There are currently no drugs listed for "Urethral Stricture with Infection".

Learn more about Urethral Stricture with Infection

Medical Encyclopedia:

Urethral stricture



1. Name Of The Medicinal Product

Ultravist® 300

2. Qualitative And Quantitative Composition

1ml contains 623mg of iopromide (equivalent to 300mg iodine).

3. Pharmaceutical Form

Aqueous solution for injection.

4. Clinical Particulars 4.1 Therapeutic Indications

X-ray contrast medium for computerised tomography, digital subtraction angiography, intravenous urography, venography (phlebography), arteriography, arthrography, hysterosalpingography and fistulography.

4.2 Posology And Method Of Administration

• General information

Experience shows that contrast medium is tolerated better if it is warmed to body temperature.

Intravenous urography

Adults: The minimum dose is 0.8ml/kg body weight Ultravist 370, (1ml/kg Ultravist 300 or 1.3ml/kg Ultravist 240). These doses should provide adequate filling of the ureters. It may be necessary to increase the dose in individual cases.

Children: The poor concentrating ability of the immature nephron of infantile kidneys necessitates the use of relatively high doses of contrast medium, i.e. for Ultravist 300:

Neonates: 4.0 ml/kg body weight Babies: 3.0 ml/kg body weight Small children: 1.5 ml/kg body weight

Computerised tomography

Cranial CT: The following dosages are recommended for cranial CT:

Ultravist 240: 1.5-2.5ml/kg body weight Ultravist 300: 1-2ml/kg body weight Ultravist 370: 1-1.5ml/kg body weight

Whole-body CT: For whole-body computerised tomography, the doses of contrast medium and the rates of administration depend on the organs under investigation, the diagnostic problem and, in particular, the different scan and image-reconstruction times of the scanners in use.

Angiography: The dosage depends on the age, weight, cardiac output and general condition of the patient, the clinical problem, examination technique and the nature and volume of the vascular region to be investigated.

The following dosages may serve as a guide:

Cerebral angiography   Aortic arch angiography 50-80 ml Ultravist 300/inj. Selective angiography 6-15 ml Ultravist 300/inj. Retrograde carotid angiography 30-40 ml Ultravist 300/inj.     Thoracic aortography: 50-80 ml Ultravist 300/inj. Abdominal aortography: 40-60 ml Ultravist 300/inj. Bifemoral arteriography: 40-60 ml Ultravist 300/inj.     Peripheral angiography:   Upper extremities:   Arteriography 8-12 ml Ultravist 300/inj. Venography 50-60 ml Ultravist 240/inj.   15-30 ml Ultravist 300/inj. Lower extremities:   Arteriography 20-30 ml Ultravist 300/inj. Venography 50-80 ml Ultravist 240/inj.   30-60 ml Ultravist 300/inj. Angiocardiography:  

Cardiac-ventriculography

40-60 ml Ultravist 370/inj. Coronary angiography: 5-8 ml Ultravist 370/inj.

Digital subtraction angiography (DSA): I.V. injection of 30-60 ml Ultravist 300 or 370 as a bolus (flow-rate: 8-12 ml/second into the cubital vein; 10-20 ml/second into the vena cava) is recommended for high-contrast demonstrations of the great vessels, of the pulmonary arteries and of the arteries of the neck, head, kidneys and extremities.

Intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography requires smaller volumes and lower iodine concentrations than the intravenous technique.

4.3 Contraindications

Uncontrolled thyrotoxicosis (see section 4.4).

4.4 Special Warnings And Precautions For Use

• Hypersensitivity reactions

As Ultravist can be associated with anaphylactoid/hypersensitivity or other idiosyncratic reactions with cardiovascular, respiratory and/or cutaneous effects, appropriate emergency drugs and equipment should be available for immediate use. It is also advisable to use a flexible indwelling cannula for intravenous contrast medium administration.

Due to an increased risk of hypersensitivity reactions, particularly careful risk/benefit judgment is required in patients:

- with known hypersensitivity to Ultravist or any excipient of Ultravist

- with a previous hypersensitivity reaction to any other iodinated contrast medium

- history of bronchial asthma or other allergic disorders.

If pre-medication is given, a corticosteroid regimen is recommended.

Allergy-like reactions range from mild to severe (including shock – see section 4.8). Most reactions occur within one hour of administration. However, as with other contrast agents, delayed reaction (after hours to days) may occur.

In order to minimise risk if a severe reaction should occur, patients

- should lie down during Ultravist administration

- must be kept under close observation for 15 minutes following the last injection as the majority of severe reactions occur at this time

- should remain in the hospital environment (but not necessarily the radiology department) for one hour after the last injection, and should be advised to return to the radiology department immediately if any symptoms develop.

If the administration does not take place on the X-ray table, any patient with a labile circulation should be brought to the X-ray machine sitting or lying down.

If hypersensitivity reactions occur, administration of the contrast medium must be stopped at once and – if necessary – specific therapy instituted intravenously. Patients who experience hypersensitivity reactions while taking beta-blockers may be resistant to treatment effects of beta agonists (see section 4.5). In the event of a severe hypersensitivity reaction, patients with cardiovascular disease are more susceptible to serious or even fatal outcomes.

• Thyroid dysfunction

Particularly careful risk/benefit judgement is required in patients with known or suspected hyperthyroidism or goitre, as iodinated contrast media may induce hyperthyroidism and thyrotoxic crisis in these patients. Testing of thyroid function prior to Ultravist administration and/or preventive thyrostatic medication may be considered in patients with known or suspected hyperthyroidism.

• Cerebral arteriosclerosis, pulmonary emphysema or poor general health

For patients with cerebral arteriosclerosis, pulmonary emphysema or poor general health, the need for examination with X-ray contrast media merits careful consideration.

• Renal impairment

Contrast media-induced nephrotoxicity, presenting as a transient impairment of renal function, may occur after intravascular administration of iodinated contrast media.

Acute renal failure may occur in rare cases.

Risk factors include, for example:

- pre-existing renal insufficiency

- dehydration

- diabetes mellitus

- multiple myeloma / paraproteinaemia

- repetitive and / or large doses of iodinated contrast media.

• Hydration

Adequate hydration should be ensured in all patients who receive Ultravist administration. This applies especially to patients with multiple myeloma, diabetes mellitus, polyuria, oliguria or gout and in babies, small children and patients in a very poor state of health. Existing disturbances of the balance of water and electrolytes must be corrected before the administration of Ultravist.

• Cardiovascular disease

There is an increased risk of clinically relevant haemodynamic changes and arrhythmia in patients with significant cardiac disease or severe coronary artery disease. In the event of a severe hypersensitivity reaction, patients with cardiovascular disease are more susceptible to serious or even fatal outcomes.

• CNS disorders

Patients with seizure history or other CNS disorders may be at increased risk of seizures and neurological complications with administration of iodinated contrast media. Neurological complications are more frequent in cerebral angiography and related procedures.

• Thromboembolic events

Non-ionic contrast media have less anticoagulant activity in-vitro than ionic media. Meticulous attention should therefore be paid to angiographic technique. Non-ionic media should not be allowed to remain in contact with blood in a syringe, and intravascular catheters should be flushed frequently with physiological saline solution (if necessary with heparin added) to minimise the risk of clotting, which has rarely led to serious thromboembolic complications of the procedure.

• Phaeochromocytoma

Premedication with an alpha-blocker is recommended in patients with phaeochromocytoma because of the risk of blood pressure crises.

• Anxiety

Experience shows that pronounced states of excitement, anxiety and pain can be the cause of side effects or intensify contrast medium-related reactions. They can be counteracted by calm management of the patient and the use of suitable drugs.

• Myelography

Ultravist should not be used in myelography.

• Hysterosalpingography

Hysterosalpingography must not be carried out during pregnancy or in patients with acute inflammatory conditions in the pelvic cavity.

4.5 Interaction With Other Medicinal Products And Other Forms Of Interaction

Biguanides (metformin): Diabetic nephropathy may predispose to renal impairment following intravascular contrast medium administration. This may precipitate lactic acidosis in patients who are taking biguanides. As a precaution, biguanides should be stopped 48 hours prior to the contrast medium examination and reinstated only after control of renal function has been regained.

Beta-blockers: Patients who experience hypersensitivity reactions while taking beta-blockers may be resistant to treatment effects of beta agonists (see section 4.4).

Interleukin: The prevalence of delayed reactions (e.g. fever, rash, flu-like symptoms, joint pain and pruritus) to contrast media is higher in patients who have received interleukin.

Radioisotopes: If iodine isotopes are to be administered for the diagnosis of thyroid disease, it should be borne in mind that after the administration of iodinated contrast media which are excreted via the kidneys, the capacity of the thyroid tissue to take up iodine will be reduced for 2 weeks and sometimes up to 6 weeks.

4.6 Pregnancy And Lactation

X-ray examinations should, if possible, be avoided during pregnancy. It has not yet been proved beyond question that Ultravist may be used without hesitation in pregnant patients. Therefore, an examination with a contrast medium during pregnancy should be carried out only if considered absolutely necessary by the physician.

It is not known whether Ultravist enters the breast milk.

4.7 Effects On Ability To Drive And Use Machines

There is no known effect on the ability to drive or operate machines. However, because of the risk of reactions, driving or operating machinery is not advisable for one hour after the last injection (see Section 4.4).

4.8 Undesirable Effects

Undesirable effects in association with the use of iodinated contrast media are usually mild to moderate and transient in nature. However, severe and life-threatening reactions as well as deaths have been reported. Nausea, headache, a sensation of pain and a general feeling of warmth are the most frequently recorded reactions.

System organ class

Common

(

Uncommon

(

Rare

(< 1/1,000)

Immunological

 

 

Anaphylactoid reactions / hypersensitivity

Anaphylactoid shock (including fatal cases)

Endocrine

 

 

 

 

Alteration in thyroid function, thyrotoxic crisis

Nervous, Psychiatric

 

 

Dizziness, restlessness

Paraesthesia / hypoaesthesia, confusion, anxiety, agitation, amnesia, speech disorders, somnolence, unconciousness, coma, tremor, convulsion, paresis / paralysis, cerebral ischaemia / infarction, stroke.

Transient cortical blindnessa

Eye

 

 

Blurred / disturbed vision

Conjunctivitis, lacrimation.

Ear

 

 

 

 

Hearing disorders.

Cardiac

 

 

Arrhythmia

Palpitations, chest pain / tightness, bradycardia, tachycardia, cardiac arrest, heart failure, myocardial ischaemia/infarction, cyanosis.

Vascular

 

 

Vasodilatation

Hypotension, hypertension, shock.

Vasospasm,a thromboembolic eventsa

Respiratory

 

 

Sneezing, coughing

Rhinitis, dyspnoea, mucosal swelling, asthma, hoarseness, laryngeal / pharyngeal / tongue / face oedema, bronchospasm, laryngeal/pharyngeal spasm, pulmonary oedema, respiratory insufficiency, respiratory arrest.

Gastrointestinal

Nausea

Vomiting, taste disturbance

Throat irritation , dysphagia, swelling of salivary glands, abdominal pain, diarrhoea

Skin and subcutaneous tissue

 

 

Urticaria, pruritus, rash, erythema

Angioedema, mucocutaneous syndrome (e.g. Stevens-Johnson's or Lyell's syndrome)

Renal and urinary

 

 

Renal impairmenta

Acute renal failurea

General disorders and administration site conditions

Heat or pain sensations, headache

Malaise, chills, sweating, vasovagal reactions

Pallor, body temperature alterations, oedema

Local pain, mild warmth and oedema, inflammation and tissue injury in case of extravasation

a intravascular use only

     

Frequency estimates are based on data obtained in pre-marketing studies in more than 3900 patients and post-marketing studies in more than 74000 patients, as well as data from spontaneous reporting and literature. (Frequency estimations are based predominantly on intravascular use.).

4.9 Overdose

Symptoms may include fluid and electrolyte imbalance, renal failure, cardiovascular and pulmonary complications.

Monitor fluids, electrolytes and renal function. Treatment of overdose should be directed towards the support of vital functions.

Ultravist is dialysable.

5. Pharmacological Properties 5.1 Pharmacodynamic Properties

Ultravist (iopromide) is a non-ionic contrast medium for intravascular radiological examinations and has only minimal pharmacological activity within the body.

The rate of protein binding is low and iopromide is a weak liberator of histamine. Cardiovascular and renal tolerance are good.

Ultravist has low osmolality.

The physico-chemical characteristics of the Ultravist range are listed below:

Iodine concentration (mg/ml)

150

240

300

370

Osmolality (osm/kg H2 O)

at 37 °C

 

0.33

 

0.48

 

0.59

 

0.77

Viscosity (mPa·s)

at 20 °C

at 37 °C

 

2.3

1.5

 

4.9

2.8

 

8.9

4.7

 

22.0

10.0

Density (g/ml)

at 20 °C

at 37 °C

 

1.164

1.158

 

1.263

1.255

 

1.328

1.322

 

1.409

1.399

5.2 Pharmacokinetic Properties

Following intravascular administration, iopromide is very rapidly distributed in the extracellular space. Plasma protein binding with a concentration of 1.2mg I/ml plasma is 0.9±0.2%. 5 minutes after intravenous bolus injection (within 1-5 min) of Ultravist 300, 28±6% of the dose was found in the total plasma volume, irrespective of the size of the dose. The contrast medium is first of all rapidly distributed, the half-life being 3 minutes, while the elimination half-life in patients with normal kidney function is approximately 2 hours, irrespective of the size of the dose. Under the doses recommended for diagnostic purposes, filtration of iopromide is exclusively glomerular. Renal excretion is approximately 18% of the dose within 30 minutes, approximately 60% within 3 hours and 92% within 24 hours. No metabolites were demonstrable in man following administration of the clinically relevant doses of iopromide.

5.3 Preclinical Safety Data

There are no pre-clinical safety data which could be of relevance to the prescriber and which are not already included in other relevant sections of the SPC.

6. Pharmaceutical Particulars 6.1 List Of Excipients

Sodium calcium edetate, trometamol, hydrochloric acid (diluted 10%), water for injection.

6.2 Incompatibilities

Some radiologists give an antihistamine or a corticosteroid prophylactically to patients with a history of allergy.

Because of possible precipitation, X-ray contrast media and prophylactic agents must not be injected as mixed solutions.

6.3 Shelf Life

3 years.

6.4 Special Precautions For Storage

Store below 30?C. Protect from light and X-rays.

6.5 Nature And Contents Of Container

Colourless glass infusion bottles of 50, 75, 100 and 200ml. Colourless glass ampoules and vials of 20ml. Packs of 10 x 20ml vials, 10 x 50, or 75ml bottles and 1 x 100 or 200ml bottles.

6.6 Special Precautions For Disposal And Other Handling

Contrast media should be visually inspected prior to use and must not be used, if discoloured, nor in the presence of particulate matter (including crystals) or defective containers. As Ultravist is a highly concentrated solution, crystallization (milky-cloudy appearance and/or sediment at the bottom, or floating crystals) may occur very rarely.

The contrast medium solution should not be drawn up into the syringe of the infusion bottle attached to the infusion set until immediately before the examination.

Vials containing contrast medium are not intended for the withdrawal of multiple doses. The rubber stopper should never be pierced more than once.

Contrast medium solution not used in one examination session must be discarded.

7. Marketing Authorisation Holder

Bayer plc

Bayer House

Strawberry Hill

Newbury

Berkshire RG14 1JA

United Kingdom

Trading as Bayer plc, Bayer Schering Pharma

8. Marketing Authorisation Number(S)

PL 00010/0566

9. Date Of First Authorisation/Renewal Of The Authorisation

01 May 2008

10. Date Of Revision Of The Text

22 January 2009



urea



ure-oh-FOL-li-troe-pin

Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

Bravelle Fertinex

In Canada

Fertinorm Hp Metrodin

Available Dosage Forms:

Powder for Solution

Therapeutic Class: Female Reproductive Agent

Pharmacologic Class: Human Follicle Stimulating Hormone

Uses For urofollitropin

Urofollitropin is a fertility drug that is identical to the hormone called follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) that is produced naturally by the pituitary gland.

FSH is primarily responsible for stimulating growth of the ovarian follicle, which includes the developing egg, the cells surrounding the egg that produce the hormones needed to support a pregnancy, and the fluid around the egg. As the ovarian follicle grows, an increasing amount of the hormone estrogen is produced by the cells in the follicle and released into the bloodstream. Estrogen causes the endometrium (lining of the uterus) to thicken before ovulation occurs. The higher blood levels of estrogen will also provide a cue to the hypothalamus and pituitary gland to slow the production and release of FSH.

Another pituitary hormone, luteinizing hormone (LH), also helps to increase the amount of estrogen produced by the follicle cells. However, the main function of LH is to cause ovulation. The sharp rise in the blood level of LH that triggers ovulation is sometimes called the LH surge. After ovulation, the group of hormone-producing follicle cells become what is called the corpus luteum and will produce estrogen and large amounts of another hormone, progesterone. Progesterone causes the endometrium to mature so that it can support the egg after it is fertilized. If implantation of a fertilized egg does not occur, the levels of estrogen and progesterone decrease, the endometrium sloughs off, and menstruation occurs.

Urofollitropin is usually given in combination with human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). The actions of hCG are almost identical to those of LH. It is given to simulate the natural LH surge. This results in predictable ovulation.

Urofollitropin is often used in women who have low levels of FSH and too-high levels of LH. Women with polycystic ovary syndrome usually have hormone levels such as this and are treated with urofollitropin to make up for the low amounts of FSH. Many women being treated with urofollitropin have already tried clomiphene (e.g., Serophene) and have not been able to conceive yet. Urofollitropin may also be used to cause the ovary to produce several follicles, which can then be harvested for use in gamete intrafallopian transfer (GIFT) or in vitro fertilization (IVF).

Urofollitropin is to be given only by or under the supervision of your doctor.

Before Using urofollitropin

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For urofollitropin, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to urofollitropin or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pregnancy Pregnancy Category Explanation All Trimesters X Studies in animals or pregnant women have demonstrated positive evidence of fetal abnormalities. This drug should not be used in women who are or may become pregnant because the risk clearly outweighs any possible benefit. Breast Feeding

There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. Tell your healthcare professional if you are taking any other prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medicine.

Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of urofollitropin. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

Cyst on ovary—Urofollitropin can cause further growth of cysts on the ovary Unusual vaginal bleeding—Some irregular vaginal bleeding is a sign that the endometrium is growing too rapidly, possibly of endometrial cancer, or some hormone imbalances; the increases in estrogen production caused by urofollitropin can make these problems worse. If a hormonal imbalance is present, it should be treated before beginning menotropins therapy Proper Use of urofollitropin Dosing

The dose of urofollitropin will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of urofollitropin. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

For injection dosage form: For becoming pregnant while having a condition called polycystic ovary syndrome: Adults—75 Units injected under the skin or into a muscle once a day for seven or more days. Usually, another medicine called chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) will be given the day after the last dose. If needed, your doctor may then increase your dose of urofollitropin to 150 Units a day for another seven or more days. Higher doses may be prescribed by your doctor. For becoming pregnant while using other pregnancy-promoting methods (assisted reproductive technology [ART]): Adults—150 Units injected under the skin or into a muscle once a day. Your treatment will probably begin on Day 2 or Day 3 after your menstrual period begins. Usually, another medicine called chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) will be given the day after the last dose. Precautions While Using urofollitropin

It is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits to make sure that the medicine is working properly and to check for unwanted effects. Your doctor will likely want to monitor the development of the ovarian follicle(s) by measuring the amount of estrogen in your bloodstream and by checking the size of the follicle(s) with ultrasound examinations.

If your doctor has asked you to record your basal body temperature (BBT) daily, make sure that you do this every day. It is important that intercourse take place around the time of ovulation to give you the best chance of becoming pregnant.

urofollitropin Side Effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor as soon as possible if any of the following side effects occur:

More common Abdominal or pelvic pain bloating (mild) redness, pain, or swelling at the injection site Less common or rare Abdominal or stomach pain (severe) bloating (moderate to severe) decreased amount of urine feeling of indigestion fever and chills nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea (continuing or severe) pelvic pain (severe) shortness of breath skin rash or hives swelling of lower legs weight gain (rapid)

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

Less common or rare Breast tenderness diarrhea (mild) nausea vomiting

After you stop using urofollitropin, it may still produce some side effects that need attention. During this period of time, check with your doctor immediately if you notice the following side effects:

Abdominal or stomach pain (severe) bloating (moderate to severe) decreased amount of urine feeling of indigestion nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea (continuing or severe) pelvic pain (severe) shortness of breath swelling of lower legs weight gain (rapid)

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: urofollitropin Intramuscular, Subcutaneous, Injection side effects (in more detail)

The information contained in the Thomson Reuters Micromedex products as delivered by Drugs.com is intended as an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment. It is not a substitute for a medical exam, nor does it replace the need for services provided by medical professionals. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before taking any prescription or over the counter drugs (including any herbal medicines or supplements) or following any treatment or regimen. Only your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist can provide you with advice on what is safe and effective for you.

The use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products is at your sole risk. These products are provided "AS IS" and "as available" for use, without warranties of any kind, either express or implied. Thomson Reuters Healthcare and Drugs.com make no representation or warranty as to the accuracy, reliability, timeliness, usefulness or completeness of any of the information contained in the products. Additionally, THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE MAKES NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTIES AS TO THE OPINIONS OR OTHER SERVICE OR DATA YOU MAY ACCESS, DOWNLOAD OR USE AS A RESULT OF USE OF THE THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS. ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR USE ARE HEREBY EXCLUDED. Thomson Reuters Healthcare does not assume any responsibility or risk for your use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products.

More urofollitropin Intramuscular, Subcutaneous, Injection resources Urofollitropin Intramuscular, Subcutaneous, Injection Side Effects (in more detail) Urofollitropin Intramuscular, Subcutaneous, Injection Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Urofollitropin Intramuscular, Subcutaneous, Injection Drug Interactions Urofollitropin Intramuscular, Subcutaneous, Injection Support Group 0 Reviews for Urofollitropin Intramuscular, Subcutaneous, Injection - Add your own review/rating Compare urofollitropin Intramuscular, Subcutaneous, Injection with other medications Female Infertility Follicle Stimulation



Generic Name: ranitidine



Generic Name: pancrelipase (oral) (pan kre LYE pace)



Generic Name: remifentanil (Intravenous route)

rem-i-FEN-ta-nil

Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

Ultiva

Available Dosage Forms:

Powder for Solution

Therapeutic Class: Analgesic

Chemical Class: Opioid

Uses For Ultiva

Remifentanil is used to relieve pain during and after surgery or other medical procedures. It is also used with other medicines (e.g., isoflurane, propofol, midazolam, thiopental, Diprivan®) just before or during an operation to help the anesthetic work better.

Remifentanil belongs to the group of medicines known as narcotic analgesics (pain medicines). It works by acting on the central nervous system (CNS) or brain to relieve pain.

Remifentanil is to be administered only by or under the immediate supervision of your doctor.

This medicine is available only with your doctor's prescription.

Before Using Ultiva

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this medicine, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated pediatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of remifentanil in children when given with an anesthetic before or during an operation. However, safety and efficacy have not been established in children for the relief of pain after surgery.

Geriatric

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated geriatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of remifentanil in the elderly. However, elderly patients are more sensitive to the effects of remifentanil, which may require an adjustment in the dose for patients receiving remifentanil.

Pregnancy Pregnancy Category Explanation All Trimesters C Animal studies have shown an adverse effect and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR no animal studies have been conducted and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women. Breast Feeding

There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are receiving this medicine, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

Adinazolam Alfentanil Alprazolam Amobarbital Anileridine Aprobarbital Bromazepam Brotizolam Butabarbital Butalbital Carisoprodol Chloral Hydrate Chlordiazepoxide Chlorzoxazone Clobazam Clonazepam Clorazepate Codeine Dantrolene Diazepam Estazolam Ethchlorvynol Fentanyl Flunitrazepam Flurazepam Fospropofol Halazepam Hydrocodone Hydromorphone Ketazolam Levorphanol Lorazepam Lormetazepam Medazepam Meperidine Mephenesin Mephobarbital Meprobamate Metaxalone Methocarbamol Methohexital Midazolam Morphine Morphine Sulfate Liposome Nitrazepam Nordazepam Opium Oxazepam Oxycodone Oxymorphone Pentobarbital Phenobarbital Prazepam Propoxyphene Quazepam Remifentanil Secobarbital Sodium Oxybate Sufentanil Tapentadol Temazepam Thiopental Triazolam Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of this medicine. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

Bradycardia (slow heartbeat) or Breathing or lung problems (e.g., apnea, respiratory depression) or Heart rhythm problems or Hypotension (low blood pressure)—Use with caution. May make these conditions worse. Fentanyl allergy (e.g., Actiq®, Duragesic®, Sublimaze®), history of—Should not be used in patients with this condition. Proper Use of Ultiva

A nurse or other trained health professional will give you this medicine in a hospital. This medicine is given through a needle placed in one of your veins.

Precautions While Using Ultiva

It is very important that your doctor check your progress closely while you are receiving this medicine to see if it is working properly and to allow for a change in the dose.

This medicine will add to the effects of alcohol and other CNS depressants (medicines that make you drowsy or less alert). Some examples of CNS depressants are antihistamines or medicine for hay fever, other allergies, or colds; sedatives, tranquilizers, or sleeping medicine; prescription pain medicine or narcotics; barbiturates or medicine for seizures; muscle relaxants; or other anesthetics, including some dental anesthetics. Check with your medical doctor or dentist before taking any of the above while you are receiving this medicine.

Check with your doctor right away if you have bluish lips or skin; chest pain; difficulty with breathing; a fast, pounding, or irregular heartbeat or pulse; shortness of breath; or muscle stiffness after receiving this medicine.

Dizziness, lightheadedness, or fainting may occur with this medicine, especially when you get up from a lying or sitting position suddenly. Getting up slowly may help, but if the problem continues or gets worse, check with your doctor.

This medicine may cause constipation. This is more common if you use it for a long time. Ask your doctor if you should also use a laxative to prevent and treat constipation.

Ultiva Side Effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor or nurse immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

More common Blurred vision chest pain or discomfort confusion difficult or troubled breathing dizziness, faintness, or lightheadedness when getting up from a lying or sitting position suddenly irregular, fast or slow, or shallow breathing lightheadedness, dizziness, or fainting muscle stiffness or tightness pale or blue lips, fingernails, or skin shortness of breath slow or irregular heartbeat sweating unusual tiredness or weakness Less common Bluish lips or skin chills decrease in cardiac output fast, pounding, or irregular heartbeat or pulse feeling of warmth fever headache nausea or vomiting nervousness not breathing pain after surgery pain in the shoulders, arms, jaw, or neck pounding in the ears problems with bleeding or clotting redness of the face, neck, arms, and occasionally, upper chest shivering Rare Abdominal or stomach pain black, tarry stools bleeding gums blood in the urine or stools body aches or pain burning, crawling, itching, numbness, prickling, "pins and needles", or tingling feelings congestion cough or hoarseness cough producing mucus coughing that sometimes produces a pink frothy sputum coughing up blood decreased frequency or amount of urine difficult, fast, or noisy breathing, sometimes with wheezing difficulty with swallowing disorientation dry mouth dryness or soreness of the throat dysphoria eye pain flushed, dry skin fruit-like breath odor general feeling of illness hiccups hives increased blood pressure increased hunger increased menstrual flow or vaginal bleeding increased sweating increased thirst increased urination itching loss of appetite lower back or side pain muscle cramps or pain nervousness noisy breathing nosebleeds numbness or tingling in the hands, feet, or lips painful or difficult urination pale skin paralysis pinpoint red spots on the skin prolonged bleeding from cuts puffiness or swelling of the eyelids or around the eyes, face, lips, or tongue rapid heartbeat red or black, tarry stools red or dark brown urine runny nose seizures shakiness in the legs, arms, hands, or feet skin rash small clicking, bubbling, or rattling sounds in the lungs when listening with a stethoscope stuffy nose swelling in the legs and ankles swelling of the face, fingers, or lower legs tender, swollen glands in the neck tightness in the chest troubled breathing with exertion unexplained weight loss unusual bleeding or bruising voice changes vomiting weakness and heaviness of the legs weight gain

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

Less common Anxiety blurred or loss of vision difficulty having a bowel movement (stool) disturbed color perception double vision halos around lights hyperventilation night blindness overbright appearance of lights pain at the injection site restlessness trouble with sleeping tunnel vision Rare Burning while urinating heartburn hives or welts loss of bladder control loss of memory nightmares problems with memory seeing, hearing, or feeling things that are not there severe constipation severe vomiting trouble with urinating uncontrolled eye movements

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Ultiva side effects (in more detail)

The information contained in the Thomson Reuters Micromedex products as delivered by Drugs.com is intended as an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment. It is not a substitute for a medical exam, nor does it replace the need for services provided by medical professionals. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before taking any prescription or over the counter drugs (including any herbal medicines or supplements) or following any treatment or regimen. Only your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist can provide you with advice on what is safe and effective for you.

The use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products is at your sole risk. These products are provided "AS IS" and "as available" for use, without warranties of any kind, either express or implied. Thomson Reuters Healthcare and Drugs.com make no representation or warranty as to the accuracy, reliability, timeliness, usefulness or completeness of any of the information contained in the products. Additionally, THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE MAKES NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTIES AS TO THE OPINIONS OR OTHER SERVICE OR DATA YOU MAY ACCESS, DOWNLOAD OR USE AS A RESULT OF USE OF THE THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS. ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR USE ARE HEREBY EXCLUDED. Thomson Reuters Healthcare does not assume any responsibility or risk for your use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products.

More Ultiva resources Ultiva Side Effects (in more detail) Ultiva Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Ultiva Drug Interactions Ultiva Support Group 0 Reviews for Ultiva - Add your own review/rating Ultiva Prescribing Information (FDA) Ultiva Concise Consumer Information (Cerner Multum) Ultiva Monograph (AHFS DI) Ultiva MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Compare Ultiva with other medications Anesthesia





Definition of Urinary Incontinence:

Incontinence is the inability to control the passage of urine. This can range from an occasional leakage of urine, to a complete inability to hold any urine.

The three main types of urinary incontinence are:

Stress incontinence -- occurs during certain activities like coughing, sneezing, laughing, or exercise.

Stress incontinence is a bladder storage problem in which the strength of the muscles (urethral sphincter) that help control urination is reduced. The sphincter is not able to prevent urine flow when there is increased pressure from the abdomen.

Stress incontinence may occur as a result of weakened pelvic muscles that support the bladder and urethra or because of a malfunction of the urethral sphincter.

Treatment for stress incontinence may include behavioral changes, medication, pelvic floor muscle training or surgery.

Urge incontinence -- involves a strong, sudden need to urinate followed by instant bladder contraction and involuntary loss of urine. You don't have enough time between when you recognize the need to urinate and when you actually do urinate.

In most cases of urge incontinence, no specific cause can be identified.Although urge incontinence may occur in anyone at any age, it is more common in women and the elderly.

Treatment for urge incontinence may include medication, retraining, and surgery.

Mixed incontinence -- contains components of both stress and urge incontinence.

Drugs associated with Urinary Incontinence

The following drugs and medications are in some way related to, or used in the treatment of Urinary Incontinence. This service should be used as a supplement to, and NOT a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners.

See sub-topics

Topics under Urinary Incontinence Overactive Bladder (18 drugs) Learn more about Urinary Incontinence

Medical Encyclopedia:

Urinary incontinence

Harvard Health Guide:

Symptoms and treatment for Urinary Incontinence



Generic Name: nafcillin (injection) (naf SIL in)



Generic Name: alfuzosin (Oral route)

al-FUE-zoe-sin

Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

Uroxatral

Available Dosage Forms:

Tablet, Extended Release

Therapeutic Class: Benign Prostatic Hypertrophy Agent

Pharmacologic Class: Alpha-1 Adrenergic Blocker

Uses For Uroxatral

Alfuzosin is used to treat the signs and symptoms of benign enlargement of the prostate (benign prostatic hyperplasia or BPH). Benign enlargement of the prostate is a problem that can occur in men as they get older. The prostate gland is located below the bladder. As the prostate gland enlarges, certain muscles in the gland may become tight and get in the way of the tube that drains urine from the bladder. This can cause problems with urinating, such as a need to urinate often, a weak stream when urinating, or a feeling of not being able to empty the bladder completely.

Alfuzosin helps relax the muscles in the prostate and the opening of the bladder. This may help increase the flow of urine or decrease the symptoms. However, alfuzosin will not shrink the prostate. The prostate may continue to get larger. This may cause the symptoms to become worse over time. Therefore, even though alfuzosin may lessen the problems caused by enlarged prostate now, surgery still may be needed in the future.

This medicine is usually given only to men. It is not normally given to women or children.

This medicine is available only with your doctor's prescription.

Before Using Uroxatral

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this medicine, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Alfuzosin is not indicated for use in the pediatric population. Safety and efficacy have not been established.

Geriatric

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated geriatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of alfuzosin in the elderly. However, elderly patients are more like to have age-related kidney or liver problems, which may require caution in patients receiving alfuzosin.

Pregnancy Pregnancy Category Explanation All Trimesters B Animal studies have revealed no evidence of harm to the fetus, however, there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR animal studies have shown an adverse effect, but adequate studies in pregnant women have failed to demonstrate a risk to the fetus. Breast Feeding

There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking this medicine, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is not recommended. Your doctor may decide not to treat you with this medication or change some of the other medicines you take.

Atazanavir Boceprevir Cisapride Darunavir Dronedarone Fluconazole Fosamprenavir Indinavir Itraconazole Ketoconazole Lopinavir Nelfinavir Pimozide Posaconazole Ritonavir Saquinavir Sparfloxacin Telaprevir Telithromycin Thioridazine Tipranavir

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

Amitriptyline Amoxapine Apomorphine Arsenic Trioxide Asenapine Astemizole Azithromycin Chloroquine Chlorpromazine Ciprofloxacin Citalopram Clomipramine Clozapine Crizotinib Dasatinib Desipramine Disopyramide Dofetilide Dolasetron Droperidol Flecainide Gatifloxacin Gemifloxacin Granisetron Halofantrine Haloperidol Ibutilide Iloperidone Imipramine Lapatinib Levofloxacin Lumefantrine Mefloquine Moxifloxacin Nilotinib Norfloxacin Nortriptyline Ofloxacin Ondansetron Paliperidone Pazopanib Perflutren Lipid Microsphere Procainamide Prochlorperazine Promethazine Propafenone Protriptyline Quetiapine Quinidine Quinine Ranolazine Salmeterol Sodium Phosphate Sodium Phosphate, Dibasic Sodium Phosphate, Monobasic Solifenacin Sorafenib Sunitinib Tadalafil Telavancin Terfenadine Tetrabenazine Toremifene Trazodone Trifluoperazine Trimipramine Vandetanib Vemurafenib Ziprasidone

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines may cause an increased risk of certain side effects, but using both drugs may be the best treatment for you. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

Acebutolol Alprenolol Atenolol Betaxolol Bevantolol Bisoprolol Bucindolol Carteolol Carvedilol Celiprolol Dilevalol Diltiazem Esmolol Labetalol Levobunolol Mepindolol Metipranolol Metoprolol Nadolol Nebivolol Oxprenolol Penbutolol Pindolol Propranolol Sildenafil Sotalol Talinolol Tertatolol Timolol Vardenafil Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of this medicine. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

Angina (severe chest pain) or Heart rhythm problems (e.g., congenital or acquired QT prolongation), or history of or Postural hypotension (low blood pressure)—Use with caution. May make these conditions worse. Cataract surgery—An eye problem called Intraoperative Floppy Iris Syndrome (IFIS) has occurred in patients who are taking or who have recently taken this medicine when they are having cataract surgery. You should tell your ophthalmologist (eye doctor) before your surgery if you are taking or have taken alfuzosin in the previous months. Kidney disease or Liver disease, mild—Use with caution. The effects may be increased because of slower removal of the medicine from the body. Liver disease, moderate or severe—Should not be used in patients with this condition. Proper Use of Uroxatral

Take this medicine exactly as directed by your doctor. Do not take more of it, do not take it more often, and do not take it for a longer time than your doctor ordered.

This medicine should be taken with food and with the same meal every day.

Swallow the extended-release tablet whole. Do not break, crush, or chew it.

This medicine comes with a patient information leaflet. Read and follow these instructions carefully. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions.

Dosing

The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

For oral dosage form (extended release tablets): For benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH): Adults—10 milligrams (mg) once a day. Children—Use is not recommended. Missed Dose

If you miss a dose of this medicine, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not double doses.

Storage

Store the medicine in a closed container at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and direct light. Keep from freezing.

Keep out of the reach of children.

Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed.

Ask your healthcare professional how you should dispose of any medicine you do not use.

Precautions While Using Uroxatral

It is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits to make sure that this medicine is working properly and for any problems that may be caused by this medicine.

Do not use this medicine if you are taking certain medicines such as ketoconazole (Nizoral®), itraconazole (Sporanox®), or ritonavir (Norvir®).

Dizziness, lightheadedness, or fainting may occur after you take this medicine, especially when you get up from a lying or sitting position. Getting up slowly may help lessen this problem. If you feel dizzy, lie down so you do not faint. Then sit for a few moments before standing to prevent the dizziness from returning.

This medicine may cause some people to become dizzy or less alert than they are normally. Make sure you know how you react to this medicine before you drive, use machines, or do anything else that could be dangerous if you are dizzy or are not alert.

You should seek medical attention right away if you experience a prolonged erection. This is an extremely rare side effect, but if it goes untreated, can result in permanent erectile dysfunction (impotence).

Stop using this medicine and check with your doctor right away if you have arm, back or jaw pain; chest pain or discomfort; chest tightness or heaviness; fast or irregular heartbeat; nausea; shortness of breath; or sweating.

This medicine may affect the results of the prostate specific antigen (PSA) test, which may be used to detect prostate cancer. Make sure you tell all of your doctors that you are using this medicine.

Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This includes prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medicines and herbal or vitamin supplements.

Uroxatral Side Effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

Rare Chest pain chills cold sweats confusion dizziness, faintness, or lightheadedness when getting up from a lying or sitting position fainting fast, pounding, or irregular heartbeat or pulse painful or prolonged erection of the penis Incidence not known Arm, back, or jaw pain chest discomfort chest tightness or heaviness large, hive-like swelling on the face, eyelids, lips, tongue, throat, hands, legs, feet, or sex organs nausea shortness of breath sweating swelling

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

More common Dizziness Less common Abdominal or stomach pain acid or sour stomach belching body aches or pain congestion cough cough producing mucus decreased interest in sexual intercourse difficulty breathing difficulty having a bowel movement (stool) dryness or soreness of the throat ear congestion fever headache heartburn hoarseness inability to have or keep an erection indigestion loss in sexual ability, desire, drive, or performance loss of voice nasal congestion pain pain or tenderness around the eyes and cheekbones sneezing sore throat stomach discomfort, upset, or pain stuffy or runny nose tender, swollen glands in the neck tightness in the chest trouble with swallowing unusual tiredness or weakness voice changes wheezing Rare Rash Incidence not known Diarrhea feeling of warmth hives or welts itching skin redness of the skin redness of the face, neck, arms, and occasionally, upper chest

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Uroxatral side effects (in more detail)

The information contained in the Thomson Reuters Micromedex products as delivered by Drugs.com is intended as an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment. It is not a substitute for a medical exam, nor does it replace the need for services provided by medical professionals. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before taking any prescription or over the counter drugs (including any herbal medicines or supplements) or following any treatment or regimen. Only your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist can provide you with advice on what is safe and effective for you.

The use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products is at your sole risk. These products are provided "AS IS" and "as available" for use, without warranties of any kind, either express or implied. Thomson Reuters Healthcare and Drugs.com make no representation or warranty as to the accuracy, reliability, timeliness, usefulness or completeness of any of the information contained in the products. Additionally, THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE MAKES NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTIES AS TO THE OPINIONS OR OTHER SERVICE OR DATA YOU MAY ACCESS, DOWNLOAD OR USE AS A RESULT OF USE OF THE THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS. ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR USE ARE HEREBY EXCLUDED. Thomson Reuters Healthcare does not assume any responsibility or risk for your use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products.

More Uroxatral resources Uroxatral Side Effects (in more detail) Uroxatral Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Drug Images Uroxatral Drug Interactions Uroxatral Support Group 11 Reviews for Uroxatral - Add your own review/rating Uroxatral Prescribing Information (FDA) Uroxatral Consumer Overview Uroxatral Monograph (AHFS DI) Uroxatral MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Alfuzosin Prescribing Information (FDA) Compare Uroxatral with other medications Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia



Pronunciation: thee-OF-i-lin



Pronunciation: feb-UX-oh-stat



Generic Name: phenazopyridine (Oral route)

fen-ay-zoe-PIR-i-deen

Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

Azo-Gesic Azo-Septic Azo-Standard Baridium Phenazo 95 Prodium Pyridiate Pyridium RE-Azo Urinary Pain Relief Uristat UTI Relief

Available Dosage Forms:

Tablet Kit

Therapeutic Class: Analgesic

Uses For Uristat

Phenazopyridine is used to relieve the pain, burning, and discomfort caused by infection or irritation of the urinary tract. It is not an antibiotic and will not cure the infection itself.

In the U.S., phenazopyridine is available only with your doctor's prescription.

Before Using Uristat

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this medicine, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Although there is no specific information comparing use of phenazopyridine in children with use in other age groups, it is not expected to cause different side effects or problems in children than it does in adults.

Geriatric

Many medicines have not been studied specifically in older people. Therefore, it may not be known whether they work exactly the same way they do in younger adults. Although there is no specific information comparing use of phenazopyridine in the elderly with use in other age groups, this medicine is not expected to cause different side effects or problems in older people than it does in younger adults.

Pregnancy Pregnancy Category Explanation All Trimesters B Animal studies have revealed no evidence of harm to the fetus, however, there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR animal studies have shown an adverse effect, but adequate studies in pregnant women have failed to demonstrate a risk to the fetus. Breast Feeding

There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. Tell your healthcare professional if you are taking any other prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medicine.

Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of this medicine. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency or Hepatitis or Kidney disease—The chance of side effects may be increased. Proper Use of phenazopyridine

This section provides information on the proper use of a number of products that contain phenazopyridine. It may not be specific to Uristat. Please read with care.

This medicine is best taken with food or after eating a meal or a snack to lessen stomach upset.

Do not use any leftover medicine for future urinary tract problems without first checking with your doctor. An infection may require additional medicine.

Dosing

The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

For oral dosage form (tablets): For relieving pain, burning, and discomfort in the urinary tract: Adults and teenagers—200 milligrams (mg) three times a day. Children—The dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 4 mg per kilogram (kg) (about 1.8 mg per pound) of body weight three times a day. Missed Dose

If you miss a dose of this medicine, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not double doses.

Storage

Store the medicine in a closed container at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and direct light. Keep from freezing.

Keep out of the reach of children.

Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed.

Precautions While Using Uristat

Check with your doctor if symptoms such as bloody urine, difficult or painful urination, frequent urge to urinate, or sudden decrease in the amount of urine appear or become worse while you are taking this medicine .

Phenazopyridine causes the urine to turn reddish orange . This is to be expected while you are using it. This effect is harmless and will go away after you stop taking the medicine. Also, the medicine may stain clothing.

For patients who wear soft contact lenses:

It is best not to wear soft contact lenses while being treated with this medicine. Phenazopyridine may cause discoloration or staining of contact lenses. It may not be possible to remove the stain.

For diabetic patients:

This medicine may cause false test results with urine sugar tests and urine ketone tests. If you have any questions about this, check with your health care professional, especially if your diabetes is not well controlled.

Before you have any medical tests, tell the person in charge that you are taking this medicine. The results of some tests may be affected by this medicine.

Uristat Side Effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor as soon as possible if any of the following side effects occur:

Rare Blue or blue-purple color of skin fever and confusion shortness of breath, tightness in chest, wheezing, or troubled breathing skin rash sudden decrease in the amount of urine swelling of face, fingers, feet, and/or lower legs unusual tiredness or weakness weight gain yellow eyes or skin

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

Less common or rare Dizziness headache indigestion itching of the skin stomach cramps or pain

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Uristat side effects (in more detail)

The information contained in the Thomson Reuters Micromedex products as delivered by Drugs.com is intended as an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment. It is not a substitute for a medical exam, nor does it replace the need for services provided by medical professionals. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before taking any prescription or over the counter drugs (including any herbal medicines or supplements) or following any treatment or regimen. Only your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist can provide you with advice on what is safe and effective for you.

The use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products is at your sole risk. These products are provided "AS IS" and "as available" for use, without warranties of any kind, either express or implied. Thomson Reuters Healthcare and Drugs.com make no representation or warranty as to the accuracy, reliability, timeliness, usefulness or completeness of any of the information contained in the products. Additionally, THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE MAKES NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTIES AS TO THE OPINIONS OR OTHER SERVICE OR DATA YOU MAY ACCESS, DOWNLOAD OR USE AS A RESULT OF USE OF THE THOMSON REUTERS HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS. ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR USE ARE HEREBY EXCLUDED. Thomson Reuters Healthcare does not assume any responsibility or risk for your use of the Thomson Reuters Healthcare products.

More Uristat resources Uristat Side Effects (in more detail) Uristat Use in Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Uristat Drug Interactions Uristat Support Group 3 Reviews for Uristat - Add your own review/rating Azo-Gesic MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer) Phenazopyridine Hydrochloride Monograph (AHFS DI) Pyridium Consumer Overview Compare Uristat with other medications Dysuria Interstitial Cystitis



Pronunciation: ue-REE-a/SOE-dee-um HYE-al-ure ON-ate



Generic Name: ustekinumab (YOO sti KIN ue mab)



Generic Name: acetaminophen



1. Name Of The Medicinal Product

UTROGESTAN 100MG CAPSULES

2. Qualitative And Quantitative Composition

Each capsule contains 100 mg micronised progesterone (INN). For excipients, see 6.1.

3. Pharmaceutical Form

Capsules, soft

White

4. Clinical Particulars 4.1 Therapeutic Indications

Adjunctive use with estrogen in post-menopausal women with an intact uterus. (HRT)

4.2 Posology And Method Of Administration

Posology

In women receiving estrogen replacement therapy there is an increased risk of endometrial cancer which can be countered by progesterone administration. The recommended dose is 200 mg daily at bedtime, for twelve days in the last half of each therapeutic cycle (beginning on day 15 of the cycle and ending on day 26). Withdrawal bleeding may occur in the following week. Alternatively 100 mg can be given at bedtime from day 1 to day 25 of each therapeutic cycle, withdrawal bleeding being less with this treatment schedule.

Children: Not applicable.

Elderly: As for adults

Method of Administration: Oral. Utrogestan 100mg Capsules should not be taken with food

4.3 Contraindications

Known allergy or hypersensitivity to progesterone or to any of the excipients. The capsules contain arachis oil (peanut oil) and should never be used by patients allergic to peanuts. Severe hepatic dysfunction. Undiagnosed vaginal bleeding. Mammary or genital tract carcinoma. Thrombophlebitis. Thromboembolic disorders. Cerebral haemorrhage. Porphyria.

4.4 Special Warnings And Precautions For Use

Warnings:

Utrogestan 100mg Capsules are not a treatment for premature labour.

Prescription of progesterone beyond the first trimester of pregnancy may reveal gravidic cholestasis.

Utrogestan 100mg Capsules are not suitable for use as a contraceptive.

If unexplained, sudden or gradual, partial or complete loss of vision, proptosis or diplopia, papilloedema, retinal vascular lesions or migraine occur during therapy, the drug should be discontinued and appropriate diagnostic and therapeutic measures instituted.

Utrogestan 100mg Capsules are intended to be co-prescribed with an estrogen product as HRT. Epidemiological evidence suggests that the use of HRT is associated with an increased risk of developing deep vein thrombosis (DVT) or pulmonary embolism. The prescribing information for the co-prescribed estrogen product should be referred to for information about the risks of venous thromboembolism.

There is suggestive evidence of a small increased risk of breast cancer with estrogen replacement therapy. It is not known whether concurrent progesterone influences the risk of cancer in post-menopausal women taking hormone replacement therapy. The prescribing information for the co-prescribed estrogen product should be referred to for information about the risks of breast cancer.

Precautions

Prior to taking hormone replacement therapy (and at regular intervals thereafter) each woman should be assessed. A personal and family medical history should be taken and physical examination should be guided by this and by the contraindications and warnings for this product.

Utrogestan 100mg Capsules should not be taken with food and should be taken at bedtime. Concomitant food ingestion increases the bioavailability of Utrogestan 100mg Capsules.

Utrogestan 100mg Capsules should be used cautiously in patients with conditions that might be aggravated by fluid retention (e.g. hypertension, cardiac disease, renal disease, epilepsy, migraine, asthma); in patients with a history of depression, diabetes, mild to moderate hepatic dysfunction, migraine or photosensitivity and in breast-feeding mothers.

Clinical examination of the breasts and pelvic examination should be performed where clinically indicated rather than as a routine procedure. Women should be encouraged to participate in the national breast cancer screening programme (mammography) and the national cervical cancer screening programme (cervical cytology) as appropriate for their age. Breast awareness should also be encouraged and women advised to report any changes in their breasts to their doctor or nurse.

4.5 Interaction With Other Medicinal Products And Other Forms Of Interaction

Utrogestan 100mg Capsules may interfere with the effects of bromocriptine and may raise the plasma concentration of ciclosporin. Utrogestan 100mg Capsules may affect the results of laboratory tests of hepatic and/or endocrine functions.

Metabolism of Utrogestan 100mg Capsules is accelerated by rifamycin an antibacterial agent.

The metabolism of progesterone by human liver microsomes was inhibited by ketoconazole (IC50 <0.1 ?M Ketoconazole is a known inhibitor of cytochrome P450 3A4. These data therefore suggest that ketoconazole may increase the bioavailability of progesterone. The clinical relevance of the in vitro findings is unknown.

4.6 Pregnancy And Lactation

Pregnancy

Utrogestan 100mg Capsules are not indicated during pregnancy. If pregnancy occurs during medication, Utrogestan 100mg Capsules should be withdrawn immediately.

Lactation

Detectable amounts of progesterone enter the breast milk. There is no indication for prescribing HRT during lactation.

4.7 Effects On Ability To Drive And Use Machines

Utrogestan 100mg Capsules may cause drowsiness and/or dizziness in a minority of patients; therefore caution is advised in drivers and users of machines. Taking the capsules at bedtime should reduce these effects during the day.

4.8 Undesirable Effects

Somnolence or transient dizziness may occur 1 to 3 hours after intake of the drug. Bedtime dosing and reduction of the dose may reduce these effects.

Shortening of the cycle or breakthrough bleeding may occur. If this occurs, the dose of Utrogestan 100mg Capsules can be reduced and taken at bedtime from day 1 to day 26 of each therapeutic cycle.

Acne, urticaria, rashes, fluid retention, weight changes, gastro-intestinal disturbances, changes in libido, breast discomfort, premenstrual symptoms, menstrual disturbances; also chloasma, depression, pyrexia, insomnia, alopecia, hirsutism; rarely jaundice.

Venous thromboembolism, i.e. deep leg or pelvic venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, is more frequent among hormone replacement therapy users than among non-users.

4.9 Overdose

Symptoms of overdosage may include somnolence, dizziness, euphoria or dysmenorrhoea. Treatment is observation and, if necessary, symptomatic and supportive measures should be provided.

5. Pharmacological Properties 5.1 Pharmacodynamic Properties

Pharmacotherapeutic group (ATC code: G03D)

Progesterone is a natural progestogen, the main hormone of the corpus luteum and the placenta. It acts on the endometrium by converting the proliferating phase to the secretory phase. Utrogestan 100mg Capsules have all the properties of endogenous progesterone with induction of a full secretory endometrium and in particular gestagenic, antiestrogenic, slightly anti-androgenic and antialdosterone effects.

5.2 Pharmacokinetic Properties

Absorption

Micronised progesterone is absorbed by the digestive tract. Pharmacokinetic studies conducted in healthy volunteers have shown that after oral administration of 2 capsules (200mg), plasma progesterone levels increased to reach the Cmax of 13.8ng/ml +/- 2.9ng/ml in 2.2 +/- 1.4 hours. The elimination half-life observed was 16.8+/- 2.3 hours.

Although there were inter-individual variations, the individual pharmacokinetic characteristics were maintained over several months, indicating predictable responses to the drug.

Distribution

Progesterone is approximately 96%-99% bound to serum proteins, primarily to serum albumin (50%-54%) and transcortin (43%-48%).

Elimination

Urinary elimination is observed for 95% in the form of glycuroconjugated metabolites, mainly 3 ?, 5 ?–pregnanediol (pregnandiol).

Metabolism

Progesterone is metabolised primarily by the liver. The main plasma metabolites are 20 ? hydroxy- ? 4 ?- prenolone and 5 ?-dihydroprogesterone. Some progesterone metabolites are excreted in the bile and these may be deconjugated and further metabolised in the gut via reduction, dehydroxylation and epimerisation. The main plasma and urinary metabolites are similar to those found during the physiological secretion of the corpus luteum.

5.3 Preclinical Safety Data

Preclinical data revealed no special hazard for humans based on conventional studies of safety pharmacology and toxicity.

6. Pharmaceutical Particulars 6.1 List Of Excipients

Arachis oil

Soya lecithin

Gelatin

Glycerol

Titanium dioxide

6.2 Incompatibilities

None.

6.3 Shelf Life

3 years.

6.4 Special Precautions For Storage

No special precautions for storage.

6.5 Nature And Contents Of Container

The product is supplied in PVC/Aluminium blisters contained in cartons.

Pack size: 30 capsules

6.6 Special Precautions For Disposal And Other Handling

Not applicable.

7. Marketing Authorisation Holder

Laboratoires BESINS INTERNATIONAL

3, rue du Bourg l'Abb?

75003

Paris

France

8. Marketing Authorisation Number(S)

PL 16468/0001

9. Date Of First Authorisation/Renewal Of The Authorisation

10 January 2003

10. Date Of Revision Of The Text

Feburary 2006



Pronunciation: HAL-oh-BAY-ta-sol/a-MOE-nee-um LAK-tate



Generic Name: prenatal multivitamins (PRE nay tal VYE ta mins)



1
2 3 Next →