferumoxytol will not affect other types of X-rays, CT scans, ultrasounds, or nuclear radiation imaging.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before receiving ferumoxytol? You should not use this medication if you have ever had an allergic reaction to an injectable form of iron (including ferumoxytol), or if you have:

iron load syndrome; or

any type of anemia that is not caused by iron deficiency.

Before you receive ferumoxytol, tell your doctor if you are on dialysis.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether ferumoxytol will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication. It is not known whether ferumoxytol passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while you are using ferumoxytol. How is ferumoxytol given?

Ferumoxytol is injected into a vein through an IV. You will receive this injection in a clinic or hospital setting.

You will be watched closely for at least 30 minutes after receiving ferumoxytol, to make sure you do not have an allergic reaction to the medication.

Ferumoxytol is usually given as a single injection followed by a second injection 3 to 8 days later.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition, your blood will need to be tested often. This will help your doctor determine how long to treat you with ferumoxytol. Visit your doctor regularly.

Ferumoxytol can cause unusual results with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tests for up to 3 months after you receive this medication. Tell any doctor who treats you that you have received a ferumoxytol injection within the past 3 months.

Ferumoxytol will not affect other types of X-rays, CT scans, ultrasounds, or nuclear radiation imaging.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Call your doctor for instructions if you miss an appointment for your ferumoxytol injection.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. What should I avoid while using ferumoxytol?

Follow your doctor's instructions about any restrictions on food, beverages, or activity.

Do not take any vitamin or mineral supplements that your doctor has not prescribed or recommended. Ferumoxytol side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; wheezing or difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Watch for signs of allergic reaction for at least 30 minutes after your injection.

Call your doctor at once if you have serious side effects such as:

feeling like you might pass out;

slow heart rate, weak pulse, fainting, slow breathing (breathing may stop);

easy bruising;

swelling where the medicine was injected; or

worsening symptoms of kidney failure (urinating less than usual or not at all, confusion, mood changes, increased thirst, loss of appetite, swelling, weight gain, feeling short of breath).

Less serious side effects may include:

nausea, vomiting, stomach pain;

diarrhea, constipation;

headache, dizziness;

swelling in your hands or feet;

chest pain; or

cough.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Ferumoxytol Dosing Information

Usual Adult Dose for Iron Deficiency Anemia:

For iron deficiency anemia in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD):
Initial: Parenteral: 510 mg (17 ml) as a single intravenous injection followed by a second 510 mg intravenous injection 3 to 8 days later.
Maintenance: The recommended ferumoxytol dose may be readministered to patients with persistent or recurrent iron deficiency anemia.

What other drugs will affect ferumoxytol?

Tell your doctor if you are also taking an oral iron supplement (including ferrous gluconate, ferrous fumarate, or ferrous sulfate). Treatment with ferumoxytol can make it harder for your body to absorb iron supplements taken by mouth.

There may be other drugs that can interact with ferumoxytol. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

More ferumoxytol resources Ferumoxytol Side Effects (in more detail) Ferumoxytol Dosage Ferumoxytol Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Ferumoxytol Drug Interactions Ferumoxytol Support Group 0 Reviews for Ferumoxytol - Add your own review/rating ferumoxytol Intravenous Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information Ferumoxytol Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer) Ferumoxytol MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Ferumoxytol Monograph (AHFS DI) Feraheme Prescribing Information (FDA) Feraheme Consumer Overview Compare ferumoxytol with other medications Anemia Associated with Chronic Renal Failure Iron Deficiency Anemia Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist can provide more information about ferumoxytol.

See also: ferumoxytol side effects (in more detail)


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Cobolin-M injection


Generic Name: cyanocobalamin (injection) (sye AN oh koe BAL a min)
Brand Names: Cobolin-M, Cyomin, Depo-Cobolin, Vitamin B-12, Vitamin B12

What is Cobolin-M (cyanocobalamin (injection))?

Cyanocobalamin is a man-made form of vitamin B12. Vitamin B12 is important for growth, cell reproduction, blood formation, and protein and tissue synthesis.

Cyanocobalamin is used to treat vitamin B12 deficiency in people with pernicious anemia and other conditions.

Cyanocobalamin may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Cobolin-M (cyanocobalamin (injection))? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to cobalt, or if you have Leber's disease. Cyanocobalamin can lead to optic nerve damage (and possibly blindness) in people with Leber's disease.

To treat pernicious anemia, you will have to use this medication on a regular basis for the rest of your life. Not using the medication can lead to irreversible nerve damage in your spinal cord.

Pernicious anemia is also treated with folic acid to help maintain red blood cells. However, folic acid will not treat Vitamin B12 deficiency and will not prevent possible damage to the spinal cord. Take all of your medications as directed.

Your dose needs may change if you become pregnant, if you breast-feed, or if you eat a vegetarian diet. Tell your doctor about any changes in your diet or medical condition. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using Cobolin-M (cyanocobalamin (injection))? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to cobalt, or if you have Leber's disease. Cyanocobalamin can lead to optic nerve damage (and possibly blindness) in people with Leber's disease.

If you have any of these other conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely use cyanocobalamin injection:

any type of infection;

iron or folic acid deficiency;

kidney or liver disease; or

if you are receiving any medication or treatment that affects bone marrow.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether cyanocobalamin injection is harmful to an unborn baby. Before using this medication, tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. Cyanocobalamin passes into breast milk, but it is not known whether cyanocobalamin could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I use Cobolin-M (cyanocobalamin (injection))?

Use this medication exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use it in larger amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Your dose needs may change if you become pregnant, if you breast-feed, or if you eat a vegetarian diet. Tell your doctor about any changes in your diet or medical condition.

The injection form is given as a shot into a muscle or under the skin. Your doctor, nurse, or other healthcare provider will give you this injection. You may be shown how to inject your medicine at home. Do not self-inject this medicine if you do not fully understand how to give the injection and properly dispose of used needles and syringes.

Use each disposable needle only one time. Throw away used needles in a puncture-proof container (ask your pharmacist where you can get one and how to dispose of it). Keep this container out of the reach of children and pets.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition, your blood will need to be tested every 3 to 6 months. This will help your doctor determine the correct dose and how long to treat you with cyanocobalamin. Do not miss any scheduled appointments.

To treat pernicious anemia, you will have to use this medication on a regular basis for the rest of your life. Not using the medication can lead to irreversible nerve damage in your spinal cord.

Pernicious anemia is also treated with folic acid to help maintain red blood cells. However, folic acid will not treat Vitamin B12 deficiency and will not prevent possible damage to the spinal cord. Take all of your medications as directed.

Store this medication at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light. What happens if I miss a dose?

Call your doctor for instructions if you miss a dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of cyanocobalamin is not likely to cause life-threatening symptoms. What should I avoid while using Cobolin-M (cyanocobalamin (injection))? Avoid drinking large amounts of alcohol while you are being treated with cyanocobalamin. Cobolin-M (cyanocobalamin (injection)) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

chest pain;

feeling short of breath, even with mild exertion;

swelling, rapid weight gain; or

unusual warmth, redness, or pain in an arm or leg.

Less serious side effects may include:

headache, dizziness, weakness;

nausea, upset stomach, diarrhea;

numbness or tingling;

pain, swelling, redness, or irritation where the injection was given;

fever;

joint pain; or

itching or rash.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Cobolin-M (cyanocobalamin (injection))?

Before using cyanocobalamin, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following medications:

antibiotics;

methotrexate (Rheumatrex);

pyrimethamine (Daraprim);

colchicine; or

if you drank a lot of alcohol within the past 2 weeks.

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with cyanocobalamin. Tell your doctor about all your prescription and over-the-counter medications, vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

Where can I get more information injection? Your pharmacist can provide more information about cyanocobalamin.

See also: Cobolin-M side effects (in more detail)

More Cobolin-M resources Cobolin-M Side Effects (in more detail) Cobolin-M Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Cobolin-M Drug Interactions Cobolin-M Support Group 0 Reviews for Cobolin-M - Add your own review/rating Compare Cobolin-M with other medications B12 Nutritional Deficiency Pernicious Anemia Schilling Test Vitamin B12 Deficiency
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Cyomin injection


Generic Name: cyanocobalamin (injection) (sye AN oh koe BAL a min)
Brand Names: Cobolin-M, Cyomin, Depo-Cobolin, Vitamin B-12, Vitamin B12

What is Cyomin (cyanocobalamin (injection))?

Cyanocobalamin is a man-made form of vitamin B12. Vitamin B12 is important for growth, cell reproduction, blood formation, and protein and tissue synthesis.

Cyanocobalamin is used to treat vitamin B12 deficiency in people with pernicious anemia and other conditions.

Cyanocobalamin may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Cyomin (cyanocobalamin (injection))? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to cobalt, or if you have Leber's disease. Cyanocobalamin can lead to optic nerve damage (and possibly blindness) in people with Leber's disease.

To treat pernicious anemia, you will have to use this medication on a regular basis for the rest of your life. Not using the medication can lead to irreversible nerve damage in your spinal cord.

Pernicious anemia is also treated with folic acid to help maintain red blood cells. However, folic acid will not treat Vitamin B12 deficiency and will not prevent possible damage to the spinal cord. Take all of your medications as directed.

Your dose needs may change if you become pregnant, if you breast-feed, or if you eat a vegetarian diet. Tell your doctor about any changes in your diet or medical condition. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using Cyomin (cyanocobalamin (injection))? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to cobalt, or if you have Leber's disease. Cyanocobalamin can lead to optic nerve damage (and possibly blindness) in people with Leber's disease.

If you have any of these other conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely use cyanocobalamin injection:

any type of infection;

iron or folic acid deficiency;

kidney or liver disease; or

if you are receiving any medication or treatment that affects bone marrow.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether cyanocobalamin injection is harmful to an unborn baby. Before using this medication, tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. Cyanocobalamin passes into breast milk, but it is not known whether cyanocobalamin could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I use Cyomin (cyanocobalamin (injection))?

Use this medication exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use it in larger amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Your dose needs may change if you become pregnant, if you breast-feed, or if you eat a vegetarian diet. Tell your doctor about any changes in your diet or medical condition.

The injection form is given as a shot into a muscle or under the skin. Your doctor, nurse, or other healthcare provider will give you this injection. You may be shown how to inject your medicine at home. Do not self-inject this medicine if you do not fully understand how to give the injection and properly dispose of used needles and syringes.

Use each disposable needle only one time. Throw away used needles in a puncture-proof container (ask your pharmacist where you can get one and how to dispose of it). Keep this container out of the reach of children and pets.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition, your blood will need to be tested every 3 to 6 months. This will help your doctor determine the correct dose and how long to treat you with cyanocobalamin. Do not miss any scheduled appointments.

To treat pernicious anemia, you will have to use this medication on a regular basis for the rest of your life. Not using the medication can lead to irreversible nerve damage in your spinal cord.

Pernicious anemia is also treated with folic acid to help maintain red blood cells. However, folic acid will not treat Vitamin B12 deficiency and will not prevent possible damage to the spinal cord. Take all of your medications as directed.

Store this medication at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light. What happens if I miss a dose?

Call your doctor for instructions if you miss a dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of cyanocobalamin is not likely to cause life-threatening symptoms. What should I avoid while using Cyomin (cyanocobalamin (injection))? Avoid drinking large amounts of alcohol while you are being treated with cyanocobalamin. Cyomin (cyanocobalamin (injection)) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

chest pain;

feeling short of breath, even with mild exertion;

swelling, rapid weight gain; or

unusual warmth, redness, or pain in an arm or leg.

Less serious side effects may include:

headache, dizziness, weakness;

nausea, upset stomach, diarrhea;

numbness or tingling;

pain, swelling, redness, or irritation where the injection was given;

fever;

joint pain; or

itching or rash.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Cyomin (cyanocobalamin (injection))?

Before using cyanocobalamin, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following medications:

antibiotics;

methotrexate (Rheumatrex);

pyrimethamine (Daraprim);

colchicine; or

if you drank a lot of alcohol within the past 2 weeks.

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with cyanocobalamin. Tell your doctor about all your prescription and over-the-counter medications, vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

Where can I get more information injection? Your pharmacist can provide more information about cyanocobalamin.

See also: Cyomin side effects (in more detail)

More Cyomin resources Cyomin Side Effects (in more detail) Cyomin Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Cyomin Drug Interactions Cyomin Support Group 0 Reviews for Cyomin - Add your own review/rating Compare Cyomin with other medications B12 Nutritional Deficiency Pernicious Anemia Schilling Test Vitamin B12 Deficiency
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Cobal-1000 injection


Generic Name: cyanocobalamin (injection) (sye AN oh koe BAL a min)
Brand Names: Cobolin-M, Cyomin, Depo-Cobolin, Vitamin B-12, Vitamin B12

What is Cobal-1000 (cyanocobalamin (injection))?

Cyanocobalamin is a man-made form of vitamin B12. Vitamin B12 is important for growth, cell reproduction, blood formation, and protein and tissue synthesis.

Cyanocobalamin is used to treat vitamin B12 deficiency in people with pernicious anemia and other conditions.

Cyanocobalamin may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Cobal-1000 (cyanocobalamin (injection))? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to cobalt, or if you have Leber's disease. Cyanocobalamin can lead to optic nerve damage (and possibly blindness) in people with Leber's disease.

To treat pernicious anemia, you will have to use this medication on a regular basis for the rest of your life. Not using the medication can lead to irreversible nerve damage in your spinal cord.

Pernicious anemia is also treated with folic acid to help maintain red blood cells. However, folic acid will not treat Vitamin B12 deficiency and will not prevent possible damage to the spinal cord. Take all of your medications as directed.

Your dose needs may change if you become pregnant, if you breast-feed, or if you eat a vegetarian diet. Tell your doctor about any changes in your diet or medical condition. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using Cobal-1000 (cyanocobalamin (injection))? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to cobalt, or if you have Leber's disease. Cyanocobalamin can lead to optic nerve damage (and possibly blindness) in people with Leber's disease.

If you have any of these other conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely use cyanocobalamin injection:

any type of infection;

iron or folic acid deficiency;

kidney or liver disease; or

if you are receiving any medication or treatment that affects bone marrow.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether cyanocobalamin injection is harmful to an unborn baby. Before using this medication, tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. Cyanocobalamin passes into breast milk, but it is not known whether cyanocobalamin could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I use Cobal-1000 (cyanocobalamin (injection))?

Use this medication exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use it in larger amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Your dose needs may change if you become pregnant, if you breast-feed, or if you eat a vegetarian diet. Tell your doctor about any changes in your diet or medical condition.

The injection form is given as a shot into a muscle or under the skin. Your doctor, nurse, or other healthcare provider will give you this injection. You may be shown how to inject your medicine at home. Do not self-inject this medicine if you do not fully understand how to give the injection and properly dispose of used needles and syringes.

Use each disposable needle only one time. Throw away used needles in a puncture-proof container (ask your pharmacist where you can get one and how to dispose of it). Keep this container out of the reach of children and pets.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition, your blood will need to be tested every 3 to 6 months. This will help your doctor determine the correct dose and how long to treat you with cyanocobalamin. Do not miss any scheduled appointments.

To treat pernicious anemia, you will have to use this medication on a regular basis for the rest of your life. Not using the medication can lead to irreversible nerve damage in your spinal cord.

Pernicious anemia is also treated with folic acid to help maintain red blood cells. However, folic acid will not treat Vitamin B12 deficiency and will not prevent possible damage to the spinal cord. Take all of your medications as directed.

Store this medication at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light. What happens if I miss a dose?

Call your doctor for instructions if you miss a dose.

What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of cyanocobalamin is not likely to cause life-threatening symptoms. What should I avoid while using Cobal-1000 (cyanocobalamin (injection))? Avoid drinking large amounts of alcohol while you are being treated with cyanocobalamin. Cobal-1000 (cyanocobalamin (injection)) side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

chest pain;

feeling short of breath, even with mild exertion;

swelling, rapid weight gain; or

unusual warmth, redness, or pain in an arm or leg.

Less serious side effects may include:

headache, dizziness, weakness;

nausea, upset stomach, diarrhea;

numbness or tingling;

pain, swelling, redness, or irritation where the injection was given;

fever;

joint pain; or

itching or rash.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Cobal-1000 (cyanocobalamin (injection))?

Before using cyanocobalamin, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following medications:

antibiotics;

methotrexate (Rheumatrex);

pyrimethamine (Daraprim);

colchicine; or

if you drank a lot of alcohol within the past 2 weeks.

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with cyanocobalamin. Tell your doctor about all your prescription and over-the-counter medications, vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

Where can I get more information injection? Your pharmacist can provide more information about cyanocobalamin.

See also: Cobal-1000 side effects (in more detail)

More Cobal-1000 resources Cobal-1000 Side Effects (in more detail) Cobal-1000 Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Cobal-1000 Drug Interactions 0 Reviews for Cobal-1000 - Add your own review/rating Compare Cobal-1000 with other medications B12 Nutritional Deficiency Pernicious Anemia Schilling Test Vitamin B12 Deficiency
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Leucovorin


Pronunciation: loo-koe-VOR-in
Generic Name: Leucovorin
Brand Name: Generic only. No brands available.
Leucovorin is used for:

Reducing the toxic effects of methotrexate and certain other medicines (folic acid antagonists). It may also be used to treat other conditions as determined by your doctor.

Leucovorin is a folic acid derivative. Methotrexate and the folic acid antagonists block the body's production of folate. Leucovorin works by replacing folate in the body.

Do NOT use Leucovorin if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Leucovorin you have pernicious anemia or other anemia due to low blood levels of vitamin B12

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Before using Leucovorin:

Some medical conditions may interact with Leucovorin. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you have blood problems (eg, anemia)

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Leucovorin. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Fluorouracil because side effects and toxicity, including inflammation of the mouth or severe diarrhea, may be increased by Leucovorin Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole because effectiveness may be decreased by Leucovorin Phenobarbital, phenytoin, or primidone because effectiveness may be decreased by Leucovorin and seizure frequency may increase in some children

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Leucovorin may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Leucovorin:

Use Leucovorin as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Leucovorin may be taken with or without food. Do not miss any dose of Leucovorin. If you miss a dose of Leucovorin or vomit after taking a dose, contact your doctor immediately.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Leucovorin.

Important safety information: LAB TESTS, including blood methotrexate levels, may be performed to monitor your progress or to check for side effects. Be sure to keep all doctor and lab appointments. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: If you plan on becoming pregnant, discuss with your doctor the risks and benefits of using Leucovorin during pregnancy. It is unknown if Leucovorin is excreted in breast milk. If you are or will be breast-feeding while you are using Leucovorin, check with your doctor or pharmacist to discuss the risks to your baby. Possible side effects of Leucovorin:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. When used in small doses, no COMMON side effects have been reported with Leucovorin. Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); fainting; seizures.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

See also: Leucovorin side effects (in more detail)

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center, or emergency room immediately.

Proper storage of Leucovorin:

Store Leucovorin at room temperature, between 59 and 77 degrees F (15 and 25 degrees C). Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Leucovorin out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Leucovorin, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Leucovorin is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about Leucovorin. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Leucovorin resources Leucovorin Side Effects (in more detail) Leucovorin Dosage Leucovorin Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Leucovorin Drug Interactions Leucovorin Support Group 0 Reviews for Leucovorin - Add your own review/rating leucovorin Oral, Intravenous, Injection Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information leucovorin Concise Consumer Information (Cerner Multum) Leucovorin Calcium Monograph (AHFS DI) Compare Leucovorin with other medications Anemia, Megaloblastic Colorectal Cancer Folic Acid Antagonist Overdose Methotrexate Rescue Pneumocystis Pneumonia Pneumocystis Pneumonia Prophylaxis Toxoplasmosis Toxoplasmosis, Prophylaxis
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Iron/Succinic Acid/Folic Acid


Pronunciation: EYE-urn/suk-SIN-ik AS-id/FOE-lik AS-id
Generic Name: Iron/Succinic Acid/Folic Acid
Brand Name: Irospan 24/6

Accidental overdose of products that contain iron is a leading cause of fatal poisoning in children younger than 6 years old. Keep this and all medicines out of the reach of children. In case of accidental ingestion, call the poison control center or a doctor right away.


Iron/Succinic Acid/Folic Acid is used for:

Treating certain types of anemia that can be helped by increasing the amount of iron in the body (eg, anemia caused by pregnancy, blood loss, low dietary iron, metabolic disease, surgery). It may also be used for other conditions as determined by your doctor.

Iron/Succinic Acid/Folic Acid is a combination of vitamins and minerals. It works by replacing iron in the body.

Do NOT use Iron/Succinic Acid/Folic Acid if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Iron/Succinic Acid/Folic Acid you have too much iron in your body (eg, hemosiderosis, hemochromatosis) you have a certain type of anemia called hemolytic anemia

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Before using Iron/Succinic Acid/Folic Acid:

Some medical conditions may interact with Iron/Succinic Acid/Folic Acid. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you have another type of anemia (eg, pernicious anemia, megaloblastic anemia) if you have stomach or bowel problems (eg, inflammation, Crohn disease, ulcer), metabolism problems, porphyria, or a certain blood disease (thalassemia) if you have had multiple blood transfusions

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Iron/Succinic Acid/Folic Acid. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Fluorouracil because the risk of its side effects may be increased by Iron/Succinic Acid/Folic Acid Hydantoins (eg, phenytoin), methyldopa, penicillamine, or thyroid hormones (eg, levothyroxine) because their effectiveness may be decreased by Iron/Succinic Acid/Folic Acid

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Iron/Succinic Acid/Folic Acid may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Iron/Succinic Acid/Folic Acid:

Use Iron/Succinic Acid/Folic Acid as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Take Iron/Succinic Acid/Folic Acid by mouth with or without food. If stomach upset occurs, take with food to reduce stomach irritation. Each carton of Iron/Succinic Acid/Folic Acid contains 30 tablets consisting of 24 light blue tablets and 6 white tablets. Take 1 light blue tablet daily for 24 days followed by 1 white tablet daily for 6 days, unless directed otherwise by your doctor. If you also take antacids, bisphosphonates (eg, ibandronate), cefdinir, eltrombopag, methyldopa, penicillamine, a quinolone antibiotic (eg, ciprofloxacin), or a tetracycline antibiotic (eg, doxycycline, minocycline), ask your doctor or pharmacist how to take it with Iron/Succinic Acid/Folic Acid. If you miss a dose of Iron/Succinic Acid/Folic Acid, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Iron/Succinic Acid/Folic Acid.

Important safety information: Do NOT take more than the recommended dose or use for longer than prescribed without checking with your doctor. Do not take large doses of vitamins (megadoses or megavitamin therapy) while you take Iron/Succinic Acid/Folic Acid unless your doctor tells you to. Iron/Succinic Acid/Folic Acid may cause your stools to darken. This is normal and not a cause for concern. Iron/Succinic Acid/Folic Acid has many vitamins and minerals in it. Before you start any new medicine, check the label to see if it has the same vitamins and minerals in it too. If it does or if you are not sure, check with your doctor or pharmacist. Iron/Succinic Acid/Folic Acid may interfere with certain lab tests, such as tests used to check for blood in the stool. Make sure your doctor and lab personnel know you are using Iron/Succinic Acid/Folic Acid. Lab tests, including blood counts and iron levels, may be performed while you use Iron/Succinic Acid/Folic Acid. These tests may be used to monitor your condition or check for side effects. Be sure to keep all doctor and lab appointments. Iron/Succinic Acid/Folic Acid should not be used in CHILDREN younger than 18 years old; safety and effectiveness in children have not been confirmed. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: If you become pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Iron/Succinic Acid/Folic Acid while you are pregnant. Iron/Succinic Acid/Folic Acid is found in breast milk. If you are or will be breast-feeding while you use Iron/Succinic Acid/Folic Acid, check with your doctor. Discuss any possible risks to your baby. Possible side effects of Iron/Succinic Acid/Folic Acid:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Constipation; darkened stools; diarrhea; mild stomach pain; nausea; vomiting.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); black, tarry stools; blood or streaks of blood in the stool; severe or persistent vomiting or stomach pain.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center, or emergency room immediately. Symptoms may include black, tarry stools; chest pain; coma; dizziness; fast heartbeat; fever; increased or decreased urination; increased thirst or hunger; seizures; severe nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, or stomach pain; shortness of breath; sluggishness; trouble breathing; unusual tiredness or drowsiness; unusually pale skin; weak pulse.

Proper storage of Iron/Succinic Acid/Folic Acid:

Store Iron/Succinic Acid/Folic Acid at room temperature, between 59 and 86 degrees F (15 and 30 degrees C). Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Iron/Succinic Acid/Folic Acid out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Iron/Succinic Acid/Folic Acid, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Iron/Succinic Acid/Folic Acid is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about Iron/Succinic Acid/Folic Acid. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Iron/Succinic Acid/Folic Acid resources Iron/Succinic Acid/Folic Acid Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Iron/Succinic Acid/Folic Acid Drug Interactions Iron/Succinic Acid/Folic Acid Support Group 11 Reviews for Iron/Succinic Acid/Folic Acid - Add your own review/rating Compare Iron/Succinic Acid/Folic Acid with other medications Anemia Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation and Deficiency
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NovaFerrum


Pronunciation: EYE-urn/VYE-ta-min C/FOE-lik AS-id
Generic Name: Iron/Vitamin C/Folic Acid
Brand Name: NovaFerrum

Accidental overdose of products that contain iron is a leading cause of fatal poisoning in children younger than 6 years old. Keep this and all medicines out of the reach of children. In case of accidental ingestion, call the poison control center or a doctor at once.


NovaFerrum is used for:

Preventing and treating anemia caused by low levels of iron in the body (iron deficiency anemia). It may also be used for other conditions as determined by your doctor.

NovaFerrum is a vitamin, iron, and folic acid combination. It works by providing vitamins, iron, and folic acid to the body to help meet nutritional requirements.

Do NOT use NovaFerrum if: you are allergic to any ingredient in NovaFerrum you have high levels of iron in your body (eg, hemosiderosis, hemochromatosis) or you have a certain type of anemia (hemolytic anemia)

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Before using NovaFerrum:

Some medical conditions may interact with NovaFerrum. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you have another type of anemia (eg, pernicious anemia, megaloblastic anemia) if you have stomach or bowel problems (eg, inflammation, Crohn disease, ulcer), metabolism problems, porphyria, or a blood disease (eg, thalassemia) if you have had multiple blood transfusions

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with NovaFerrum. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Fluorouracil because the risk of its side effects may be increased by NovaFerrum Doxycycline, hydantoins (eg, phenytoin), mycophenolate, penicillamine, or thyroid hormones (eg, levothyroxine) because their effectiveness may be decreased by NovaFerrum

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if NovaFerrum may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use NovaFerrum:

Use NovaFerrum as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Take NovaFerrum by mouth with or without food. If stomach upset occurs, take with food to reduce stomach irritation. Use a measuring device marked for medicine dosing. Ask your pharmacist for help if you are unsure of how to measure your dose. Many medicines (eg, used for infection, blood pressure, immune system suppression, low blood platelets, osteoporosis, thyroid problems) should not be taken at the same time as NovaFerrum because their effectiveness may be decreased. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if your dose of NovaFerrum should be separated from your dose of any of your other medicines. Taking NovaFerrum at the same time each day will help you remember to take it. Take NovaFerrum on a regular schedule to get the most benefit from it. If you miss a dose of NovaFerrum, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use NovaFerrum.

Important safety information: NovaFerrum has iron in it. Iron overdose is a leading cause of fatal poisoning in children younger than 6 years old. In case of an overdose, call a doctor or poison control center right away. Do NOT take more than the recommended dose or use for longer than prescribed without checking with your doctor. Do not take large doses of vitamins while you use NovaFerrum unless your doctor tells you to. NovaFerrum may cause your stools to darken. This is normal and not a cause for concern. NovaFerrum may interfere with certain lab tests, such as tests used to check for blood in the stool. Make sure your doctor and lab personnel know you are using NovaFerrum. Lab tests, including complete blood cell counts and iron levels, may be performed while you use NovaFerrum. These tests may be used to monitor your condition or check for side effects. Be sure to keep all doctor and lab appointments. NovaFerrum should be used with extreme caution in CHILDREN; safety and effectiveness in children have not been confirmed. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: If you become pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using NovaFerrum while you are pregnant. NovaFerrum is found in breast milk. If you are or will be breast-feeding while you use NovaFerrum, check with your doctor. Discuss any possible risks to your baby. Possible side effects of NovaFerrum:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Constipation; darkened stools; diarrhea; mild stomach pain; nausea; vomiting.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); black, bloody, or tarry stools; severe or persistent vomiting or stomach pain.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

See also: NovaFerrum side effects (in more detail)

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center, or emergency room immediately. Symptoms may include black, tarry stools; chest pain; coma; dizziness; fast heartbeat; fever; increased or decreased urination; increased thirst or hunger; seizures; severe nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, or stomach pain; shortness of breath; sluggishness; trouble breathing; unusual tiredness or drowsiness; unusually pale skin; weak pulse.

Proper storage of NovaFerrum:

Store NovaFerrum in the refrigerator, between 36 and 46 degrees F (2 and 8 degrees C). Do not freeze. Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Throw away any unused medicine after 30 days. Keep NovaFerrum out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about NovaFerrum, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. NovaFerrum is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about NovaFerrum. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More NovaFerrum resources NovaFerrum Side Effects (in more detail) NovaFerrum Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding NovaFerrum Drug Interactions NovaFerrum Support Group 0 Reviews for NovaFerrum - Add your own review/rating NovaFerrum Prescribing Information (FDA) multivitamin with iron Concise Consumer Information (Cerner Multum) Allbee-C 800 with Iron Concise Consumer Information (Cerner Multum) Ferotrin Prescribing Information (FDA) Ferralet 90 Prescribing Information (FDA) Ferrex 150 Forte Prescribing Information (FDA) Ferrex 150 Forte Plus Prescribing Information (FDA) Ferrex 28 Prescribing Information (FDA) FerroGels Forte Prescribing Information (FDA) Hematogen Forte Prescribing Information (FDA) Integra F Prescribing Information (FDA) Integra Plus Prescribing Information (FDA) Irospan 24/6 Prescribing Information (FDA) Tricon Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare NovaFerrum with other medications Anemia Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation and Deficiency
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Anemagen


Pronunciation: EYE-urn/sux-IN-ic AS-id/VYE-ta-min C/VYE-ta-min B 12/DES-ih-kay-ted STUH-mak SUB-stans
Generic Name: Iron/Succinic Acid/Vitamin C/Vitamin B12/Desiccated Stomach Substance
Brand Name: Examples include Anemagen and Chromagen

Accidental overdose of products that contain iron is a leading cause of fatal poisoning in children younger than 6 years old. Keep this and all medicines out of the reach of children. In case of accidental ingestion, call the poison control center or a doctor at once.


Anemagen is used for:

Treating certain types of anemia that can be helped by increasing the amount of iron in the body (eg, anemia caused by pregnancy, blood loss, low dietary iron, metabolic disease, surgery). It may also be used for other conditions as determined by your doctor.

Anemagen is a combination of vitamins and minerals. It works by replacing iron in the body.

Do NOT use Anemagen if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Anemagen you have too much iron in your body (eg, hemochromatosis, hemosiderosis)

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Before using Anemagen:

Some medical conditions may interact with Anemagen. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you have another type of anemia (eg, hemolytic anemia, megaloblastic anemia, pernicious anemia) if you have stomach or bowel problems (eg, Crohn disease, inflammation, ulcer), metabolism problems, porphyria, or a blood disease (eg, thalassemia) if you have had multiple blood transfusions

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Anemagen. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Doxycycline, penicillamine, or thyroid hormones (eg, levothyroxine) because their effectiveness may be decreased by Anemagen

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Anemagen may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Anemagen:

Use Anemagen as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Take Anemagen by mouth with or without food. If stomach upset occurs, take with food to reduce stomach irritation. Swallow Anemagen whole. Do not break, crush, or chew before swallowing. Take Anemagen with a full glass of water (8 oz/240 mL). Do not lie down for 30 minutes after taking Anemagen. If you also take antacids, bisphosphonates (eg, etidronate), cephalosporins (eg, cefdinir), doxycycline, hydantoins (eg, phenytoin), levodopa, methyldopa, penicillamine, quinolones (eg, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin), tetracyclines (eg, minocycline), or thyroid hormones (eg, levothyroxine), ask your doctor or pharmacist how to take them with Anemagen. If you miss a dose of Anemagen, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Anemagen.

Important safety information: Do NOT take more than the recommended dose or use for longer than prescribed without checking with your doctor. Do not take large doses of vitamins while you take Anemagen unless your doctor tells you to. Anemagen may cause your stools to darken. This is normal and not a cause for concern. Anemagen may interfere with certain lab tests, such as tests used to check for blood in the stool. Make sure your doctor and lab personnel know you are using Anemagen. Lab tests, including blood counts and iron levels, may be performed while you use Anemagen. These tests may be used to monitor your condition or check for side effects. Be sure to keep all doctor and lab appointments. Anemagen should be used with extreme caution in CHILDREN; safety and effectiveness in children have not been confirmed. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: If you become pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Anemagen while you are pregnant. Anemagen is found in breast milk. If you are or will be breast-feeding while you use Anemagen, check with your doctor. Discuss any possible risks to your baby. Possible side effects of Anemagen:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Constipation; darkened or green stools; diarrhea; nausea; stomach upset; vomiting.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); black, tarry stools; blood or streaks of blood in the stool; severe or persistent vomiting or stomach pain.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

See also: Anemagen side effects (in more detail)

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center, or emergency room immediately. Symptoms may include black, tarry stools; chest pain; coma; dizziness; fast heartbeat; fever; increased or decreased urination; increased thirst or hunger; seizures; severe nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, or stomach pain; shortness of breath; sluggishness; trouble breathing; unusual tiredness or drowsiness; unusually pale skin; weak pulse.

Proper storage of Anemagen:

Store Anemagen at 77 degrees F (25 degrees C). Brief storage at temperatures between 59 and 86 degrees F (15 and 30 degrees C) is permitted. Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Anemagen out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Anemagen, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Anemagen is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about Anemagen. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Anemagen resources Anemagen Side Effects (in more detail) Anemagen Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Anemagen Drug Interactions Anemagen Support Group 0 Reviews for Anemagen - Add your own review/rating multivitamin with iron Concise Consumer Information (Cerner Multum) Allbee-C 800 with Iron Concise Consumer Information (Cerner Multum) Ferotrin Prescribing Information (FDA) Ferralet 90 Prescribing Information (FDA) Ferrex 150 Forte Prescribing Information (FDA) Ferrex 150 Forte Plus Prescribing Information (FDA) Ferrex 28 Prescribing Information (FDA) FerroGels Forte Prescribing Information (FDA) Hematogen Forte Prescribing Information (FDA) Integra F Prescribing Information (FDA) Integra Plus Prescribing Information (FDA) Irospan 24/6 Prescribing Information (FDA) NovaFerrum Prescribing Information (FDA) Tricon Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare Anemagen with other medications Anemia Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation and Deficiency
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Chromagen


Pronunciation: EYE-urn/sux-IN-ic AS-id/VYE-ta-min C/VYE-ta-min B 12/DES-ih-kay-ted STUH-mak SUB-stans
Generic Name: Iron/Succinic Acid/Vitamin C/Vitamin B12/Desiccated Stomach Substance
Brand Name: Examples include Anemagen and Chromagen

Accidental overdose of products that contain iron is a leading cause of fatal poisoning in children younger than 6 years old. Keep this and all medicines out of the reach of children. In case of accidental ingestion, call the poison control center or a doctor at once.


Chromagen is used for:

Treating certain types of anemia that can be helped by increasing the amount of iron in the body (eg, anemia caused by pregnancy, blood loss, low dietary iron, metabolic disease, surgery). It may also be used for other conditions as determined by your doctor.

Chromagen is a combination of vitamins and minerals. It works by replacing iron in the body.

Do NOT use Chromagen if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Chromagen you have too much iron in your body (eg, hemochromatosis, hemosiderosis)

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Before using Chromagen:

Some medical conditions may interact with Chromagen. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you have another type of anemia (eg, hemolytic anemia, megaloblastic anemia, pernicious anemia) if you have stomach or bowel problems (eg, Crohn disease, inflammation, ulcer), metabolism problems, porphyria, or a blood disease (eg, thalassemia) if you have had multiple blood transfusions

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Chromagen. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Doxycycline, penicillamine, or thyroid hormones (eg, levothyroxine) because their effectiveness may be decreased by Chromagen

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Chromagen may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Chromagen:

Use Chromagen as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Take Chromagen by mouth with or without food. If stomach upset occurs, take with food to reduce stomach irritation. Swallow Chromagen whole. Do not break, crush, or chew before swallowing. Take Chromagen with a full glass of water (8 oz/240 mL). Do not lie down for 30 minutes after taking Chromagen. If you also take antacids, bisphosphonates (eg, etidronate), cephalosporins (eg, cefdinir), doxycycline, hydantoins (eg, phenytoin), levodopa, methyldopa, penicillamine, quinolones (eg, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin), tetracyclines (eg, minocycline), or thyroid hormones (eg, levothyroxine), ask your doctor or pharmacist how to take them with Chromagen. If you miss a dose of Chromagen, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Chromagen.

Important safety information: Do NOT take more than the recommended dose or use for longer than prescribed without checking with your doctor. Do not take large doses of vitamins while you take Chromagen unless your doctor tells you to. Chromagen may cause your stools to darken. This is normal and not a cause for concern. Chromagen may interfere with certain lab tests, such as tests used to check for blood in the stool. Make sure your doctor and lab personnel know you are using Chromagen. Lab tests, including blood counts and iron levels, may be performed while you use Chromagen. These tests may be used to monitor your condition or check for side effects. Be sure to keep all doctor and lab appointments. Chromagen should be used with extreme caution in CHILDREN; safety and effectiveness in children have not been confirmed. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: If you become pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Chromagen while you are pregnant. Chromagen is found in breast milk. If you are or will be breast-feeding while you use Chromagen, check with your doctor. Discuss any possible risks to your baby. Possible side effects of Chromagen:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Constipation; darkened or green stools; diarrhea; nausea; stomach upset; vomiting.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); black, tarry stools; blood or streaks of blood in the stool; severe or persistent vomiting or stomach pain.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

See also: Chromagen side effects (in more detail)

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center, or emergency room immediately. Symptoms may include black, tarry stools; chest pain; coma; dizziness; fast heartbeat; fever; increased or decreased urination; increased thirst or hunger; seizures; severe nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, or stomach pain; shortness of breath; sluggishness; trouble breathing; unusual tiredness or drowsiness; unusually pale skin; weak pulse.

Proper storage of Chromagen:

Store Chromagen at 77 degrees F (25 degrees C). Brief storage at temperatures between 59 and 86 degrees F (15 and 30 degrees C) is permitted. Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep Chromagen out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Chromagen, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Chromagen is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about Chromagen. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Chromagen resources Chromagen Side Effects (in more detail) Chromagen Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Chromagen Drug Interactions Chromagen Support Group 0 Reviews for Chromagen - Add your own review/rating multivitamin with iron Concise Consumer Information (Cerner Multum) Allbee-C 800 with Iron Concise Consumer Information (Cerner Multum) Ferotrin Prescribing Information (FDA) Ferralet 90 Prescribing Information (FDA) Ferrex 150 Forte Prescribing Information (FDA) Ferrex 150 Forte Plus Prescribing Information (FDA) Ferrex 28 Prescribing Information (FDA) FerroGels Forte Prescribing Information (FDA) Hematogen Forte Prescribing Information (FDA) Integra F Prescribing Information (FDA) Integra Plus Prescribing Information (FDA) Irospan 24/6 Prescribing Information (FDA) NovaFerrum Prescribing Information (FDA) Tricon Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare Chromagen with other medications Anemia Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation and Deficiency
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ED Cyte F


Pronunciation: DOK-yoo-sate SO-dee-um/FER-us FYOO-mar-rate/FOE-lik AS-id
Generic Name: Docusate Sodium/Ferrous Fumarate/Folic Acid
Brand Name: ED Cyte F
ED Cyte F is used for:

Treating anemia caused by low levels of iron or folate in the blood. It is also used in pregnancy for the prevention and treatment of low blood levels of iron and to supply folic acid to the body. It may also be used for other conditions as determined by your doctor.

ED Cyte F is an iron and folic acid combination plus a stool softener. It works by replacing or adding iron and folic acid when the body does not produce enough of its own. The stool softener is used to relieve constipation caused by iron.

Do NOT use ED Cyte F if: you are allergic to any ingredient in ED Cyte F you have pernicious anemia or you have too much iron in the body

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Before using ED Cyte F:

Some medical conditions may interact with ED Cyte F. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances if you have stomach or intestinal problems (eg, ulcer, intestinal irritation or inflammation, Crohn disease, diverticulitis) if you have had multiple blood transfusions, anemia, or a blood disorder (eg, thalassemia, porphyria)

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with ED Cyte F. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

Doxycycline, hydantoins (eg, phenytoin), mycophenolate, penicillamine, tetracyclines, or thyroid hormones (eg, levothyroxine) because their effectiveness may be decreased by ED Cyte F Fluorouracil because the risk of its side effects may be increased by ED Cyte F

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if ED Cyte F may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use ED Cyte F:

Use ED Cyte F as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Take ED Cyte F by mouth with or without food. If stomach upset occurs, take with food to reduce stomach irritation. If you also take a bisphosphonate (eg, alendronate), a cephalosporin (eg, cephalexin), methyldopa, penicillamine, a quinolone (eg, ciprofloxacin), or a tetracycline (eg, minocycline), you may need to space the doses several hours apart. Check with your doctor if you have questions about how much time is needed between doses of ED Cyte F and your other medicines. Do not take an antacid within 1 hour before or 2 hours after you take ED Cyte F. Avoid eggs, whole grain breads or cereal, milk, milk products, coffee, or tea within 2 hours before or after taking ED Cyte F. These foods may reduce absorption of ED Cyte F. Take ED Cyte F with a full glass of water (8 oz/240 mL). Do not lie down for 30 minutes after taking ED Cyte F. If you miss a dose of ED Cyte F, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use ED Cyte F.

Important safety information: ED Cyte F has iron in it. Iron overdose is a leading cause of fatal poisoning in children younger than 6 years of age. In case of an overdose, call a doctor or poison control center right away. Do not take large doses of vitamins while you use ED Cyte F unless your doctor tells you to. Do NOT take more than the recommended dose or use for longer than 6 months without checking with your doctor. ED Cyte F may darken the stools. This is normal and not a cause for concern. Lab tests, including complete blood cell counts, may be performed while you use ED Cyte F. These tests may be used to monitor your condition or check for side effects. Be sure to keep all doctor and lab appointments. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: If you become pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using ED Cyte F while you are pregnant. ED Cyte F is found in breast milk. If you are or will be breast-feeding while you use ED Cyte F, check with your doctor. Discuss any possible risks to your baby. Possible side effects of ED Cyte F:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Constipation; darkened or green stools; diarrhea; indigestion; nausea; stomach cramps; vomiting.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); black, tarry stools; blood or streaks of blood in the stool; fever; vomiting with continuing stomach pain.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

See also: ED Cyte F side effects (in more detail)

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center, or emergency room immediately. Symptoms may include bloody stools; blue or pale skin; loss of consciousness; severe drowsiness; severe or persistent nausea or vomiting.

Proper storage of ED Cyte F:

Store ED Cyte F at room temperature, between 59 and 86 degrees F (15 and 30 degrees C). Store away from heat, moisture, and light. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep ED Cyte F out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about ED Cyte F, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. ED Cyte F is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about ED Cyte F. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More ED Cyte F resources ED Cyte F Side Effects (in more detail) ED Cyte F Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding ED Cyte F Drug Interactions ED Cyte F Support Group 0 Reviews for ED Cyte F - Add your own review/rating Ed Cyte F Concise Consumer Information (Cerner Multum) Compare ED Cyte F with other medications Anemia Associated with Iron Deficiency Iron Deficiency Anemia
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Aranesp


Pronunciation: DAR-be-POE-e-tin AL-fa (POL-ee-SOR-bate)
Generic Name: Darbepoetin Alfa (Polysorbate 80)
Brand Name: Aranesp

Clinical studies have shown Aranesp to increase the risk of serious side effects (eg, blood clots, stroke, heart attack, heart failure) and death in some cases. It has also been shown to shorten overall survival and/or increase the risk of tumor growth or recurrence in patients with certain types of cancer. Talk with your doctor about the risks and benefits of using Aranesp. Do not use more than the recommended dose without checking with your doctor.


Aranesp is used for:

Treating anemia in certain patients with chronic kidney disease. It is also used to treat anemia caused by chemotherapy in certain cancer patients. It may also be used for other conditions as determined by your doctor.

Aranesp is a synthetic erythropoietin analog. It works by stimulating the bone marrow to produce more red blood cells.

Do NOT use Aranesp if: you are allergic to any ingredient in Aranesp, including if you have had a severe allergic reaction (eg, rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue; unusual hoarseness) to Aranesp you have uncontrolled high blood pressure you have developed a certain type of anemia called pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) after receiving a previous dose of Aranesp or other erythropoietin protein medicines (eg, epoetin)

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Before using Aranesp:

Some medical conditions may interact with Aranesp. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances, including latex if you have a history of cancer, seizures, kidney problems (eg, decreased kidney function, kidney failure), blood problems (eg, sickle cell anemia, porphyria, hemolytic anemia, thalassemia), bleeding or clotting problems, stroke, heart attack or other heart problems (eg, congestive heart failure, ischemic heart disease), diabetes, or high blood pressure if you have blood in your stools; an inflection or recent injury; certain bone problems (eg, osteofibrosis cystica); an inflammatory condition (eg, bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis); low blood iron, folic acid, or vitamin B12 levels; or high blood aluminum levels if you are on hemodialysis, have recently had surgery, or are scheduled to have surgery

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Aranesp. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicine.

Ask your health care provider if Aranesp may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

How to use Aranesp:

Use Aranesp as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

Aranesp comes with an extra patient information sheet called a Medication Guide. Read it carefully. Read it again each time you get Aranesp refilled. Aranesp is usually given as an injection at your doctor's office, hospital, or clinic. If you will be using Aranesp at home, a health care provider will teach you how to use it. Be sure you understand how to use Aranesp. Follow the procedures you are taught when you use a dose. Contact your health care provider if you have any questions. Do not use Aranesp if it contains particles, is cloudy or discolored, or if the vial is cracked or damaged. Do not shake Aranesp. Do not use Aranesp if it has been shaken. Do not use Aranesp if it has been frozen. Do not dilute or mix Aranesp with any other solutions or medicines. Discard any unused portion of medicine left in the vial or syringe. Use only disposable syringes and needles. Use the syringes and needles only once and dispose of them in a puncture-proof container as instructed by your health care provider. Choose a new site each time you inject Aranesp. Do not inject into an area that is tender, red, bruised, hard, swollen, or has scars or stretch marks. Keep this product, as well as syringes and needles, out of the reach of children and pets. Do not reuse needles, syringes, or other materials. Ask your health care provider how to dispose of these materials after use. Follow all local rules for disposal. If you miss a dose of Aranesp, contact your doctor right away.

Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use Aranesp.

Important safety information: Aranesp may cause dizziness. This effect may be worse if you take it with alcohol or certain medicines. Use Aranesp with caution. Do not drive or perform other possibly unsafe tasks until you know how you react to it. Do NOT use more than the recommended dose without checking with your doctor. It is important to keep your blood pressure under control while you use Aranesp. Do not stop taking any of your blood pressure medicines without checking with your doctor. Closely follow your doctor's instructions for diet and blood pressure monitoring. It may take 2 to 6 weeks for Aranesp to work. Do not stop taking Aranesp without checking with your doctor. Tell your doctor immediately if symptoms of anemia persist or recur, such as increased fatigue/weakness or pale skin color. Lab tests, including blood pressure, kidney function, hemoglobin levels, and iron studies, may be performed while you use Aranesp. These tests may be used to monitor your condition or check for side effects. Be sure to keep all doctor and lab appointments. Aranesp should be used with extreme caution in CHILDREN younger than 1 year old with chronic kidney disease or in CHILDREN with cancer; safety and effectiveness in these children have not been confirmed. PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: If you become pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Aranesp while you are pregnant. It is not known if Aranesp is found in breast milk. If you are or will be breast-feeding while you use Aranesp, check with your doctor. Discuss any possible risks to your baby. Possible side effects of Aranesp:

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Cough; mild pain at the injection site; mild stomach pain.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue; unusual hoarseness); chest, jaw, or left arm pain; confusion; coughing up blood; fainting; fast or irregular heartbeat; new or worsening pale skin color, or tiredness or weakness; numbness of an arm or leg; one-sided weakness; redness, pain, tenderness, or swelling of the calf or leg; seizures; severe or persistent pain or irritation at the injection site; severe or persistent stomach pain; shortness of breath; sudden, severe headache, dizziness, or vomiting; sudden trouble walking or loss of balance or coordination; swelling of the arms or legs; vision or speech problems; weight gain.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the appropriate agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

See also: Aranesp side effects (in more detail)

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

Contact 1-800-222-1222 (the American Association of Poison Control Centers), your local poison control center, or emergency room immediately. Symptoms may include severe or persistent headache or dizziness.

Proper storage of Aranesp:

Aranesp is usually handled and stored by a health care provider. If you are using Aranesp at home, store Aranesp as directed by your pharmacist or health care provider. Keep Aranesp out of the reach of children and away from pets.

General information: If you have any questions about Aranesp, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Aranesp is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. Do not share it with other people. If your symptoms do not improve or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Check with your pharmacist about how to dispose of unused medicine.

This information is a summary only. It does not contain all information about Aranesp. If you have questions about the medicine you are taking or would like more information, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Issue Date: February 1, 2012 Database Edition 12.1.1.002 Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. More Aranesp resources Aranesp Side Effects (in more detail) Aranesp Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Aranesp Drug Interactions Aranesp Support Group 1 Review for Aranesp - Add your own review/rating Compare Aranesp with other medications Anemia Associated with Chronic Renal Failure Anemia, Chemotherapy Induced
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